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Knez, Igor
Publications (10 of 65) Show all publications
Andersson-Sköld, Y., Klingberg, J., Gunnarsson, B., Cullinane, K., Gustafsson, I., Hedblom, M., . . . Thorsson, S. (2018). A framework for assessing urban greenery's effects and valuing its ecosystem services. Journal of Environmental Management, 205, 274-285, Article ID S0301-4797(17)30940-4.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A framework for assessing urban greenery's effects and valuing its ecosystem services
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 205, p. 274-285, article id S0301-4797(17)30940-4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ongoing urban exploitation is increasing pressure to transform urban green spaces, while there is increasing awareness that greenery provides a range of important benefits to city residents. In efforts to help resolve associated problems we have developed a framework for integrated assessments of ecosystem service (ES) benefits and values provided by urban greenery, based on the ecosystem service cascade model. The aim is to provide a method for assessing the contribution to, and valuing, multiple ES provided by urban greenery that can be readily applied in routine planning processes. The framework is unique as it recognizes that an urban greenery comprises several components and functions that can contribute to multiple ecosystem services in one or more ways via different functional traits (e.g. foliage characteristics) for which readily measured indicators have been identified. The framework consists of five steps including compilation of an inventory of indicator; application of effectivity factors to rate indicators' effectiveness; estimation of effects; estimation of benefits for each ES; estimation of the total ES value of the ecosystem. The framework was applied to assess ecosystem services provided by trees, shrubs, herbs, birds, and bees, in green areas spanning an urban gradient in Gothenburg, Sweden. Estimates of perceived values of ecosystem services were obtained from interviews with the public and workshop activities with civil servants. The framework is systematic and transparent at all stages and appears to have potential utility in the existing spatial planning processes.

Keywords
Benefits, Case study application, Ecosystem service effects, Ecosystem service valuation, Framework, Urban greenery
National Category
Other Natural Sciences Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25410 (URN)10.1016/j.jenvman.2017.09.071 (DOI)000415781600027 ()29020655 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85030699219 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2012-3411-22602-60Swedish Transport Administration, 2010/11730Mistra Urban Futures
Available from: 2017-10-16 Created: 2017-10-16 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved
Knez, I., Butler, A., Ode Sang, Å., Ångman, E., Sarlöv-Herlin, I. & Åkerskog, A. (2018). Before and after a natural disaster: disruption in emotion component of place-identity and wellbeing. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 55, 11-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Before and after a natural disaster: disruption in emotion component of place-identity and wellbeing
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 55, p. 11-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim was to investigate relationships between emotion and cognition components of place-identity and wellbeing, before and after a natural disaster. A total of 656 respondents, living near the area of the largest forest and landscape fire in modern times in Sweden, participated in this study. Before the disaster, a positive association was found between place-identity and wellbeing, indicating that the stronger emotions participants evolved to the place, as well as remembered more and thought about the place, the stronger wellbeing they experienced at the site. After the disaster, the strength of this relationship decreased more than twice, accounted for by the weakening of the emotion-wellbeing link. Accordingly, participants almost lost their emotional bond to the area but maintained their memories and thoughts about the site intact and, by that, their positive wellbeing associations with the location. This indicates tentatively the phenomenon of post-traumatic growth, type of resilience involving operations of cognitive appraisal. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press, 2018
Keywords
Cognition, Emotion, Natural disaster, Place-identity, Posttraumatic growth, Wellbeing
National Category
Applied Psychology Agricultural Science, Forestry and Fisheries
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25784 (URN)10.1016/j.jenvp.2017.11.002 (DOI)000428489200002 ()2-s2.0-85035769339 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2017-12-12 Created: 2017-12-12 Last updated: 2018-04-16Bibliographically approved
Fredholm, S., Eliasson, I. & Knez, I. (2018). Conservation of historical landscapes: What signifies ‘successful’ management?. Landscape research, 43(5), 735-748
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conservation of historical landscapes: What signifies ‘successful’ management?
2018 (English)In: Landscape research, ISSN 0142-6397, E-ISSN 1469-9710, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 735-748Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper focuses on the management of an industrial heritage site in Sweden, which local stakeholders and heritage planners have claimed to be successful. This status of excellence is investigated in relation to the general, county-wide applied heritage planning. The results show that key factors for successful management of the industrial heritage site are not related only to conservation work, but also to personal engagement, sense of responsibility, and well-being among participants. However, heritage planners generally lack methods to address immaterial values and socio-economic benefits of engaging in heritage activities, resulting in a separation between physical and communal aspects of heritage planning. The results highlight the issue of professional legitimacy and the challenges for heritage planners to address regional policy objectives, such as finding ways to utilise historic landscapes in destination-driven strategies and to simultaneously support civil engagement in heritage-related issues. © 2017 Landscape Research Group Ltd

