hig.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Eklinder-Frick, JensORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7156-5020
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 18) Show all publications
Eklinder-Frick, J. & Åge, L.-J. (2017). Perspectives on regional innovation policy: from new economic geography towards the IMP approach. Industrial Marketing Management, 61, 81-92
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perspectives on regional innovation policy: from new economic geography towards the IMP approach
2017 (English)In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 61, p. 81-92Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The European Union has the aim of becoming the world's most competitive and knowledge-based economy, which entails investments in industry agglomeration. However, these investments have had limited impact. This conceptual paper problematizes the new economic geography terminology used in policy and, more specifically, the way that the key concepts of "industry agglomeration," "social capital," "knowledge," and "innovation" are conceptualized. By adding the perspective of the industrial network or industrial marketing and purchasing (IMP) approach, this paper contributes to a more nuanced understanding of how to facilitate innovation within regional policy. Since the IMP approach offers an organizational-level perspective, including such a perspective will help make the EU's policies more practically applicable. We propose that regional policy should pay more attention to the socio-material resource interaction between the actors involved in the cluster initiatives. This would shift the focus away from creating spillover effects of knowledge towards viewing knowledge as a performative construct that is inseparable from the specific resource interaction in which it is embedded. Also, the definition of innovation within policy could benefit from being reconceptualized as the processual use within producer-user relationships. 

National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-22832 (URN)10.1016/j.indmarman.2016.07.005 (DOI)000399623000009 ()2-s2.0-84994130014 (Scopus ID)
Projects
ISNET
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20150221
Available from: 2016-11-25 Created: 2016-11-25 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Agndal, H., Åge, L.-J. & Eklinder-Frick, J. (2017). Two decades of business negotiation research: an overview and suggestions for future studies. The journal of business & industrial marketing, 32(4), 487-504
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Two decades of business negotiation research: an overview and suggestions for future studies
2017 (English)In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, ISSN 0885-8624, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 487-504Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This article present a review of articles on business negotiation published between 1995 and 2015.

Design/methodology/approach: This literature review is based on 490 article on business negotiation.

Findings: When analyzing the conceptual underpinnings of this field, two paradigms emerge as dominant. The most prominent paradigm is a cognitive, psychological approach, typically relying on experiments and statistical testing of findings. The second dominating paradigm is a behavioral one, largely concerned with mathematical modelling and game-theoretical models.

Practical implications: Besides offering a description of the characteristics adhered to the business negotiation field, this paper will also suggest recommendations for further research and specify areas in which the research field needs further conceptual and empirical development.

Originality/value: This literature review serves to be the first representation of the characteristics adhered to the budding research field of business negotiation.

Keywords
Negotiation, Literature review, Business negotiation
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23961 (URN)10.1108/JBIM-11-2015-0233 (DOI)000404812500002 ()2-s2.0-85020105566 (Scopus ID)
Projects
ISNET
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20150221
Available from: 2017-05-02 Created: 2017-05-02 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Fremont, V., Eklinder-Frick, J., Åge, L.-J. & Osarenkhoe, A. (2017). Understanding interaction through boundary objects: How digitalization affects activity coordination. In: : . Paper presented at 22nd CBIM Academic Workshop, Center for Business & Industrial Marketing, Stockholm Business School, Stockholm, Sweden, 19-21 June 2017..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding interaction through boundary objects: How digitalization affects activity coordination
2017 (English)In: , 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This study focus on analyzing interaction processes and their effects on activity coordination through the lens of boundary objects. The empirical setting is organizations that are trying to enhance their competitive advantage by technological innovation and the use of big data.This study also contributes by addressing the cognitive dimensions of interactions by analyzing how activity links are being viewed by the involved actors based on their perceptions of the boundary objects.

