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Mathiassen, Svend ErikORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1443-6211
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Januario, L., Mathiassen, S. E., Bergström, G. & Jackson, J. (2024). Did the COVID-19 pandemic influence inequality in self-reported work environment conditions based on gender and place of birth? A study of a Swedish commercial laundromat. Applied Ergonomics, 114, Article ID 104113.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Did the COVID-19 pandemic influence inequality in self-reported work environment conditions based on gender and place of birth? A study of a Swedish commercial laundromat
2024 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 114, article id 104113Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We evaluated differences in work environment conditions and health by gender and place of birth in a commercial laundromat prior to (baseline) and at the end of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic (follow-up). Using survey data, including dimensions from the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, from forty-one workers, we assessed work environment conditions and health at baseline, follow-up and in change scores between baseline and follow-up. At baseline, men and women reported similar scores, while foreign-born (FB) workers reported better work environment conditions than Swedish-born (SB) workers. During the pandemic, conditions generally declined for all workers, but FB reported smaller declines than SB. A consistent inequality hierarchy across the 4 groups was not clear at baseline, follow-up or in change scores between time points. The study suggests potential cultural differences may exist in how work environment conditions are experienced. This should be considered in future studies and when managing future crises

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
hospital laundry service; SARS-CoV-2; psychosocial factors
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work, Inkluderande arbetsliv; Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-41113 (URN)10.1016/j.apergo.2023.104113 (DOI)001060029800001 ()37611535 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85168417633 (Scopus ID)
Funder
AFA Insurance, 200243
Available from: 2023-02-22 Created: 2023-02-22 Last updated: 2024-01-31Bibliographically approved
Greby Schmidt, K., Lerche, A. F., Raunkjær Christensen, M., Lund Rasmussen, C., Straker, L., Mathiassen, S. E. & Holtermann, A. (2024). Effectiveness of a Goldilocks Work intervention in childcare workers – A cluster-randomized controlled trial. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effectiveness of a Goldilocks Work intervention in childcare workers – A cluster-randomized controlled trial
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2024 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990XArticle in journal (Refereed) Accepted
Abstract [en]

ObjectivePoor cardiorespiratory fitness and health is common among childcare workers. We designed “Goldilocks-games” according to the Goldilocks Work principle to provide high-intensity physical activity for childcare workers. We investigated the effectiveness of this Goldilocks Work intervention in increasing occupational high-intensity physical activity and improving work-related health.

MethodsIn a two-arm cluster randomized trial, 16 childcare institutions with 142 workers were randomly allocated to either an 8-week Goldilocks Work intervention or a control group. The primary outcome was occupational time in high-intensity physical activity. Secondary outcomes were occupational time in active physical behaviors, heart rate during sleep, pain, physical exhaustion, energy at work, work productivity, and need for recovery. 

ResultsThe intervention was successfully delivered and received. Both groups had a low amount of occupational high-intensity physical activity at baseline, and the intervention group reported playing the games 3.1 (SD 1.5) times/week for a duration of 112.2 (SD 175.0) min/week. However, the intervention did not increase high-intensity physical activity or the secondary outcomes, except for energy at work, measured on a scale from 0-10, increasing 0.65 (95% CI, 0.08-1.21), and need for recovery, measured on a scale from 1-5, decreasing -0.32 (95% CI, -0.54- -0.09).

ConclusionThe intervention was successfully delivered and received, but did not increase high-intensity physical activity. The intervention group increased their energy at work and decreased their need for recovery, but not the other health-related outcomes. Research on how to design and implement health-promoting work environment interventions in childcare are needed.

Keywords
High-intensity physical activity; RCT; Workplace intervention
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-42970 (URN)
Available from: 2023-09-06 Created: 2023-09-06 Last updated: 2024-02-19Bibliographically approved
Lerche, A. F., Mathiassen, S. E., Lund Rasmmusen, C., Straker, L., Holtermann, A. & Søgaard, K. (2024). Effectiveness of a Goldilocks Work intervention to promote musculoskeletal health among industrial workers – A cluster randomized controlled trial. Journal of Safety Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effectiveness of a Goldilocks Work intervention to promote musculoskeletal health among industrial workers – A cluster randomized controlled trial
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Safety Research, ISSN 0022-4375, E-ISSN 1879-1247Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Industrial workers with physically demanding work have increased risk of musculoskeletal pain. The present 12-week Goldilocks Work intervention aimed to organize work among industrial workers to comprise a ‘just right’ ergonomic balance of physical behaviors (i.e., sit, stand and active) intended to promote musculoskeletal health. The paper investigates the effectiveness of the intervention in reducing low back pain after work.         

