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Edling, S. & Liljestrand, J. (2019). “Democracy for me is saying what I want”: The teaching profession on free speech, democratic mission and the notion of political correctness in a Swedish context. In: Andrea Raiker, Matti Rautiainen & Blerim Saqipi (Ed.), Teacher education and the development of democratic citizenship in Europe: . Taylor & Francis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Democracy for me is saying what I want”: The teaching profession on free speech, democratic mission and the notion of political correctness in a Swedish context
2019 (English)In: Teacher education and the development of democratic citizenship in Europe / [ed] Andrea Raiker, Matti Rautiainen & Blerim Saqipi, Taylor & Francis, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30536 (URN)
Note

Forthcoming

Available from: 2019-08-21 Created: 2019-08-21 Last updated: 2019-08-26Bibliographically approved
Liljestrand, J. (2019). Förskollärares professionella undervisningskunskap. In: Kerstin Bäckman, Annika Elm, Lena O Magnusson (Ed.), Förskola, barn och lärande – didaktik i förskolan: . Liber
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Förskollärares professionella undervisningskunskap
2019 (Swedish)In: Förskola, barn och lärande – didaktik i förskolan / [ed] Kerstin Bäckman, Annika Elm, Lena O Magnusson, Liber, 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

I kapitlet visas hur förskollärare har utvecklat professionell kunskap om undervisning i förskolan. Kapitlet fokuserar hur spänningen mellan ämnescentrering och barncentrering i läroplanen hanteras av förskollärare i deras praktiska arbete. Med grund i en intervjustudie kunde deras tillvägagångssätt sammanfattas i fyra didaktiska kategorier som åsyftar ett medvetet arrangemang för barns lärande. Jag hävdar i kapitlet att förskollärare kan förstås som särskild grupp lärare som undervisar i förskolans sammanhang. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Liber, 2019
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29679 (URN)
Note

Under utgivning

Available from: 2019-06-06 Created: 2019-06-06 Last updated: 2019-08-08Bibliographically approved
Liljestrand, J., Carlsson, D. & Thalén, P. (2019). Images of Christianity in teaching materials for the Swedish compulsory school. In: : . Paper presented at Nordic Conference of Religious Education, 11-14 June 2019, Trondheim, Norway.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Images of Christianity in teaching materials for the Swedish compulsory school
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The objective to teach Christianity is stated in the Swedish national syllabus for RE since the very beginning of compulsory school. Actually, the syllabus from a century ago states teaching both about, and in, the Lutheran catechesis – a mission that was successively replaced by biblical studies and later developed into the subject “Religionskunskap”. The latter in which Christianity was only one of several (foremost world-)religions and prominent views of life. However, the mission to pay a certain weight to Christianity has survived although in a new and (post)secular context. The privilege of Christianity is today typically motivated by its cultural position rather than from a religious or moral rationale. 

In the Swedish context, in which Religionskunskap is a mandatory school subject, students are engaged in teaching and learning Christianity back and forth during their compulsory period of school. Widening the context from the school system, there has been debates regarding the status of Christianity in the Swedish RE syllabus. A common argument in defence of the privileged position of Christianity is the importance of a “Christian common heritage”. One way to address how students are engaged with Christianity on the arena of compulsory education is to investigate teaching materials currently used in school. The purpose of our paper is to investigate the depiction of Christianity in current and widely used Swedish teaching materials. Using discourse analysis, prominent and dominating discourses will be revealed. The results from the analysis will be used to reflect on and discuss the position of Christianity in Swedish schools within a cultural-historical context in Sweden and Europe.

National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29200 (URN)
Conference
Nordic Conference of Religious Education, 11-14 June 2019, Trondheim, Norway
Available from: 2019-01-29 Created: 2019-01-29 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved
Liljestrand, J., Elm, A., Johansson, U.-A. & Mårtensson, K. (2019). Introducing and exploring student teachers use of digital tools – preliminary results from a development project. In: : . Paper presented at ATEE Annual Conference 'Teacher Education in a changing global context', 13-16 August 2019, Bath, UK.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introducing and exploring student teachers use of digital tools – preliminary results from a development project
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In Sweden, as well as in other countries, the digital revolution has impacted society profoundly (Brynjolfsson & MacAffe, 2015). The digital evolution, or revolution, has created a need of new digital competences for both teachers in preschools, elementary school, secondary school, upper secondary school and higher education (Ministry of Enterprise and Innovation, 2017). These digital competences both include technological and pedagogical knowledge in order to teach successfully in the digital society (e.g. Davies et al 1997; Granberg 2010; Instefjord & Munthe 2016).

