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Boustedt, Jonas
Publikasjoner (10 av 31) Visa alla publikasjoner
McCartney, R., Boustedt, J., Eckerdal, A., Sanders, K. & Zander, C. (2017). Folk pedagogy and the geek gene: geekiness quotient. In: Proceedings of the 2017 ACM SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education: . Paper presented at 48th ACM SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, SIGCSE 2017; Seattle, United States; 8-11 March 2017 (pp. 405-410). NY, USA: ACM Digital Library
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Folk pedagogy and the geek gene: geekiness quotient
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2017 (engelsk)Inngår i: Proceedings of the 2017 ACM SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, NY, USA: ACM Digital Library, 2017, s. 405-410Konferansepaper, Publicerat paper (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

In a survey of the CS-education community, we find a range of beliefs about the "geek gene" theory. We suggest an alternative term, the "geekiness quotient (GQ)". The GQ, grounded in Gardner's work on multiple intelligences, is a hypothetical measure of the student's current CS ability. The GQ supports a moderate view of the geek gene: that students arrive in our classrooms with a range of CS abilities, whether acquired through background or innate talent, and can improve their abilities through effort.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
NY, USA: ACM Digital Library, 2017
Emneord
fixed or growth mindset, folk pedagogy, geek gene, innate ability
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23964 (URN)10.1145/3017680.3017746 (DOI)000468494200074 ()2-s2.0-85018307420 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-4698-6 (ISBN)
Konferanse
48th ACM SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, SIGCSE 2017; Seattle, United States; 8-11 March 2017
Tilgjengelig fra: 2017-05-02 Laget: 2017-05-02 Sist oppdatert: 2019-08-28bibliografisk kontrollert
Sanders, K., Boustedt, J., Eckerdal, A., McCartney, R. & Zander, C. (2017). Folk Pedagogy: Nobody Doesn't Like Active Learning. In: Josh Tenenberg and Lauri Malmi (Ed.), Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on International Computing Education Research (ICER 17): . Paper presented at ACM Conference on International Computing Education, August 18-20, 2017, Tacoma, WA, USA (pp. 145-154). Tacoma, Washington, USA: ACM Publications
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Folk Pedagogy: Nobody Doesn't Like Active Learning
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2017 (engelsk)Inngår i: Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on International Computing Education Research (ICER 17) / [ed] Josh Tenenberg and Lauri Malmi, Tacoma, Washington, USA: ACM Publications, 2017, s. 145-154Konferansepaper, Publicerat paper (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

In a survey of the computing education community, many respondents suggested "active learning" as a teaching approach that would increase the likelihood of student success. In light of these responses, we analyze the way in which active learning is described in the computing-education literature. We find a strong consensus that active learning is good, but a lack of precision in how the term is used, often without definition, to describe instructional techniques, rather than student learning. In addition, active learning techniques are often discussed as if they were all equally effective. We suggest that making clear distinctions, both between teaching techniques and active learning and among the teaching techniques, would be fruitful for both instructors and researchers. Finally, we propose some dimensions along which distinctions among techniques could usefully be made.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Tacoma, Washington, USA: ACM Publications, 2017
Emneord
active learning, activity, folk pedagogy, reflection, social interaction, techniques
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25168 (URN)10.1145/3105726.3106192 (DOI)000426498000018 ()2-s2.0-85030168149 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-4968-0 (ISBN)
Konferanse
ACM Conference on International Computing Education, August 18-20, 2017, Tacoma, WA, USA
Tilgjengelig fra: 2017-09-06 Laget: 2017-09-06 Sist oppdatert: 2018-05-31bibliografisk kontrollert
Thomas, L., Boustedt, J., Eckerdal, A., McCartney, R., Moström, J.-E., Sanders, K. & Zander, C. (2017). In the liminal space: software design as a threshold skill. Practice and Evidence of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 12(2), 333-351
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>In the liminal space: software design as a threshold skill
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2017 (engelsk)Inngår i: Practice and Evidence of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, ISSN 1750-8428, E-ISSN 1750-8428, Vol. 12, nr 2, s. 333-351Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

In previous work we proposed the idea of ‘threshold skills’ as a complement to threshold concepts. The definition of threshold concepts assumes that theoretical knowledge is paramount: gaining the understanding of particular concepts irreversibly transforms the learners. We noted, however, that mastering computing, like many disciplines, requires learning a combination of concepts and skills, and we suggested that this required further investigation. In this paper we examine the activity of designing software as a possible example of such a threshold skill. We looked at 35 software designs collected from students nearing graduation in computing courses, and see many of the characteristics of threshold skill and also of students being in liminal space. A close examination of the students’ designs leads to some useful implications for teaching this fundamental activity.