National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23943 (URN)
Conference
22nd CBIM Academic Workshop, Center for Business & Industrial Marketing, Stockholm Business School, Stockholm, Sweden, 19-21 June 2017.
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20150221
Available from: 2017-04-28 Created: 2017-04-28 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Eklinder-Frick, J. O. (2016). Clustering or interacting for knowledge? -: towards an entangled view of knowledge in regional growth policy. The IMP Journal, 10(2), 221-242
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clustering or interacting for knowledge? -: towards an entangled view of knowledge in regional growth policy
2016 (English)In: The IMP Journal, ISSN 2059-1403, E-ISSN 0809-7259, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 221-242Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The European Union has an ambition to become the worlds most competitive and knowledge-based economy, which entails investments in cluster initiatives. Most researchers however find that such investments have had limited impact. The notion of creating industrial clusters is influenced by the discourse within new economic geography in which research interests are geared towards facilitating knowledge exchange between industry, university and government. In order to understand how knowledge is created and enacted within a cluster initiative this paper investigates the interactions between actors participating in a specific innovation process.

Design/methodology/approach: The studied cluster initiative is one of the 55 clusters designated as demonstrating highly sophisticated cluster management by European Union officials, making it an interesting case study for knowledge creation in such environments. The case study entails semi-structured in depth interviews of 24 respondents.

Findings: The cluster approach encourages a “disentangled” view of knowledge where knowledge is seen as universal and cognitive and therefore possible to disentangle from the context in which it was initially produced. However, my findings suggest that in practice knowledge is “entangled” in the specific context in which it is enacted and produced. Thus, in practice knowledge is a contextually limited and practical activity that is being enacted when heterogeneous resources interact in producer-user interfaces. This mismatch between strategy and outcome may subsequently help to explain the limited impact of policy on regional growth.

Keywords
Policy, Network, Cluster, Knowledge, IMP, Economic geography
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-21504 (URN)10.1108/IMP-08-2015-0042 (DOI)
Projects
ISNET
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20150221
Available from: 2016-05-17 Created: 2016-05-17 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Eklinder Frick, J. & Åge, L.-J. (2016). ”Happy-happy” business negotiation – agreements beyond ”win-win”. In: Proceedings of the 32nd Annual IMP Conference: Change and Transformation of Markets, Networks and Relationships. Paper presented at The 32nd Annual IMP Conference, Change and Transformation of Markets, Networks and Relationships, 30th August - 3rd September 2016, Poland,.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>”Happy-happy” business negotiation – agreements beyond ”win-win”
2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the 32nd Annual IMP Conference: Change and Transformation of Markets, Networks and Relationships, 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Research background - describes the business negotiation literature as historically dominated by a transactional perspective, which has affected the conceptual discourse as well as the scope of interest for empirical studies. Assumptions that arise from this transactional perspective includes the notion that (1) business negotiations are a linear process that follows episodic or stage models. (2) That business negotiations are geared towards an outcome in the form of a one-time exchange. (3) That the value of the negotiation outcome is often expressed in economic or mathematical terms. (4) That negotiation research focuses on the single negotiator or negotiation in a dyad. (5) That the research historically has viewed negotiation as a “zero-sum” game. Viewed from an interactional perspective, influenced by IMP theory, there is good reason to challenge these five assumptions within the business negotiation literature. The interactional perspective goes beyond the dyadic perspective and views value creation as emanating from the mutual adaptation of resources that takes place between several interacting actors within a network context: a view that is incompatible with the five assumptions posed above. Methods – This is a theoretical paper. The purpose of this paper - is to analyse and discuss the differences in the way that central aspects of negotiations such as the process, outcome, value, actors and resources are conceptualized in both the business negotiation and in the IMP literature. Also, we will discuss and analyze managerial implications that come from the inclusion of IMP perspective into the business negotiation research. The main contribution of this paper – is to divide the business negotiation literature into the transactional and interactional perspectives and then discusses the concept of “win-win” and the way it is used in negotiation research. An alternative concept is suggested to describe that negotiations is non-linear and focusing on mutual interdependence, emphasizes value creation, networks and mutual adaptations. This concept is thus more interactional and is dubbed “happy-happy” negotiation outcome.