There is a need to develop TE in order to meet this challenge. The aim of our development project, running during one semester (autumn 2018) was to contribute to innovation in teacher education through a conscious use of digital technology. The concept of TPACK is employed as a tool to explore the ways in which technology impacts on what is learned in TE. The following research questions are formulated: In what ways does the use of ICT contribute to student teachers planning and reflecting regarding their teaching in school? What added pedagogical values in teacher education practice can be discerned from the perspective of the student teachers in this project?   

Our theoretical framework is based on Koehler & Mishra’s (2009) concept of technological content knowledge, TPACK. The notion of TPACK is bringing together 1) content knowledge and 2) pedagogical content knowledge with the impact of technology on these two dimensions. Furthermore, TPACK-analysis involves consideration about the contextual conditions contributing to how these three key dimensions interacts.

The students were introduced to the project. Research ethical considerations were made in accordance with The Swedish Research Council’s guidelines. Data comprises anonymized course materials without any information about the students; course evaluations and course assignments, the former anonymized by origin and the latter anonymized in retrospect. In the surveys, data is collected through open-question, individual surveys distributed to student teachers in three different courses at different levels in the TE-program for primary school. The open questions are highlighting possible new experiences of using digital resources as a resource in teacher education and for teaching in school. We have also analysed TE-students course assignments in which students describe their lesson plans, including the digital design, involved in their teaching design. Both the course assignments and the course evaluations has been coded according to qualitative content analysis focussing on the dimension of TPACK. The written documents was read several times in order to discern recurrent themes. After this stage of qualitative analysis, overall patterns of frequencies will be taking into account in order to relate to earlier comparable studies.

Our preliminary results (further results will be presented in August 2019) shows that student teachers tend to focus on the tools themselves and their inherent qualities. However, there are also indications of how the digital technology enables representations that highlight spatial dimensions of teaching content such as the movement of animal bodies, or three-dimensional representations of planets. One contextual setting shaping these student approaches is related to the structure and progression of the TE-program, with both possibilities and limitations for digital learning.

Our results are pointing to the need of focussing on critical aspects, i.e. the framing of teaching content and added pedagogical values, through introducing the work with digital tools and their implications for teaching content, systematically and early in the TE-programme.  The TPACK-concept involves challenges but also provides an important resource for this purpose. Our exploration intend to shed light on how this could be done in TE as earlier research also seem to confirm this challenge (Voogt & McKenney 2017).   

National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29587 (URN)
Conference
ATEE Annual Conference 'Teacher Education in a changing global context', 13-16 August 2019, Bath, UK
Note

Forthcoming

Available from: 2019-05-22 Created: 2019-05-22 Last updated: 2019-08-08Bibliographically approved
Edling, S. & Liljestrand, J. (2019). Let’s talk about teacher education!: Analysing the media debates in 2016-2017 on teacher education using Sweden as a case. Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Let’s talk about teacher education!: Analysing the media debates in 2016-2017 on teacher education using Sweden as a case
2019 (English)In: Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education, ISSN 1359-866X, E-ISSN 1469-2945Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the paper is to contribute to research on themedia’s role in naming and framing the debate about teachereducation using Sweden as a case study. This is done by analysinghow articles published in four major Swedish newspapers from2016–2017 define: a) the challenges/strengths of current teachereducation and b) the kind of teacher professionalism that thedescriptions give rise to. Using content analysis, the study showsthat the media mainly emphasises the negative aspects of teachereducation and, in particular, scepticism of the scientific basiswhere postmodernism is regarded as problematic and needingto be replaced by cognitive science due to the insufficient knowledgeof teachers and student teachers, the shortage of teachers inthe country as a whole and disciplinary problems in the classroom.The debate is primarily fuelled by those outside the field ofeducational research, who argue that psychology and neurosciencescholars should have the power to define the contentof education, which indicates a view of professionalism as insideout-professionalism. There are more nuanced approaches to teachereducation as well, but these are marginalised.

Keywords
Teacher education; Sweden; the media; naming and framing; teacher professionalism; content analysis
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30451 (URN)10.1080/1359866X.2019.1631255 (DOI)000478137300001 ()2-s2.0-85068206596 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-29 Created: 2019-07-29 Last updated: 2019-08-22Bibliographically approved
Liljestrand, J. (2019). Maintaining and Transforming Bridging Capital in a Swedish Interreligious Youth Project. In: Ipgrave, Julia (Ed.), Interreligious Engagement in Urban Spaces: Social, material and ideological dimensions. Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maintaining and Transforming Bridging Capital in a Swedish Interreligious Youth Project
2019 (English)In: Interreligious Engagement in Urban Spaces: Social, material and ideological dimensions / [ed] Ipgrave, Julia, Springer, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this case study of an interreligious youth project social capital is understood as an individual disposition, i.e. the participants in the study rely on their former and parallel experiences of capital as a social resource. In order to maintain the project as a sustainable network, norms and sanctions that are adapted to particular situations by means of relations work supporting social trust, are necessary. The study has shown that social capital is a vulnerable category that needs to be maintained by conducted bridging capital. Bonding capital contributes to bridging capital, but also seems to create a complex relationship between them. This is due to the fact that bonding operates through another selective logic than bridging capital, namely the bolstering of the (more) narrow social self. Norms and sanctions are the basic components for achieving bridging capital, although bonding also operates within partly excluding bonding mechanisms. 