Emneord
Threshold concepts, Threshold skills, Professional education, Practice
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-20650 (URN)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2015-11-24 Laget: 2015-11-24 Sist oppdatert: 2018-03-13bibliografisk kontrollert
McCartney, R., Boustedt, J., Eckerdal, A., Sanders, K., Thomas, L. & Zander, C. (2016). Why computing students learn on their own: motivation for self-directed learning of computing. ACM Transactions on Computing Education, 16(1), 2:1-2:18, Article ID 2.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Why computing students learn on their own: motivation for self-directed learning of computing
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2016 (engelsk)Inngår i: ACM Transactions on Computing Education, ISSN 1946-6226, E-ISSN 1946-6226, Vol. 16, nr 1, s. 2:1-2:18, artikkel-id 2Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article, we address the question of why computing students choose to learn computing topics on their own. A better understanding of why some students choose to learn on their own may help us to motivate other students to develop this important skill. In addition, it may help in curriculum design; if we need to leave some topics out of our expanding curriculum, a good choice might be those topics that students readily learn on their own.

Based on a thematic analysis of 17 semistructured interviews, we found that computing students’ motivations for self-directed learning fall into four general themes: projects, social and peer interactions, joy of learning, and fear. Under these, we describe several more specific subthemes, illustrated in the words of the students.

The project-related and social motivations are quite prominent. Although these motivations appear in theliterature, they received greater emphasis from our interviewees. Perhaps most characteristic of computingis the motivation to learn to complete some project, both projects done for fun and projects required for schoolor work.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016
Emneord
Measurement, Experimentation, Motivation, informal learning, self-directed learning
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-20648 (URN)10.1145/2747008 (DOI)000373910200003 ()2-s2.0-84955469730 (Scopus ID)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2015-11-24 Laget: 2015-11-24 Sist oppdatert: 2018-03-13bibliografisk kontrollert
Thomas, L., Boustedt, J., Eckerdal, A., McCartney, R., Moström, J.-E., Sanders, K. & Zander, C. (2014). A broader threshold: Including skills as well as concepts in computing education. In: Catherine O´Mahony, Aril Buchanan,Mary O´Rourke, Bettie Higgs (Ed.), Threshold Concepts: From personal practice to communities of practice: Proceedings of the National Academy’s Sixth Annual Conference and the Fourth Biennial Threshold Concepts Conference. Paper presented at NAIRTL 2014, National Academy’s Sixth Annual Conference and the Fourth Biennial Threshold Concepts Conference, 27-29 June 2012, Dublin, Ireland (pp. 154-158). Cork, Ireland: NAIRTL
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>A broader threshold: Including skills as well as concepts in computing education
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2014 (engelsk)Inngår i: Threshold Concepts: From personal practice to communities of practice: Proceedings of the National Academy’s Sixth Annual Conference and the Fourth Biennial Threshold Concepts Conference / [ed] Catherine O´Mahony, Aril Buchanan,Mary O´Rourke, Bettie Higgs, Cork, Ireland: NAIRTL , 2014, s. 154-158Konferansepaper, Publicerat paper (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

We propose ‘threshold skills’ as a complement to threshold concepts. The definition of threshold concepts assumes that theoretical knowledge is paramount: gaining the understanding of particular concepts irreversibly transforms the learners.