Methods: 83 workers across 28 workteams in a biotech organization were recruited. Workteams were randomly allocated to receive the intervention or work as usual (control). Intervention workteams implemented the Goldilocks Work planning tool to organize their work tasks towards a predefined ‘just right’ ergonomic balance (i.e., composition of 60% sitting, 30% standing, 10% active work and hourly task alternation). The primary outcome was low back pain intensity. Secondary outcomes were bodily pain, fatigue, physical exertion, productivity and energy after work measured in the survey, and composition and alternations of physical behaviors measured using wearable sensors.  

Results: The intervention was delivered almost as planned, with good quality and high adherence among most workteams. However, the intervention did not change physical behaviors towards the intended ‘just right’ ergonomic balance. No significant reduction in low back pain (0.07, CI 95%: -0.68; 0.82), bodily pain (0.10, CI 95%: -0.57; 0.76), tiredness (-0.53, CI 95%: -1.24; 0.19), physical exertion (-0.18, CI 95%: -0.83; 0.48), or improvement in energy (0.39, CI 95%: -1.02; 0.23) or productivity (-0.03, CI 95%: -0.77; 0.72) were found. 

Conclusion: This Goldilocks Work intervention did not promote musculoskeletal health among industrial workers, and did not change physical behaviors as intended. Thus, more research is needed into implementation strategies to change physical behaviors during productive work towards an evidence-based ‘just right’ ergonomic balance.

National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-42975 (URN)
Available from: 2023-09-07 Created: 2023-09-07 Last updated: 2024-02-12Bibliographically approved
Jackson, J., Mathiassen, S. E., Rydström, K. & Johansson, K. (2024). Protocol for an observational study of working conditions and musculoskeletal health in Swedish online retail warehousing from the perspective of sex/gender and place of birth. PLOS ONE, 19(2), Article ID e0297569.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Protocol for an observational study of working conditions and musculoskeletal health in Swedish online retail warehousing from the perspective of sex/gender and place of birth
2024 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 19, no 2, article id e0297569Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

European and International sustainable development agendas aim to reduce inequalities in working conditions and work-related health, yet disparate occupational health outcomes are evident between both men and women and domestic- and foreign-born workers. In Sweden, major growth in online retail warehousing has increased occupational opportunities for foreign-born workers. The rapid change has left research lagging on working conditions, i.e., employment conditions, facility design, work organisation, physical and psychosocial work environment conditions, and their effects on worker health. Further, no known studies have considered patterns of inequality related to these factors. The overall aim of this study is to describe working conditions and musculoskeletal health in online retail warehousing, determine the extent to which differences exist related to sex/gender and place of birth (as a proxy for race/ethnicity), and examine factors at the organisational and individual levels to understand why any differences exist.

Three online retail warehouses, each employing 50-150 operations workers performing receiving, order picking, order packing and dispatching tasks will be recruited. Warehouses will, to the extent possible, differ in their extent of digital technology use. Employment conditions, facility design (including digital tool use), work organisation, physical and psychosocial work environment conditions and worker health will be assessed by survey, interview and technical measurements. Analysis of quantitative data stratified by sex and place of birth will consider the extent to which inequalities exist. Focus group interviews with operations employees and in-depth interviews with managers, union and health and safety representatives will be conducted to assess how employee working conditions and musculoskeletal health are related to inequality regimes of sex/gender and/or race/ethnicity in organisational processes and practices in online retail warehousing. The study is pre-registered with the Open Science Framework.

This study will describe working conditions and health in online retail warehouse workers and consider the extent to which patterns of inequality exist based on sex/gender and place of birth.

Keywords
inequality, heart rate variability, posture, physical activity profiles, race, ethnicity, work task, psychosocial, COPSOQ, intersectionality
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work, Inkluderande arbetsliv; Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-41047 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0297569 (DOI)38394162 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-01051
Available from: 2023-02-08 Created: 2023-02-08 Last updated: 2024-02-26Bibliographically approved
Rydström, K., Jackson, J., Johansson, K. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2023). A systematic review of work organization, work environment and employment conditions in warehousing in relation to gender and race/ethnicity. Annals of Work Exposures and Health, 67(4), 430-447
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A systematic review of work organization, work environment and employment conditions in warehousing in relation to gender and race/ethnicity
2023 (English)In: Annals of Work Exposures and Health, ISSN 2398-7308 , E-ISSN 2398-7316 , Vol. 67, no 4, p. 430-447Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives. Studies in the goods supply chain in areas outside of warehousing show evidence of gender and racial/ethnic inequalities in working conditions (i.e., in work organization, work environment and employment conditions). This review aimed to identify, summarize, and discuss research focused on inequality in warehousing and its effects on warehouse working conditions. In the review, racial/ethnic inequality includes inequality related to country of birth and (im)migration status.