Keywords
Business negotiation, win-win, interactional perspective, negotiation outcome
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25084 (URN)
Conference
The 32nd Annual IMP Conference, Change and Transformation of Markets, Networks and Relationships, 30th August - 3rd September 2016, Poland,
Available from: 2017-08-22 Created: 2017-08-22 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Eklinder-Frick, J. & Åge, L.-J. (2016). Transactional and interactional perspectives on business negotiation. In: Peter J. Batt (Ed.), IMP ASIA in Africa: Book of Abstracts. Paper presented at IMP ASIA in Africa - The 7th meeting of the IMP Group in Asia and 1st meeting of IMP Group in Africa, 4th-7th December 2016, Cape Town, South Africa (pp. 21). Industrial Marketing and Purchasing Group
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transactional and interactional perspectives on business negotiation
2016 (English)In: IMP ASIA in Africa: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Peter J. Batt, Industrial Marketing and Purchasing Group , 2016, p. 21-Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A transactional perspective has historically dominated the business negotiation literature. Assumptions which arise from this transactional perspective include the notion that: (i) business negotiations are a linear process that follow episodic or stage models; (ii) business negotiations are geared towards an outcome in the form of a one-time transaction; (iii) the value of the negotiation outcome is often expressed in economic or mathematical terms; (iv) negotiation research focuses on the single negotiator or negotiation in a dyad; and (v) research historically has viewed negotiation as a "zero-sum" game. Viewed from the interaction approach within the IMP perspective, there is good reason to challenge these five assumptions within the business negotiation literature. The purpose of this conceptual paper is to analyse and discuss the differences in the way that central aspects of business negotiations such as the process, outcome, value creation, involved actors and resource allocation are conceptualized in both the business negotiation and the IMP literature. The conceptual deliberation concludes that business negotiation research has thus far tended to focus on individual skills and the examination of isolated dyadic interactions. Business negotiation research largely ignores the fact that the nature of industrial business is predominantly relationship-based rather than transactional. Introducing the relational perspective of the IMP tradition into business negotiation research would help in furthering the critique already posed within this stream of research towards its transactional, linear and dyadic focus. Viewing business negotiation through an interactional perspective will further managers understanding of the negotiation process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Industrial Marketing and Purchasing Group, 2016
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23139 (URN)
Conference
IMP ASIA in Africa - The 7th meeting of the IMP Group in Asia and 1st meeting of IMP Group in Africa, 4th-7th December 2016, Cape Town, South Africa
Projects
ISNET
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20150221
Available from: 2016-12-22 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Eklinder-Frick, J. (2015). Development, production and use in policy initiated innovation. The journal of business & industrial marketing, 30(8), 973-986
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development, production and use in policy initiated innovation
2015 (English)In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 973-986Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore and describe the forces which promote or obstruct a policy initiated innovation process in the context of a regional strategic network (RSN). Design/methodology/approach An innovation requires that an invention survives in relevant developing, producing, and using settings. This is analyzed as resource interaction in these three settings. Data are obtained from a case study of an innovation process undertaken from 2007 to 2011 where 24 respondents representing the involved actors in the development of a GIS technology platform were interviewed in separate meetings lasting 60-100 minutes. Primary sources of secondary data have also been analyzed. Findings The strategy imposed by the RSN enabled knowledge to be exchanged between the involved actors but problems remained regarding resource interaction of the relevant settings. The studied case showed that achieving resource interaction between the producing and using settings was particularly challenging when the innovation processes is policy initiated and thus involves both private and public sector. This serves to explain why policy initiatives to turn scientific knowledge into commercialized innovation often fall short of their objectives. Originality/value Research investigating policy initiated innovation and regional economic growth often focus on achieving information exchange between the actors that make up the innovation systems. This paper sheds light on the resource interaction between the members of regional strategic networks and how his can facilitate innovation processes.