Keywords: youth project; individual disposition; conducted capital; norms; sanctions; excluding bonding 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29305 (URN)978-3-030-16796-7 (DOI)978-3-030-16796-7 (ISBN)
Note

Forthcoming

Available from: 2019-02-18 Created: 2019-02-18 Last updated: 2019-10-22Bibliographically approved
Elm, A. & Liljestrand, J. (2019). Preschool Teachers´ Professional Development : Teachers and Researchers in Collaboration. In: ECER 2019: Abstracts. Paper presented at ECER 'Education in an Era of Risk – the Role of Educational Research for the Future', 3-6 September, 2019, Hamburg, Germany. , Article ID 468.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preschool Teachers´ Professional Development : Teachers and Researchers in Collaboration
2019 (English)In: ECER 2019: Abstracts, 2019, article id 468Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

As in many other European countries early childhood education, including preschool, includes teaching in the area of subject knowledge. In Sweden this is related to a changed policy in order to connect preschool with the school system. Since 2011, “teaching” has been established as a new aspect of the preschool’s mandate and, since 2010, subjects like maths, science have been added to the national syllabus. Earlier, subjects has also been part of a preschool tradition already present in Fröbel’s kindergarten. In this earlier approach the intention was not to prepare for the forthcoming school and its subject content. Today, the national preschool syllabus has subject goals that overlaps with those of the school, often stated in a rather detailed, academic form. In addition, the Swedish school inspectorate has also included the preschools in its evaluations. According to the Swedish education act, practice should be based on scientific knowledge and proven experience. These changed directives comes with increasing expectations and demands on the preschool teacher profession for implementing this assignment. In light of this background we aim to support the preschool teachers to develop a professional and inside-out based (Stanley & Stronach 2013) knowledge for acting as professionals in this changed context. In this contribution we will direct our interest on the subject area of science and technology.

Previous research has identified possibilities or lack of possibilities for science and technology learning in early childhood environments, with a tendency to a ‘diagnostic’ approach to preschool teacher knowledge. However, this research does not go far enough in investigating programs for developing preschool teachers´ science content knowledge (e.g. Nilsson, 2014; Fleer, 2009; Nilsson & Elm, 2017). Against the background of the need for including preschool teachers experiences and knowledge in a fair way (cf. Berry et al. 2008), while simultaneously recognize the need of further development in subject content, in the institutional frame of the preschool, we will address preschool teachers pedagogic content knowledge (PCK). The latter (PCK) refers to teachers´ understanding of the content and experiences and attitudes towards science. Our research question reads: In what ways can collaboration between preschool teachers´ and researchers contribute to preschool teachers’ professional learning and preschool development with special regard to preschool teachers’ pedagogic content knowledge?

Our methodological approach is guided by Participatory Action Research (PAR) highlighting the need of a democratic process, developing of practical knowledge related to issues that are of great concern for the participants (Reason & Bradbury 2001). Furthermore, PAR recognizes our partners’ knowledge and experiences as a vital element to be brought into the research process (Brydon-Miller, Greenwood & Maguire, 2003). Thus, an important factor is the interaction between the researcher and the interests within the educational field, in order to promote both researchers and the practitioners work and goals. From this starting point there is initially an explicitly stated drive to meet on equal terms and to support each other to develop.

The other leg, pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) includes teachers’ understanding of how children learn, or fail to learn; in relation to this specific subject matter has been found to be an important matter. That is, a perspective on professional development that focus on preschool teachers´ understanding of the content, pedagogical content knowledge and attitudes towards science (cf. Schulman, 1987; Van Driel & Berry, 2012). Representation of teacher content knowledge (CoRe) by means of a commonly developed table, is systematically used as a tool to trigger preschool teachers´ ideas of both science and technology content as a tool for development and cooperation.