Keywords
bottom-up engagement, Heritage conservation, historical landscapes
National Category
Other Social Sciences Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-24869 (URN)10.1080/01426397.2017.1335864 (DOI)000432212800012 ()2-s2.0-85023740546 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish National Heritage BoardSwedish Environmental Protection Agency, 3.2.2-3404-2012
Note

Funding agencies:

- County administrative board of Jamtland- University of Gothenburg- University of Gävle

Available from: 2017-08-17 Created: 2017-08-17 Last updated: 2018-06-05Bibliographically approved
Butler, A., Sarlöv-Herlin, I., Knez, I., Ångman, E., Ode Sang, Å. & Åkerskog, A. (2018). Landscape identity, before and after a forest fire. Landscape research, 43(6), 878-889
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Landscape identity, before and after a forest fire
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2018 (English)In: Landscape research, ISSN 0142-6397, E-ISSN 1469-9710, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 878-889Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Our identity is tied to where we are and how we engage with the landscapes in which we find ourselves. But what happens if the landscape which we use for our everyday life is drastically altered by a catastrophic upheaval, for example, when forest fires ravage the landscape? In this paper, interviews with individuals affected by the largest forest fire in modern Swedish history are used to exemplify our conceptualisation of how landscape identity is impacted by dramatic change. We address the phases of stability, change and progression in relation to the case. Finally, we propose that landscape identity can be utilised as a central concept for engaging with the social aspects of the impact of forest fires.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
forest fire, Landscape identity, post disaster recovery, Sweden
National Category
Forest Science Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-24870 (URN)10.1080/01426397.2017.1344205 (DOI)000435333600009 ()2-s2.0-85023743290 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-17 Created: 2017-08-17 Last updated: 2018-07-05Bibliographically approved
Nordhall, O. & Knez, I. (2018). Motivation and Justice at Work: The Role of Emotion and Cognition Components of Personal and Collective Work Identity. Frontiers in Psychology, 8, Article ID 2307.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Motivation and Justice at Work: The Role of Emotion and Cognition Components of Personal and Collective Work Identity
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 8, article id 2307Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate the role of personal and collective work identity (including emotion and cognition components), in predicting work motivation (operationalized as work self-determined motivation) and organizational justice (operationalized as organizational pay justice). Digitized questionnaires were distributed bye-mail to 2905 members, teachers, of a Swedish trade union. A total of 768 individuals answered the questionnaire and by that participated in this study. Personal-compared to collective work identity was shown to positively associate with self-determined motivation accounted for by the emotion component of personal work identity. Collective compared to personal work identity was reported to positively associate with organizational pay justice accounted for by the cognition component of collective work identity. All this suggests that both work-related motivation and organizational justice might be, to some extent, accounted for by the psychological mechanisms of work identity and that, as predicted, different types of work identity, play different significant roles in predicting motivation and justice at work. More precisely, the emotion component of work identity was more pronounced in personal work-bonding relationships, and the cognitive component, of work identity in contrast, was more pronounced in collective work-bonding relationships.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
work identity, personal identity, collective identity, work motivation, organizational justice
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26086 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2017.02307 (DOI)000419923000001 ()29379454 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85040868435 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-31 Created: 2018-01-31 Last updated: 2018-10-15Bibliographically approved
Nordhall, O., Knez, I. & Saboonchi, F. (2018). Predicting general mental health and exhaustion: the role of emotion and cognition components of personal and collective work-identity.. Heliyon, 4(8), Article ID e00735.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predicting general mental health and exhaustion: the role of emotion and cognition components of personal and collective work-identity.
2018 (English)In: Heliyon, ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 4, no 8, article id e00735Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between emotion and cognition components of personal and collective work-identity and self-reported general mental health and exhaustion, in Swedish teachers (N = 768). In line with our predictions, we showed that the emotion component of personal work-identity and the cognition component of collective work-identity associated positively with general mental health and negatively with exhaustion. The reverse result was found, however, for the cognition component of personal work-identity and emotion component of collective work-identity. In general, all this indicates that person-work bonding might, to some degree, account for general mental health and exhaustion in employees. In particular, the findings suggest that general mental health and exhaustion may vary symmetrically across the: (1) Type of person-work bonding (personal vs. collective work-identity); and (2) Type of psychological component (emotion vs. cognition) involved in personal- and collective work-identity.

