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Publications (10 of 31) Show all publications
Philipson, S. (2017). Value of Listed Companies; Abnormal Earnings and Innovativeness. In: Vrontis, D., Weber, Y. & Tsoukatos, E. (Ed.), Global and national business theories and practice: bridging the past with the future: . Paper presented at 10th Annual Conference of the EuroMed Academy of Business, 13-15 September 2017, Rome, Italy (pp. 1342-1348). EuroMed Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Value of Listed Companies; Abnormal Earnings and Innovativeness
2017 (English)In: Global and national business theories and practice: bridging the past with the future / [ed] Vrontis, D., Weber, Y. & Tsoukatos, E., EuroMed Press , 2017, p. 1342-1348Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This a conceptual paper concerning the relation between innovativeness and monopoly rent/abnormal earnings. It discusses how these concepts can be measured and proposes that abnormal earnings are the result differentiation, by innovativeness (monopoly rent) or branding, by under- or overvalued assets, or by imperfect market information (value irrelevance). Specifically, innovativeness as a driver of monopoly rent/abnormal earnings is discussed. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
EuroMed Press, 2017
Keywords
Innovativeness; monopoly rent, abnormal earnings.
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25892 (URN)978-9963-711-56-7 (ISBN)
Conference
10th Annual Conference of the EuroMed Academy of Business, 13-15 September 2017, Rome, Italy
Available from: 2017-12-21 Created: 2017-12-21 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Philipson, S. & Philipson, J. (2016). From Budapest to Berlin – The role of reputation in the market economy. International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, 28(2-3), 310-322
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Budapest to Berlin – The role of reputation in the market economy
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 28, no 2-3, p. 310-322Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During a trip from Budapest to Berlin in 1990, Joakim Philipson made observations about a grey market trade between Rumanian Roma and Vietnamese guest students in Berlin. It was seemingly inexplicable how the two groups could enter into business relationships without a common language.

This paper uses the narrative as a basis for a discussion and interpretation of conditional trust and validates classical economic value theory.

As “...research on trust... is relatively diverse and multidisciplinary (Dirks & Ferrin, 2001; Lewicki et al., 1998, both after Gordon, 2007), we are drawing on research in as diverse fields as sociology, game theory, anthropology, and classical economics to question the paradigm that is the basis of both transaction cost economics and relationship management. As such the paper is a narrative case used for conceptual discourse.

Keywords
conditional trust, reputation, market, market economy, informal economy, society, the human race as a social animal
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-20129 (URN)v (DOI)2-s2.0-84971594748 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-08-20 Created: 2015-08-20 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Philipson, S. & Philipson, J. (2016). From Budapest to Berlin – the role of reputation in the market economy. Paper presented at 20th Annual International Conference on Advances in Management, and 6th Annual International Conference on Social Intelligence, 17–19 July 2013, London, UK. International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, 28(2/3), 310-322
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Budapest to Berlin – the role of reputation in the market economy
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 28, no 2/3, p. 310-322Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During a trip from Budapest to Berlin in 1990, Joakim Philipson made observations about a grey market trade between Rumanian Roma and Vietnamese guest students in Berlin. It was seemingly inexplicable how the two groups could enter into business relationships without a common language. This paper uses the narrative as a basis for a discussion and interpretation of conditional trust and validates classical economic value theory. As “...research on trust... is relatively diverse and multidisciplinary” (Dirks and Ferrin, 2001; Lewicki et al., 1998; both after Gordon, 2007), we are drawing on research in as diverse fields as sociology, game theory, anthropology, and classical economics to question the paradigm that is the basis of both transaction cost economics and relationship management. As such the paper is a narrative case used for conceptual discourse.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
InderScience Publishers, 2016
Keywords
conditional trust; reputation; market; market economy; informal economy; society; the human race as a social animal; Hungary; Germany.
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25891 (URN)10.1504/IJESB.2016.076647 (DOI)
Conference
20th Annual International Conference on Advances in Management, and 6th Annual International Conference on Social Intelligence, 17–19 July 2013, London, UK
Available from: 2017-12-21 Created: 2017-12-21 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Philipson, S., Johansson, J. & Schley, D. G. (2016). Global Corporate Governance: The Maelstrom of Increased Complexity: Is It Possible to Learn to Ride the Dragon?. Journal of Business and Economics, 7(3), 425-437
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global Corporate Governance: The Maelstrom of Increased Complexity: Is It Possible to Learn to Ride the Dragon?
2016 (English)In: Journal of Business and Economics, ISSN 2155-7950, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 425-437Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the light of recent corporate scandals company failure is usually explained based on agency theory, leading to the conclusion that corporate boards and regulators must use agency theory to control management better.