Methodology or Methods/ Research Instruments or Sources Used

9 preschool teachers during 1,5 year (currently ongoing) participates in the research project which includes both indoors- and outdoors activities focusing on technology and science content, paying attention to children’s perspectives. The teachers are meeting in reflective group sessions once a month. For this paper data was collected through a qualitative approach consisting of 23 + 29 hours recorded semi structured interviews with the participating preschool teachers from one preschool unit. The interviews were conducted after the first and third semester of participation. Data was then analysed out from thematic content analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2006).

As Braun and Clarke (2006) argue, it is a method that requires researchers to be clear about what they do, why they do it and how the analysis is conducted. The analyses of the data in this study were part of an inductive process from a) transcription → b) identifying emergent initial codes → c) searching for themes → d) reviewing and revising themes → e) defining and naming themes → f) formulating the result (with the starting point in identified and named themes). First, the interviews were transcribed verbatim. Some of the statements made in the interviews that did not correspond to the subject were not transcribed. Second, the data was read, and assigned initial codes.

The third step involved searching for overall themes, based on the initial codes. In this step, the researchers sorted the data under each theme separately. In the fourth step themes were compared, data were reviewed the themes revised. In this process, similarities were identified in the themes that had emerged in the analysis of the interviews. Related examples of the participants’ learning were examined and refined until consensus was reached. Fifth, to establish the validity of the coding and identified themes, the authors worked to finally define and name the themes. The main data was then compared with the themes and provided a critical overview in terms of aspects being overemphasised, under represented, too vague or biased. The final step in the analysis, with a starting point in the themes, was to formulate the results.

Conclusions, Expected Outcomes or Findings

Our results from the interview data shows that the use of CoRe:s contribute to focus on the specific content in a more systematic way. Some of the preschool teachers expressed how the use of the CoRe:s and the formulation of ‘Big Ideas’ supported them to establish the fundamental ideas of the topic they were teaching. With documentation in CoRe preschool teachers have been able to make visible aspects of their own practice and to see the educational value of a current situation. In their collegial work, the documentation of CoRe contributes to the preschool teachers distancing themselves from their daily practices and makes them evaluate their actions and activities. Further, the use of CoRE seems to provide a different point for innovative change in the preschool development. In this way, the collective knowledge of a team becomes qualitatively different to that of a single individual. In addition, other themes also comprises: improved knowledge of processes for planning; visibility of different aspects in the daily practice and in children's learning processes; a broader view connected to international and national development in preschool and society, and a practice on scientific basis.

 Our research contributes with how “teachers and other professionals on the field of education learn and develop throughout their professional career” in the developing field of early childhood education and its rising expectation of subject knowledge. We also attempt to show how teacher development and the research process is dependent on their reciprocal development in order to be accomplished. In a time characterized by rapid policy changes in the educational systems in Europe, the need for practitioner-researcher collaborations supporting professionalism based on conscious professional agency is of great concern.

References

Berry, A., Loughran, J. & van Driel, J.H. (2008) Revisiting the Roots of Pedagogical Content Knowledge. International Journal of Science Education, 30:10, 1271-1279.

Braun, V. & Clarke, V. (2006). Using thematic analysis in psychology. Qualitative Research in Psychology, vol. 3. (2). p. 77-101.

Brydon-Miller, M., Greenwood, D. & Maguire, P. (2003). Why action research? Action Research, vol. 1. (1). p. 9-28.

Fleer, M. (2009). Supporting scientific conceptual consciousness or learning in ‘a Roundabout Way’ in play-based contexts. International Journal of Science Education, 31(8), p. 1069–1089.

Nilsson, P. (2014). When Teaching Makes a Difference: Developing science teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge through learning study. International Journal of Science Education, 36(11), 1794-1814.

Nilsson, P. & Elm, A. (2016). Capturing and developing early childhood teachers´ science Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) through CoRes. International Journal of Science Education, 28 (5), 406-424.

Reason, P & Bradbury, H (2001). Introduction: Inquiry and participation in search of a world worthy of human aspiration. Peter Reason & Hilary Bradbury (eds.) Handbook of Action Research. London: SAGE.

Skolverket (2011). Curriculum for the preschool Lpfö98. www.skolverket.se

Shulman, L. S. (1987). Knowledge and teaching: Foundations of the new reform. Harvard Educational Review, 57, 1-22.