Mastering computing, like many disciplines, however, requires learning a combination of concepts and skills. Mathematicians learn to do proofs, musicians learn to play their instruments, and martial artists learn to make moves by doing these activities, not just intellectually understanding them. We propose some characteristics for threshold skills and outline implications for teaching and for future work.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Cork, Ireland: NAIRTL, 2014
Emneord
Threshold concepts, threshold skills, professional education, practice
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-20652 (URN)978 - 1 - 906642 - 5 9 - 4 (ISBN)
Konferanse
NAIRTL 2014, National Academy’s Sixth Annual Conference and the Fourth Biennial Threshold Concepts Conference, 27-29 June 2012, Dublin, Ireland
Merknad

All these original works are made available under the Creative Commons Licence (http://creativecommons.org/) identified as Attribution-Non-Commercial-ShareAlike 3.0

Tilgjengelig fra: 2015-11-24 Laget: 2015-11-24 Sist oppdatert: 2018-03-13bibliografisk kontrollert
McCartney, R., Boustedt, J., Eckerdal, A., Sanders, K. & Zander, C. (2013). Can first–year students program yet?: a study revisited. In: Beth Simon, Alison Clear, Quintin Cutts (Ed.), ICER´13: Proceedings of the ninth International Conference on International Computing Education Research: . Paper presented at ICER '13 International Computing Education Research Conference, August 12 - 14, 2013, La Jolla, CA, USA (pp. 91-98). Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Can first–year students program yet?: a study revisited
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2013 (engelsk)Inngår i: ICER´13: Proceedings of the ninth International Conference on International Computing Education Research / [ed] Beth Simon, Alison Clear, Quintin Cutts, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013, s. 91-98Konferansepaper, Publicerat paper (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

Threshold concepts can be used to both organize disciplinaryknowledge and explain why students have diculties at cer-tain points in the curriculum. Threshold concepts transforma student's view of the discipline; before being learned, theycan block a student's progress.In this paper, we propose that in computing, skills, inaddition to concepts, can sometimes be thresholds. Somestudents report nding skills more dicult than concepts.We discuss some computing skills that may be thresholdsand compare threshold skills and threshold concepts.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013
Emneord
threshold concepts, threshold skills
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-20651 (URN)10.1145/2493394.2493412 (DOI)
Konferanse
ICER '13 International Computing Education Research Conference, August 12 - 14, 2013, La Jolla, CA, USA
Tilgjengelig fra: 2015-11-24 Laget: 2015-11-24 Sist oppdatert: 2018-03-13bibliografisk kontrollert
Zander, C., Boustedt, J., Eckerdal, A., Mccartney, R., Moström, J. E., Sanders, K. & Thomas, L. (2012). Self-directed learning: Stories from industry. In: Proceedings - 12th Koli Calling International Conference on Computing Education Research, Koli Calling 2012: . Paper presented at 12th Koli Calling International Conference on Computing Education Research, Koli Calling 2012, 15-18 November, Koli, Finland (pp. 111-117).
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Self-directed learning: Stories from industry
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2012 (engelsk)Inngår i: Proceedings - 12th Koli Calling International Conference on Computing Education Research, Koli Calling 2012, 2012, s. 111-117Konferansepaper, Publicerat paper (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

We report preliminary results from an ongoing investigation of how computing professionals perceive and value selfdirected learning, based on a qualitative analysis of interviews with ten computing professionals. The professionals expect that future colleagues will have a well-developed ability to learn on their own. They indicate that professionals use a range of resources, strategies, and collaborators to help them learn. They find their work-related self-directed learning enjoyable, expressing a sense of confidence and pride; yet they often also find it to be a stressful never-ending process.

Emneord
Industry perspective, Informal learning, Self-directed learning
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-15223 (URN)10.1145/2401796.2401810 (DOI)2-s2.0-84871586550 (Scopus ID)978-145031795-5 (ISBN)
Konferanse
12th Koli Calling International Conference on Computing Education Research, Koli Calling 2012, 15-18 November, Koli, Finland
Tilgjengelig fra: 2013-09-13 Laget: 2013-09-13 Sist oppdatert: 2018-03-13bibliografisk kontrollert
Boustedt, J. (2012). Students' different understandings of class diagrams. Computer Science Education, 22(1), 29-62
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Students' different understandings of class diagrams
2012 (engelsk)Inngår i: Computer Science Education, ISSN 0899-3408, E-ISSN 1744-5175, Vol. 22, nr 1, s. 29-62Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