The authors use institutional theory to problematize this advice. We identify the role of accounting as to give predictability, hence preventing company failure. But this predictability can be questioned; it implies stability. Albeit partly with circumstantial evidence, we question this stability with factors making the conditions for management decision-making volatile, as explained by antecedents, and leading to unmanageable entities. The implications of this volatility have consequences for corporate governance, and question the going-concern assumption, the basis of accounting.

Hence, from the dominant explanations that corrupt management, or management with different interests than the principal, leads to company failure, we evolve another chain of cause and effect: volatility, with company failure as a result. It is argued that traditional accounting rituals are unsuitable for many companies. The paper indicates a need for de-institutionalization and reconsidering of accounting practices, and particularly the fundamental assumption of going concern.

Keywords
accounting; complexity; corporate governance; going-concern; management control; information use; innovation; volatility; uncertainty
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Economy, Business administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23071 (URN)10.15341/jbe(2155-7950)/03.07.2016/007 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-03-04 Created: 2016-12-15 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Philipson, S. (2016). Radical innovation of a business model: Is business modelling a key to understand the essence of doing business?. Competitiveness Review: an international business journal, 26(2), 132-146
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Radical innovation of a business model: Is business modelling a key to understand the essence of doing business?
2016 (English)In: Competitiveness Review: an international business journal, ISSN 1059-5422, E-ISSN 2051-3143, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 132-146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

“Business model” emerged fairly recently as an academic concept; competing with “sustainable strategic competitiveness”, “strategic fit” (Porter, 1996), and “dominant logic” (Prahalad & Bettis, 1986) to give key explanatory understanding of firm performance.

This paper investigates key antecedents to the use of radical innovation of the business model of a service firm to achieve competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

The article is based on action research, in which the re-engineering of a service business turned into radical innovation of the business model.

Findings

Radical innovation (conceived of as a new dominant logic) of the business model of a service firm is shown to give sustainable competitive advantage.

It shows how fundamental the concept of business model is to understanding the nature of the business, and links it to fundamental academic discussion of recent decades around concepts such as “sustainable competitive advantage”, “structural capital” and “tacit knowledge”.

Research limitations/implications

This is based on a case and more research is needed to generalize the findings.

Practical implications

In contrast to the knowledge management and structural capital evangelization, much tacit knowledge cannot be converted to structural capital.

Originality/value

Business model is a central concept to understand business performance, but must not be conceived as all-encompassing. We give a model for what the concept should cover and contrast it to other important models.

We show the role of tacit knowledge in a business model.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016
Keywords
Business model, Competitive advantage, Fit, Tacit knowledge, Structural capital
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-20026 (URN)10.1108/CR-06-2015-0061 (DOI)000392738000003 ()2-s2.0-84961620798 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-07-15 Created: 2015-07-15 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Philipson, S. (2016). When ASEA become ABB - the deconstruction of the myth of the "supremacy of the plants". In: Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Digital Ecosystems: . Paper presented at 9th Annual Conference of the EuroMed Academy of Business, 14-16 September, 2016, Warsaw, Poland (pp. 1474-1487).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>When ASEA become ABB - the deconstruction of the myth of the "supremacy of the plants"
2016 (English)In: Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Digital Ecosystems, 2016, p. 1474-1487Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Purpose - This paper aims to investigate how the dominating myths of of a company changes.

Design/methodology/approach - The article is based on action research, and an analysis based on Marx and Gramsci.