Keywords
Psychology
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27870 (URN)10.1016/j.heliyon.2018.e00735 (DOI)000443512800040 ()30140768 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85051641370 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-12-04Bibliographically approved
Nordhall, O., Knez, I. & Saboonchi, F. (2018). Teachers´personal work-identity predicts emotional exhaustion and work motivation: amediating role of job demands and resources. In: FALF KONFERENS 2018: Arbetet – problem eller potential för en hållbar livsmiljö?. Paper presented at FALF KONFERENS 2018, 10-12 juni 2018, Gävle. Gävle: Gävle University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teachers´personal work-identity predicts emotional exhaustion and work motivation: amediating role of job demands and resources
2018 (English)In: FALF KONFERENS 2018: Arbetet – problem eller potential för en hållbar livsmiljö?, Gävle: Gävle University Press , 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background

Teachers´ psychological job demands (large class sizes, low social support, and expectations to care for pupils, parents and colleagues) are positively related to their emotional exhaustion. Teachers´ psychological job resources (autonomy, mastery of skills, and experiences of their work as incentive and interesting) are positively related to work motivation and engagement, which can be defined as the positive antipode of emotional exhaustion. In addition, job demands and resources may, in general terms, explain the relationships between the employee and different work motivation- and mental illness outcomes.

Furthermore, teachers´ personal work-identity comprises cognitive- (coherence, correspondence, mental time, reflection, agency) and emotional- (attachment, belongingness, closeness) components, differently associated with various work-related outcomes. Our previous results show that the cognitive component positively relates to emotional exhaustion, and the emotional one positively relates to self-determined work motivation. These relationships have up to date not been theoretically and practically related to organizational/job characteristic factors, such as, job demands and resources.

 

Aims

Firstly, we investigated if a positive relationship between teachers´ cognitive personal work-identity and emotional exhaustion was mediated by psychological job demands. Secondly, we checked for if a positive relationship between teachers´ emotional personal work-identity and self-determined work motivation was mediated by psychological job resources.

Methods

768 members, representing eleven different local teachers´ trade unions, working in the south and middle part of Sweden replied to a digitized questionnaire measuring cognitive- and emotional components of personal work identity, job demands (prosocial extra-role performances) and resources (educational inspirations), emotional exhaustion and self-determined work motivation. Two mediation analyzes were performed by PROCESS macro for SPSS (version 2.16.3), model 4.

 

Results

A positive relationship between teachers´ cognitive personal work- identity and emotional exhaustion was mediated by psychological job demands: completely standardized indirect effects: β= .04, 95% CI [.0180, .0650].

Also, a positive relationship between teachers´ emotional personal work- identity and self-determined work motivation was positively mediated by psychological job resources: completely standardized indirect effect: β= .09, 95% CI [.0569, .1178].

