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Huysmans, M. A., Srinivasan, D. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2019). Consistency of sedentary behavior patterns among office workers with long-term access to sit-stand workstations. Annals of Work Exposures and Health, 63(5), 583-591
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consistency of sedentary behavior patterns among office workers with long-term access to sit-stand workstations
2019 (English)In: Annals of Work Exposures and Health, ISSN 2398-7308, Vol. 63, no 5, p. 583-591Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Sit-stand workstations are a popular intervention to reduce sedentary behavior (SB) in office settings. However, the extent and distribution of SB in office workers long-term accustomed to using sit-stand workstations as a natural part of their work environment are largely unknown. In the present study, we aimed to describe patterns of SB in office workers with long-term access to sit-stand workstations and to determine the extent to which these patterns vary between days and workers. METHODS: SB was objectively monitored using thigh-worn accelerometers for a full week in 24 office workers who had been equipped with a sit-stand workstation for at least 10 months. A comprehensive set of variables describing SB was calculated for each workday and worker, and distributions of these variables between days and workers were examined. RESULTS: On average, workers spent 68% work time sitting [standard deviation (SD) between workers and between days (within worker): 10.4 and 18.2%]; workers changed from sitting to standing/walking 3.2 times per hour (SDs 0.6 and 1.2 h-1); with bouts of sitting being 14.9 min long (SDs 4.2 and 8.5 min). About one-third of the workers spent >75% of their workday sitting. Between-workers variability was significantly different from zero only for percent work time sitting, while between-days (within-worker) variability was substantial for all SB variables. CONCLUSIONS: Office workers accustomed to using sit-stand workstations showed homogeneous patterns of SB when averaged across several days, except for percent work time seated. However, SB differed substantially between days for any individual worker. The finding that many workers were extensively sedentary suggests that just access to sit-stand workstations may not be a sufficient remedy against SB; additional personalized interventions reinforcing use may be needed. To this end, differences in SB between days should be acknowledged as a potentially valuable source of variation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
Temporal patterns, sitting time, day-to-day variability, individual differences, computer work, variance component analysis
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27606 (URN)10.1093/annweh/wxz022 (DOI)31008506 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85066456948 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Note

Also funding from the employers of the authors; the University of Gävle, Amsterdam UMC, and Virginia Tech USA

Available from: 2018-07-29 Created: 2018-07-29 Last updated: 2019-08-16Bibliographically approved
Jackson, J., Srinivasan, D. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2019). Consistent individual motor variability traits demonstrated by females performing a long-cycle assembly task under conditions differing in temporal organisation. Applied Ergonomics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consistent individual motor variability traits demonstrated by females performing a long-cycle assembly task under conditions differing in temporal organisation
2019 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

Low motor variability (MV) during repetitive work has shown association with higher risk for developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). Whether consistent individual MV characteristics exist across working conditions remains unknown. This study aimed to determine if individual MV traits were consistent during complex assembly work performed under conditions differing in temporal organisation.

Fifteen women performed cyclic-assembly under four conditions differing in pace and organisation (line-type, batch-type). Variability of trapezius muscle activity and upper arm elevation was quantified. Total MV variance was partitioned into components attributable to subjects, days and conditions.

For all metrics, a non-zero between-subjects variance was found, indicating consistent individual MV traits across conditions. Variance between subjects was higher for EMG MV metrics compared with kinematic metrics.

Our results showed individuals exhibited consistent MV traits across working conditions differing in pace and production process, and support continued research into MV as a possible individual risk factor for MSDs.

Keywords
motor control, trapezius electromyography, upper arm elevation angle
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30605 (URN)
Available from: 2019-08-28 Created: 2019-08-28 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Kelson, D. M., Mathiassen, S. E. & Srinivasan, D. (2019). Trapezius muscle activity variation during computer work performed by individuals with and without shoulder-neck pain. Applied Ergonomics, 81, Article ID 102908.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trapezius muscle activity variation during computer work performed by individuals with and without shoulder-neck pain
2019 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 81, article id 102908Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aimed at determining the extent to which individuals with neck-shoulder pain and non-symptomatic individuals differ in muscle activation patterns, when performing computer work, as quantified by exposure variation analysis (EVA). As a secondary aim, we also aimed to quantify the day-to-day reliability of EVA variables describing trapezius muscle activation in a non-symptomatic control group. Thirteen touch-typing computer users (pain: n=5, non-symptomatic: n=8) completed three pre-selected computer tasks in the laboratory.

Upper trapezius muscle activity was recorded using electromyography and analyzed using EVA with five amplitude and five duration categories. Individuals with neck-shoulder pain spent less time at low amplitudes and exhibited longer uninterrupted periods of muscle activation compared to their non-symptomatic counterparts. Thus, non-symptomatic workers tended to switch between exposure levels more often than individuals with pain. For a majority of EVA variables, ICCs ranged from 0.6 to 0.9, and between-days coefficients of variation were between 0.4 and 2.2.