Stanley, E. and, & Stronach, I. (2013) Raising and doubling ‘standards' in professional discourse: a critical bid. Journal of Educational Policy, 28(3), pp. 291-305.

van Driel, J. H., & Berry, A. K. (2012). Teacher professional development focusing on pedagogical content knowledge. Educational Researcher, 41(1), 26 - 28.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29430 (URN)
Conference
ECER 'Education in an Era of Risk – the Role of Educational Research for the Future', 3-6 September, 2019, Hamburg, Germany
Available from: 2019-04-01 Created: 2019-04-01 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved
Liljestrand, J. (2019). Religious Thinking Case Study 1: Dialogue Discussion Group. In: Ipgrave, Julia (Ed.), Interreligious Engagement in Urban Spaces: Social, material and ideological dimensions. Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Religious Thinking Case Study 1: Dialogue Discussion Group
2019 (English)In: Interreligious Engagement in Urban Spaces: Social, material and ideological dimensions / [ed] Ipgrave, Julia, Springer, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter investigates interreligious discussion groups where participants in interreligious projects or activities can meet to talk face-to-face, i.e. listen to each other and address issues that directly or indirectly concern religious pluralism, religion and different life stances. Discussions are not just about talking but are strongly related to relations and networking by relying on rules and norms for the conversations. Another finding was a general observation in our data that religious differences are used as a means for learning about other religions, as compared with community and side-by-side activities which instead were characterised by the emphasis on the commonalities. When differences were highlighted in discussion groups the asymmetry in knowledge between those belonging to a religion and those not belonging to that religion was established. We also found that truth claims were regularly downplayed and that religion instead was presented through personal stories. Another feature was the sharing of common experiences such as being a religious minority in a secularised society.  

Keywords: face-to-face; rules and norms; asymmetries of knowledge; truth claims; stories; common experiences  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29309 (URN)978-3-030-16796-7 (ISBN)
Note

Forthcoming

Available from: 2019-02-18 Created: 2019-02-18 Last updated: 2019-10-22Bibliographically approved
Liljestrand, J. (2019). Religious Thinking Case Study 5: Community Consultation. In: Ipgrave, Julia (Ed.), Interreligious Engagement in Urban Spaces: Social, material and ideological dimensions. Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Religious Thinking Case Study 5: Community Consultation
2019 (English)In: Interreligious Engagement in Urban Spaces: Social, material and ideological dimensions / [ed] Ipgrave, Julia, Springer, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter analyses interreligious community consultations, an activity in which people of different religious or non-religious identities are brought together to consult with each other on community issues or negotiate specific community projects. Religious thinking in the context of community consultations is often related to secular actors although the internal motivations may be religious. The former is due the fact that interreligious groups are situated in western secular society and as a consequence of this rely on a secular discourse. It is clear that a secular language impacts on theology and the possibilities for adopting religious thinking. However, this is not the case for all consultations. Our results point to the hybridity rather than the homogeneity of talking and thinking in public. The necessity of community consultation is thus clearly related to the mundane situatedness of interreligious dialogue rather than to a transcendent reality. In such an environment, theology implies different ways of relating religious motives to the mundane situatedness of interreligious work.                     

Keywords: community projects; secular discourse; internal motivation; hybridity; secular language; mundane situatedness  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29310 (URN)978-3-030-16796-7 (ISBN)
Note

Forthcoming

Available from: 2019-02-18 Created: 2019-02-18 Last updated: 2019-10-22Bibliographically approved
Liljestrand, J. (2019). Spatial Dimension: Concluding Chapter Imagined Meaning, Embodied Meaning, Contested Meaning. In: Ipgrave, Julia (Ed.), Interreligious Engagement in Urban Spaces: Social, material and ideological dimensions. Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spatial Dimension: Concluding Chapter Imagined Meaning, Embodied Meaning, Contested Meaning
2019 (English)In: Interreligious Engagement in Urban Spaces: Social, material and ideological dimensions / [ed] Ipgrave, Julia, Springer, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This conclusion summarises and develops seven cases studies aiming to shed light on the spatial condition for urban interreligious projects. The characteristic of cooperation may (partly) be contrasted to religious pluralism characterised by competition, conflict and violence. As physical spaces for meeting, rooted in the histories of areas and of communities, the places in question are the sites where visions and perceptions meet material and social realities. We attempt to show that the aim of cooperation is intertwined in relationships originated in both perceptions and visions of places and through interactions in the embodiments related to physical constructions. Linked to vision and embodiment are the negotiations and contestations that are often found to be present when examples of cooperation are analysed regarding how place is enacted and interpreted by the groups and individuals involved. The interreligious activities highlighted in these cases illuminate dilemmatic situations when actors representing and belonging to different religious communities encounter each other with the main purpose to cooperate. 

Keywords: visions; perceptions; physical construction; embodiment; negotiations; dilemmatic 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29308 (URN)978-3-030-16796-7_16 (DOI)
Note

Forthcoming

Available from: 2019-02-18 Created: 2019-02-18 Last updated: 2019-09-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4439-6169

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