Keywords
Innovation processes, Inter-organizational networks, Regional strategic network, Resource interaction
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-20079 (URN)10.1108/JBIM-05-2014-0109 (DOI)000368430900008 ()2-s2.0-84939806103 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-08-10 Created: 2015-08-10 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Eklinder-Frick, J., Eriksson, L. T. & Hallén, L. (2015). Social Capital, Individuality and Identity. In: : . Paper presented at 31st IMP Conference, 27-29 August 2015, University of Southern Denmark, Kolding, Denmark.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social Capital, Individuality and Identity
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-19586 (URN)
Conference
31st IMP Conference, 27-29 August 2015, University of Southern Denmark, Kolding, Denmark
Available from: 2015-06-11 Created: 2015-06-11 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Eklinder-Frick, J., Eriksson, L. T. & Hallén, L. (2014). Multidimensional social capital as a boost or a bar to innovativeness. Industrial Marketing Management, 43(3), 460-472
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multidimensional social capital as a boost or a bar to innovativeness
2014 (English)In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 460-472Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Innovation does not only demand new ideas, financial resources and knowledge of supplier and user systems, but is also influenced by social capital which has an impact on the innovativeness in business networks. However, social capital is often vague, at times described as a “catch-all notion”. In this paper definitions of social capital are suggested to support the management of innovation in networks. Three dimensions of social capital are ap- plied in a case study of a regional strategic network – the socio-economic, the structural and the actor-oriented dimensions – while focusing on the last one. Data were collected at two points in time, at the start of the regional strategic network in 2004 and at the end of the project in 2010. The application of the concepts and the compar- ison between these two points in time highlight the influence of social capital and how it can hinder or be used to promote innovation processes. 

Keywords
Social capital, Innovation, Bridging, Bonding, Cluster initiatives
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-16415 (URN)10.1016/j.indmarman.2013.12.014 (DOI)000337661300012 ()2-s2.0-84900502081 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-03-13 Created: 2014-03-13 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Eklinder-Frick, J. (2014). Sowing seeds for innovation: The impact of social capital in regional strategic networks. (Doctoral dissertation). Västerås: Mälardalen University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sowing seeds for innovation: The impact of social capital in regional strategic networks
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In order to promote regional innovation and stronger social coherence the European Union has set goals to become the world’s most competitive, dynamic, and knowledge-based economy. These ambitious goals are supported by funds allocated to regional strategic networks (also called cluster initiatives). Usually, the management of regional strategic networks is left to the discretion of the project leaders. However, the industry agglomeration model which constitutes the foundation for regional development policies fails to consider the social context. It also overemphasizes the relevance of a linear approach towards innovation which is problematic, as this fails to consider the conditions for implementation in different contexts.

This thesis builds upon data from two case studies of regional strategic networks (Firsam at Söderhamn and FPX at Gävle) and serves to describe (1) how the management group of an RSN creates the prerequisite for an innovative milieu by analyzing the effects that social capital imposes on social interaction, and (2) how a policy initiated innovation process is supported by an RSN management group by analyzing resource interaction between the developing, producing and using settings.

As a conclusion it is stated that a manager of a regional strategic network should balance the bridging and bonding forces that social capital produces. Under some circumstances it might be advantageous to form tightly knit groups that can foster trust and cultural proximity. In other cases loosely knit groups might be preferable where novel information is exchanged between previously unconnected actors. Also, the innovation construct is applied in the thesis to denote the process where resources are combined in new ways within existing structures to offer new solutions in the market. The manager of a regional strategic network must consider not only the setting in which an invention is developed but also the settings where new solutions are converted into products and those where they are brought to use.

The performance of the investigated development initiatives indicates that merely funding regional strategic networks is insufficient to spur regional growth. It is not as easy as merely sowing seed for innovation; it must also fall on good soil. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Västerås: Mälardalen University, 2014. p. 87
Series
Mälardalen University Press Dissertations, ISSN 1651-4238 ; 155
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Economics and Organisations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-18215 (URN)978-91-7485-141-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-04-23, Pi, Mälardalens högskola, Västerås, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2014-11-28 Created: 2014-11-28 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7156-5020

Search in DiVA

Show all publications