Keywords
Exposure variation analysis, motor variability, reliability
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-28821 (URN)10.1016/j.apergo.2019.102908 (DOI)31422258 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85069671222 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-14 Created: 2018-12-14 Last updated: 2019-10-11Bibliographically approved
Barbieri, D., Srinivasan, D., Mathiassen, S. E. & Oliveira, A. B. (2019). Variation in upper extremity, neck and trunk postures when performing computer work at a sit-stand station. Applied Ergonomics, 75, 120-128
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Variation in upper extremity, neck and trunk postures when performing computer work at a sit-stand station
2019 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 75, p. 120-128Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to determine the extent of upper arm, neck and trunk posture variation that can be obtained by combining seated and standing computer work, compared to performing only seated computer work. Posture data were recorded for two hours during each of three days of ordinary work from 24 office workers that had been using a sit-stand station for two months. Periods with sitting and standing computer work were identified using on-site observations, and posture means and minute-to-minute variance were determined for both. Expected minute-to-minute posture variability in different temporal combinations of sitting and standing computer work were determined by simulation, and expressed in terms of a Job Variance Ratio, i.e. the relative increase in variability compared to sitting-only work. For all three postures, mean values differed between sitting and standing computer work, and both showed a notable minute-to-minute variability. For most workers, posture variability was larger when combining sitting and standing than when sitting only, and simulations suggested to introduce more standing than what the worker currently practiced. The results indicate that introducing a sit-stand table could, for most office workers, have a positive effect on upper arm, neck and trunk posture variability.

Keywords
office work; adjustable table; job variance ratio (JVR); sedentary behaviors, trunk flexion, upper arm elevation
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23157 (URN)10.1016/j.apergo.2018.09.012 (DOI)000454371900010 ()30509516 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-8505417244 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Note

Funders:

Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq) Grant n:o 472946/2013-7

Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP) Grant n:o 2015/19504-4

Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP) Grant n:o 2012/24502-2

National Council for Scientific Research

Available from: 2016-12-24 Created: 2016-12-24 Last updated: 2019-06-24Bibliographically approved
Kelson, D., Srinivasan, D. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2018). Differences in trapezius muscle activation patterns in office workers with and without chronic neck-shoulder pain, as quantified through exposure variation analysis. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting: . Paper presented at Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 2018 Annual Meeting, 1-5 October 2018, Philadelphia, USA (pp. 962-966). Sage Publications, 2
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences in trapezius muscle activation patterns in office workers with and without chronic neck-shoulder pain, as quantified through exposure variation analysis
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, Sage Publications, 2018, Vol. 2, p. 962-966Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study was to quantify upper-trapezius muscle activation patterns using exposure variation analysis (EVA) in healthy computer workers and those with chronic neck-shoulder pain. Eight healthy and five chronic pain participants were asked to complete three computer-based tasks (TYPE, CLICK, and FORM) in two pacing conditions (self-paced and control-paced). EVA was used to quantify variation using five amplitude classes and five duration classes. Performance in each task was also quantified. Healthy workers and those with chronic pain did not differ in performance, and they both exhibited similarly low levels of muscle activation amplitude. Pain participants, however, were found to spend less time in lower duration classes across tasks and conditions. These results indicate that individuals with chronic neck-shoulder pain utilize movement strategies involving sustained durations of continuous muscle activation. This may be suggestive of decreased temporal variation in muscle activation patterns in those with chronic pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-28296 (URN)10.1177/1541931218621222 (DOI)2-s2.0-85072756414 (Scopus ID)
Conference
Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 2018 Annual Meeting, 1-5 October 2018, Philadelphia, USA
Available from: 2018-10-12 Created: 2018-10-12 Last updated: 2019-10-15Bibliographically approved
Jackson, J., Srinivasan, D. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2018). Is movement variability a consistent personal trait? Kinematic evidence from long-cycle assembly work. In: : . Paper presented at 20th Congress International Ergonomics Association, 26-30 augusti, 2018, Florens, Italy.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is movement variability a consistent personal trait? Kinematic evidence from long-cycle assembly work
2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27826 (URN)
Conference
20th Congress International Ergonomics Association, 26-30 augusti, 2018, Florens, Italy
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Available from: 2018-09-04 Created: 2018-09-04 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
Weber, Z. R., Srinivasan, D. & Côté, J. (2018). Sex-Specific Links in Motor and Sensory Adaptations to Repetitive Motion-Induced Fatigue. Motor Control, 22(2), 149-169
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sex-Specific Links in Motor and Sensory Adaptations to Repetitive Motion-Induced Fatigue
2018 (English)In: Motor Control, ISSN 1087-1640, E-ISSN 1543-2696, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 149-169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objectives of this study were to assess the sex-specific relationships between motor and sensory adaptations to repetitive arm motion-induced neck/shoulder fatigue, and measure how additional sensory stimulation affected these adaptations. Twenty-three participants performed two sessions of a repetitive pointing task until scoring 8 on the Borg CR10 scale for neck/shoulder exertion or for a maximum of 45min, with and without sensory stimulation (i.e. light touch) applied on the fatiguing shoulder. Just before reaching the task termination criteria, all participants showed changes in mean and variability of arm joint angles and experienced a five-fold increase in anterior deltoid (AD) sensory threshold in the stimulus-present condition. Women with the greatest increases in AD sensory thresholds demonstrated the greatest increases in shoulder variability (r= .66) whereas men with the greatest increases in upper trapezius sensory thresholds demonstrated greatest changes in shoulder angle (r= -.60) and coordination (r= .65) variability. Thus, sensory stimulation had no influence on time-to-termination but affected how men and women differently adapted, suggesting sex differences in the sensorimotor fatigue response mechanisms.