This suggests that, when teachers think (cognitive component of work-identity) more of their work, they will be more emotionally exhausted, but when they feel (emotional component of work-identity) more of their work they will be more motivated to work. Psychological job demands and resources may however and to some extent explain these relationships, respectively.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Gävle: Gävle University Press, 2018
National Category
Work Sciences Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27331 (URN)978-91-88145-28-4 (ISBN)
Conference
FALF KONFERENS 2018, 10-12 juni 2018, Gävle
Available from: 2018-06-25 Created: 2018-06-25 Last updated: 2018-06-25Bibliographically approved
Knez, I., Sang, A. O., Gunnarsson, B. & Hedblom, M. (2018). Wellbeing in urban greenery: The role of naturalness and place identity. Frontiers in Psychology, 9, Article ID 491.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wellbeing in urban greenery: The role of naturalness and place identity
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 9, article id 491Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim was to investigate effects of urban greenery (high vs. low naturalness) on place identity and wellbeing, and the links between place identity and wellbeing. It was shown that participants (Gothenburg, Sweden, N = 1347) estimated a stronger attachment/closeness/belonging (emotional component of place-identity), and more remembrance and thinking about and mental travel (cognitive component of place-identity) in relation to high vs. low perceived naturalness. High naturalness was also reported to generate higher wellbeing in participants than low naturalness. Furthermore, place identity was shown to predict participants' wellbeing in urban greenery, accounting for 35% of variance explained by the regression. However, there was a stronger relationship between the emotional vs. the cognitive component of place identity and wellbeing. Finally, a significant role of place identity in mediating the naturalness-wellbeing relationship was shown, indicating that the naturalness-wellbeing connection can be partly accounted for by the psychological mechanisms of people-place bonding.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
Affect-regulation, Naturalness, Place identity, Urban greenery, Wellbeing
National Category
Applied Psychology Other Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26733 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00491 (DOI)000429709700001 ()29695984 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85045254661 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-04 Created: 2018-06-04 Last updated: 2018-06-04Bibliographically approved
Hedblom, M., Knez, I. & Gunnarsson, B. (2017). Bird diversity improves the well-being of city residents. In: Enrique Murgui, Marcus Hedblom (Ed.), Ecology and Conservation of Birds in Urban Environments: (pp. 287-306). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bird diversity improves the well-being of city residents
2017 (English)In: Ecology and Conservation of Birds in Urban Environments / [ed] Enrique Murgui, Marcus Hedblom, Springer, 2017, p. 287-306Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Humans are increasingly becoming urbanized. Because a number of bird species readily live in urban areas and birds are relatively easily observed, birds are becoming the largest everyday encounter with wild fauna people will have, globally. Despite, few studies have been made on how visual (or acoustic) bird encounter affects humans. The few existing studies show that birds provide humans with increased self-evaluated well-being when seeing and hearing them. These values provided by birds can be recognized as a cultural ecosystems service. Here we review extant literature to consider why certain species fascinate humans more than others, and some can increase well-being and provide ecosystem services, while others offer disservices through unappealing characteristics. We particularly highlight indications of links between species diversity and well-being. Finally, we discuss possible reasons for variations in our responses to birds and birdsong associated with age, gender, childhood, contact with nature, and the biophilia theory. If interaction with birds truly increases quality of life, then this value should be considered in the planning of sustainable cities. Both conservation and proper management of existing urban green areas are needed to increase possibilities to encounter many bird species. © Springer International Publishing AG 2017.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keywords
Biodiversity, Green space, Passerines, Songbirds, Urban soundscape, Urban woodland
National Category
Other Agricultural Sciences Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-24631 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-43314-1_15 (DOI)2-s2.0-85019931651 (Scopus ID)9783319433141 (ISBN)9783319433127 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-06-30 Created: 2017-06-30 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Gunnarsson, B., Knez, I., Hedblom, M. & Sang, Å. (2017). Effects of biodiversity and environment-related attitude on perception of urban green space. Urban Ecosystems, 20(1), 37-49
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of biodiversity and environment-related attitude on perception of urban green space
2017 (English)In: Urban Ecosystems, ISSN 1083-8155, E-ISSN 1573-1642, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 37-49Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Green space in cities contributes to the quality of life for city dwellers, e.g., by increasing the opportunity for recreation. However, perception of urban green space is influenced by multiple factors. We investigated effects of biodiversity and environment-related attitudes on visual and auditory perceptions of urban green space. Field measurements of biodiversity were conducted in six sites across an urban gradient in Gothenburg, Sweden, and three categories of biodiversity—high, medium, low—were established. Households were sent a survey on aesthetic perception of urban green space, sound perception and the importance of trees and plants for the perception of bird species. Each respondent focused on the site that was located nearby. The environment-related attitudes comprised “Nature-oriented” and “Urban-oriented” persons and were based on participants’ own attitude estimations. It was shown that participants’ “subjective” aesthetic and sound-related perception of urban greenery were in line with the “objectively” measured subdivisions of high, medium and low biodiversity. So also were their estimations of the importance of trees and plants for perception of bird species in urban greenery, although differing only between high and medium/low biodiversity conditions. Persons rating themselves as highly nature-oriented were shown to give higher scores to urban green space aesthetics and to value greenery-related sounds higher, and to attach greater importance to trees and plants in their perception of bird species in urban greenery, than less nature-oriented persons. Highly urban-oriented persons compared to less urban-oriented persons did the same, but only regarding urban greenery-related aesthetics and sounds of nature. We conclude that environment-related attitudes influence perceptions of green space. Moreover, our findings support the idea that biodiversity per se also influences perceptions; people value green space significantly more with high than with low measured biodiversity. Urban planning needs to provide city inhabitants with green spaces that are species-rich, lush, varied and rich with natural sounds.

Keywords
Aesthetic perception, Bird song, Soundscape, Species richness, Urban vegetation
National Category
Other Natural Sciences Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-22238 (URN)10.1007/s11252-016-0581-x (DOI)000397021300003 ()2-s2.0-84978826706 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasMistra Urban FuturesSwedish Transport Administration
Available from: 2016-08-17 Created: 2016-08-17 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
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