The software industry needs well-trained software designers and one important aspect of software design is the ability to model softwaredesigns visually and understand what visual models represent. However, previous research indicates that software design is a difficulttask to many students. This article reports empirical findings from aphenomenographic investigation on how students understand classdiagrams, Unified Modeling Language (UML) symbols, and relationsto object-oriented (OO) concepts. The informants were 20 Computer Science students from four different universities in Sweden. The results show qualitatively different ways to understand and describe UML class diagrams and the ‘‘diamond symbols’’ representing aggregation and composition. The purpose of class diagrams was understood in a varied way, from describing it as a documentation to a more advanced view related to communication. The descriptions of class diagrams varied from seeing them as a specification of classes to a more advanced view, where they were described to show hierarchic structures of classes and relations. The diamond symbols were seen as ‘‘relations’’ and a more advanced way was seeing the white and theblack diamonds as different symbols for aggregation and composition. As a consequence of the results, it is recommended that UML should be adopted in courses. It is briefly indicated how the phenomenographic results in combination with variation theory can be used by teachers to enhance students’ possibilities to reach advanced understanding of phenomena related to UML classdiagrams. Moreover, it is recommended that teachers should put more effort in assessing skills in proper usage of the basic symbols and models and students should be provided with opportunities to practise collaborative design, e.g. using whiteboards.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
London, UK: Routledge, 2012
Emneord
class diagram, Java, phenomenography, programming, software engineering
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-11622 (URN)10.1080/08993408.2012.665210 (DOI)2-s2.0-84859322842 (Scopus ID)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2012-03-15 Laget: 2012-03-15 Sist oppdatert: 2018-03-13bibliografisk kontrollert
Sanders, K., Boustedt, J., Eckerdal, A., McCartney, R., Moström, J. E., Thomas, L. & Zander, C. (2012). Threshold concepts and threshold skills in computing. In: Proceedings of the ninth annual international conference on International computing education research. Paper presented at ICER'12 Auckland, September 10-12, 2012, Auckland, New Zealand. (pp. 23-30). New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Threshold concepts and threshold skills in computing
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2012 (engelsk)Inngår i: Proceedings of the ninth annual international conference on International computing education research, New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012, s. 23-30Konferansepaper, Publicerat paper (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

Threshold concepts can be used to both organize disciplinary knowledge and explain why students have difficulties at certain points in the curriculum. Threshold concepts transform a student's view of the discipline; before being learned, they can block a student's progress.

In this paper, we propose that in computing, skills, in addition to concepts, can sometimes be thresholds. Some students report finding skills more difficult than concepts. We discuss some computing skills that may be thresholds and compare threshold skills and threshold concepts.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012
Emneord
threshold concepts, threshold skills
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-13491 (URN)10.1145/2361276.2361283 (DOI)2-s2.0-84867349823 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-1604-0 (ISBN)
Konferanse
ICER'12 Auckland, September 10-12, 2012, Auckland, New Zealand.
Tilgjengelig fra: 2012-12-03 Laget: 2012-12-03 Sist oppdatert: 2018-03-13bibliografisk kontrollert
Boustedt, J., McCartney, R., Tenenberg, J., Cooper, S., Garcia, D. D., Friend Hutton, M., . . . Richards, B. (2011). It seemed like a good idea at the time. In: SIGCSE'11: Proceedings of the 42nd ACM technical symposium on Computer science education. Paper presented at SIGCSE 2011, March 9-12, 2011, Dallas, Texas, USA (pp. 163-164). New York, NY, USA: ACM
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>It seemed like a good idea at the time
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2011 (engelsk)Inngår i: SIGCSE'11: Proceedings of the 42nd ACM technical symposium on Computer science education, New York, NY, USA: ACM , 2011, s. 163-164Konferansepaper, Publicerat paper (Annet vitenskapelig)
Abstract [en]

We often learn of successful pedagogical experiments, but we seldom hear of the the ones that failed. For this special session we solicited submissions from the SIGCSE membership, selected the best from among these, and will have presentations at the session by the selected authors. Our contributions describe pedagogical approaches that seemed to be good ideas but turned out as failures. Contributors will describe their pedagogical experiment, the rationale for the experiment, evidence of failure, and lessons learned.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
New York, NY, USA: ACM, 2011
Emneord
breakdown, disaster, doom, failure, fiasco, gloom, humiliation, termination
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-10530 (URN)10.1145/1953163.1953215 (DOI)000289490900034 ()2-s2.0-79954443877 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-0500-6 (ISBN)
Konferanse
SIGCSE 2011, March 9-12, 2011, Dallas, Texas, USA
Tilgjengelig fra: 2011-09-28 Laget: 2011-09-28 Sist oppdatert: 2018-03-13bibliografisk kontrollert
Organisasjoner