Keywords
Biomechanics, Gender, Motor control, Muscle fatigue
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-24200 (URN)10.1123/mc.2017-0004 (DOI)000429381400003 ()28530500 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047006473 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2011-0075
Note

Funding agencies:

- Institut de Recherche Robert-Sauve en Sante et en Securite du Travail (IRSST)- Natural Science and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) 

Available from: 2017-06-13 Created: 2017-06-13 Last updated: 2018-06-05Bibliographically approved
Kelson, D., Srinivasan, D. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2018). Trapezius Muscle Activity Variation during computer work performed by individuals with andwithout chronic neck shoulder pain. In: : . Paper presented at 20th Congress International Ergonomics Association, 26-30 augusti, 2018, Florens, Italy.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trapezius Muscle Activity Variation during computer work performed by individuals with andwithout chronic neck shoulder pain
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27829 (URN)
Conference
20th Congress International Ergonomics Association, 26-30 augusti, 2018, Florens, Italy
Available from: 2018-09-04 Created: 2018-09-04 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
Srinivasan, D., Mathiassen, S. E. & Huysmans, M. (2017). Between-subjects and between-days variance in occupational sitting time among seasoned users of sit-stand workstations. In: : . Paper presented at American Industrial Hygiene Conference & Exposition 2017, June 4-7​ 2017, Seattle, WA, USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Between-subjects and between-days variance in occupational sitting time among seasoned users of sit-stand workstations
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-24195 (URN)
Conference
American Industrial Hygiene Conference & Exposition 2017, June 4-7​ 2017, Seattle, WA, USA
Available from: 2017-06-13 Created: 2017-06-13 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Barbieri, D. F., Srinivasan, D., Mathiassen, S. E. & Oliveira, A. B. (2017). Comparison of sedentary behaviors in office workers using sit-stand tables with and without semi-automated position changes. Human Factors, 59(5), 782-795
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of sedentary behaviors in office workers using sit-stand tables with and without semi-automated position changes
2017 (English)In: Human Factors, ISSN 0018-7208, E-ISSN 1547-8181, Vol. 59, no 5, p. 782-795Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: This study compared usage patterns of two different electronically controlled sit-stand tables during a 2-month intervention period among office workers.

Background: Office workers spend most of their working time sitting, which is likely detrimental to health. Although the introduction of sit-stand tables has been suggested as an effective intervention to decrease sitting time, limited evidence is available on usage patterns of sit-stand tables, and whether patterns   are influenced by table configuration.

Methods: Twelve workers were provided with standard sit-stand tables (non-automated table group) and 12 with semi-automated sit-stand tables programmed to change table position according to a pre-set pattern, if the user agreed to the system-generated prompt (semi-automated table group). Table position was monitored continuously for two months after introducing the tables, as a proxy for sit-stand behavior.

Results: On average, the table was in a “sit” position for 85% of the work-day in both groups; this did not change significantly during the 2-month period. Switches in table position from sit to stand were, however, more frequent in the semi-automated table group than in the non-automated table group (0.65 vs. 0.29 hr-1; p=0.001).

Conclusion: Introducing a semi-automated sit-stand table appeared to be an attractive alternative to a standard sit-stand table, since it led to more posture variation.

Application: A semi-automated sit-stand table may effectively contribute to making postures more variable among office workers, and thus aid in alleviating negative health effects of extensive sitting.

Keywords
Alternative workstation; posture variation; fatigue; productivity
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-21528 (URN)10.1177/0018720817695771 (DOI)000405498500005 ()28704634 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85024105349 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Note

Funding agency:

Sao Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP)  Grant no: 2015/19504-4; 2012/24502-2 

National Council of Technological and Scientific Development (CNPq)  Grant no: 472946/2013-7

Available from: 2016-05-30 Created: 2016-05-30 Last updated: 2018-06-04Bibliographically approved
Projects
FIIP: Motor Variability in Occupational Work: Determinants & Physiological effects [2011-00075_Forte]; University of Gävle
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9327-6177

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