Findings - In contrast to institutional theory and the individualistic so called top-echelon theories it is shown that top management is not necessarily in control of a company's direction and that it is necessary also for top-management to liberate themselves from hegemonic minds that threaten company survival.

Research limitations/implications - This is based on a case, and more research is needed to generalize the findings.

Practical implications - Elements of how to play the political games of subcultural conflicts It is shown.

Originality/value - The article shows that top management is neither necessarily in control of the company and neither have a clear understanding how to gain control, but that such control can be achieved as a truce between subcultures of acceptable intentionality.

Keywords
Subculture, Hegemony, Political process
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23642 (URN)000390841500113 ()978-9963-711-43-7 (ISBN)
Conference
9th Annual Conference of the EuroMed Academy of Business, 14-16 September, 2016, Warsaw, Poland
Available from: 2017-02-16 Created: 2017-02-16 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Philipson, S. (2015). Entrepreneurial learning in higher education. In: : . Paper presented at Lärarlärdom 2015, 19 August 2015, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Entrepreneurial learning in higher education
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This article proposes to build a entrepreneurial learning environment for future business professionals, based on a better knowledge about requirements, a pedagogic ethos, and the economic necessity to build structural capital in higher education.

Professional academic education has to comply with many demands; a professional community that requires productive workers, a faculty that requires the students to get a certain level of understanding of one or several social science subjects, and social science methodology. This paper proposes to build such educations based on community based concept maps and a Vygotskian pedagogics.

The costs of running higher education typically has a cost structure with 60-65% salaries, 20-25% fixed costs, mainly buildings, and some 10% expenses. The high share of salaries and almost non-existing productivity increases the relative cost of higher education as the productivity in producing other product and services increases. Together with the increasing share of the population that need higher education the cost for society has radically increased. In an effort to economise with limited resources most western countries have radically differentiated the financing between technical and medical education on the one hand and social science on the other. The situation for social science education has thus become increasingly strained. Social science professors hope to influence the state to increase the founding, UNT (2013-10-26); HSV (2013-10-26).

Having taken initiative to, developed, implemented, and during five years managed two bachelor and one master (one- and two-year) programs in marketing, I also participated in the self-evaluation of these in the summer of 2011, which was part of the requirement of The Swedish National Agency for Higher Education, now The Swedish Higher Education Authority. The programs were based on a very clear ideas on subject ”progression”.The self-evaluation provoked a revision to improve the methodological progression of the programs. But it was evident that these changes were not enough.

From this background we face four problems that motivate the need for entrepreneurial learning in higher education:

Very complex requirements from stakeholders

Limited resource allocation, need to become more efficient

Low quality of present education

The need to build structural capital to become more efficient

To deal with these problems we assume some core ideas:

It is necessary to strengthen the integrity of the program. 

To make higher education more efficient we have to build structural capital.

Based on a ’Vygotskian’ view on pedagogics, it is necessary:

The program must be broken down to courses and then to moments of proximal development that are gradually widening during the program. 

To develop methods to identify for each individual student’s ’zone of proximal development’, se below, which is both possible for the student to span and which is challenging enough.

To develop the ’caring’ aspects of the teacher – student relation.

In the following text we develop our view concerning these problems, and explain why we have chosen these core ideas. 

The first part deals with the complex requirements on higher education. Concept maps are introduced as a tool for understanding and handle complexity. This part explains why we focus on structural capital. 

The second part deals with the pedagogic foundations of the project. In this part we explain the methods we want to use to strengthen the quality in higher education. ’The zone of proximal development’ is used to explain how entrepreneurial learning can be achieved in higher education, and why we focus on the relationship between student and teacher. 

The last part deals with thoughts about how we can build and use structural capital in higher education to make education more efficient and give students more time with teachers.

Keywords
Higher education, zone of proximal development, tacit knowing, scaffolding, expanding learning environment
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-20132 (URN)
Conference
Lärarlärdom 2015, 19 August 2015, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden
Available from: 2015-08-20 Created: 2015-08-20 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Philipson, S., Johansson, J. & Schley, D. (2015). Global corporate governance: the maelstrom of increased complexity - is it possible to learn to ride the dragon?. In: Vrontis D., Weber Y., Tsoukatos E. (Ed.), 8th Annual Conference of the EuroMed Academy of Business: Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Sustainable Value Chain in a Dynamic Environment. Paper presented at 8th Annual Conference of the EuroMed Academy of Business, Verona, Italy, 16-18 September 2015 (pp. 1335-1349). EuroMed Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global corporate governance: the maelstrom of increased complexity - is it possible to learn to ride the dragon?
2015 (English)In: 8th Annual Conference of the EuroMed Academy of Business: Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Sustainable Value Chain in a Dynamic Environment / [ed] Vrontis D., Weber Y., Tsoukatos E., EuroMed Press , 2015, p. 1335-1349Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This current paper addresses various aspects of the role of accounting for management control and discusses the limits of current management control systems. The paper draws on the discussion of accounting relevance of the current accounting assumptions for use in management control that receives consequences on corporate governance. Focus is on the boundaries of information, limiting the control of management and the possibility of improving corporate governance. It identifies, based on previous studies weaknesses in the practices and conceptualization of the going concern concept. Institutionalized thoughts and actions are identified as embodied in rituals and routines, where the accounting rituals are used in decision-making. Based on increasing volatility in the environment and the competence needed to adapt to the environment, it is argued that traditional accounting rituals are unsuitable for many companies. The paper indicates a need for de-institutionalization and reconsidering of accounting practices and thus particularly the assumption of going concern.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
EuroMed Press, 2015
Keywords
accounting, complexity, corporate governance, going-concern, management control, information use, innovation, volatility, uncertainty
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-20027 (URN)000371316100123 ()978-9963-711-37-6 (ISBN)
Conference
8th Annual Conference of the EuroMed Academy of Business, Verona, Italy, 16-18 September 2015
Available from: 2015-07-15 Created: 2015-07-15 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Philipson, S. (2015). The concept of bah – Limits of Knowledge Management Theory. In: : . Paper presented at 2015 ICAM/ICSI Joint International Conferences, Boston, MA, July 22-25.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The concept of bah – Limits of Knowledge Management Theory
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This conceptual paper gives a new interpretation of knowledge management, based on Vygotskian psychology, critiquing the dominating paradigm of Nonaka. We question the role of individual and organizational learning and creation in his model; thus proposing a whole new focus for knowledge management research and radical managerial consequences for practitioners.

The paper presents the work of Nonaka and associates from 1994 and forward and the limited critique that have appeared in press.

It identifies the major flaws of Nonaka’s theory, as 

  1. The eclecticism,
  2. The reductionism, Individual and organisational learning to be understood by one model,
  3. The behaviourist and cognitive psychological underpinning,
  4. The flawed understanding of tacit knowledge.

As an alternative is presented a model of individual learning based on a Vygotskyan psychology and some of the implications organisational learning.

The findings of the paper

The paper shows 

  1. how much more complex than perceived by Nonaka and associates, it is to access tacit knowledge and 
  2. discusses methods of accessing it, 
  3. the limits of these methods and 
  4. what to do when it cannot be accessed.
Keywords
Innovation, Knowledge Management, Tacit knowledge
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-20028 (URN)
Conference
2015 ICAM/ICSI Joint International Conferences, Boston, MA, July 22-25
Available from: 2015-07-15 Created: 2015-07-15 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Philipson, S. (2014). Entrepreneurial Learning in Higher Education. In: : . Paper presented at 21st Annual International Conference on Advances in Management & 7th International Conference on Social Intelligence, Los Angeles, July 16–19, 2014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Entrepreneurial Learning in Higher Education
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This article proposes to build a entrepreneurial learning environment for future business professionals, based on a better knowledge about requirements and the economic necessity to build structural capital in higher education.

Keywords
Learning, Entrepreneurial, Higher Education, Vygotsky
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-18265 (URN)
Conference
21st Annual International Conference on Advances in Management & 7th International Conference on Social Intelligence, Los Angeles, July 16–19, 2014
Available from: 2014-12-04 Created: 2014-12-04 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3323-907X

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