Methods. We performed a systematic search in the Scopus and Web of Science databases to identify warehouse studies that addressed working conditions and (in)equality at a workplace level. Screening of records was performed using the Rayyan systematic review tool. Risk of bias was assessed according to established methods and checklists. 

Results. Database searches yielded 4910 articles. After title-abstract-keyword and full-text screenings, 21articles were included. Results showed inequality based on gender and race/ethnicity in both work organization (different tasks were performed by different groups of employees), work environment conditions (physical and psychosocial aspects differed) and employment conditions (disparate employment types and incomes between groups of employees). Health differences, as a possible result of unequal working conditions, were evident between different racial/ethnic groups of employees. A hierarchy that included both gender and race/ethnicity was found, with (im)migrant and racialized women positioned at the bottom.

Conclusions. We found evidence that gender and race/ethnicity influenced work organization, work environment conditions, and employment conditions. Evidence was found for an intersection between gender and race/ethnicity. To improve working conditions, and subsequently occupational health, we encourage researchers to simultaneously consider gender and race/ethnicity factors at work, and to consider both why inequality is present and how it impacts working conditions in future studies of warehousing, particularly in online retailing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford Academic, 2023
Keywords
Distribution center; fulfillment center; occupational health; inequality regimes; working conditions
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work; Intelligent Industry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-38233 (URN)10.1093/annweh/wxac098 (DOI)000919276800001 ()36715660 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85160681304 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-01051
Available from: 2022-03-23 Created: 2022-03-23 Last updated: 2023-06-12Bibliographically approved
Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E., Bjärntoft, S., Jahncke, H., Hartig, T. & Hallman, D. (2023). A Work Time Control Tradeoff in Flexible Work: Competitive Pathways to Need for Recovery. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 20(1), Article ID 691.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Work Time Control Tradeoff in Flexible Work: Competitive Pathways to Need for Recovery
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2023 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 691Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Work time control may offer opportunities, but also implies risks for employee recovery, influenced by increased work-related ICT use and overtime work. However, this risk–opportunity tradeoff remains understudied. This study aimed to test two different models of associations between work time control, work-related ICT use, overtime work, and the need for recovery. These models were constructed based on data on office workers with flexible work arrangements. Cross-sectional data were obtained with questionnaires (n = 2582) from employees in a Swedish multi-site organization. Regression models treated the three determinants of the need for recovery either as independent, or as linked in a causal sequence. The test of independent determinants confirmed that more work time control was associated with less need for recovery, whereas more ICT use and overtime work were associated with a higher need for recovery. In a test of serial mediation, more work time control contributed to a greater need for recovery through more ICT use and then more overtime work. Work time control also had a competitive, indirect effect through a negative association with overtime work. Our results suggest that work time control is beneficial for employee recovery, but may for some be associated with more work-related ICT use after regular working hours, thus increasing recovery needs. Policies that support work time control can promote recovery, but employers must attend to the risk of excessive use of ICT outside of regular working hours.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
occupational health, job autonomy, digitalization, working conditions, working times
National Category
Work Sciences
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work, Flexibelt arbete; Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40639 (URN)10.3390/ijerph20010691 (DOI)000909151200001 ()36613009 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85145979290 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009–1761Swedish Transport Administration, 2015/92392
Available from: 2022-12-30 Created: 2022-12-30 Last updated: 2023-01-26Bibliographically approved
Jackson, J., Sund, M., Barlari Lobos, G., Melin, L. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2023). Assessing the efficacy of a job rotation for improving occupational physical and psychosocial work environment, musculoskeletal health, social equality, production quality, and resilience at a commercial laundromat: Protocol for a longitudinal case study. BMJ Open, 13(5), Article ID e067633.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing the efficacy of a job rotation for improving occupational physical and psychosocial work environment, musculoskeletal health, social equality, production quality, and resilience at a commercial laundromat: Protocol for a longitudinal case study
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2023 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 5, article id e067633Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Job rotation is a work organization strategy used to reduce work‐related exposures and musculoskeletal complaints, yet evidence for the efficacy of the approach is weak. Mismatch between job rotation and company needs, lack of full implementation, lack of exposure variation in included tasks, and failure to assess variation may underlie inconclusive research findings to date. The study aims to develop a job rotation with company stakeholders, perform a process evaluation of the implementation, and determine the extent to which the intervention improves the physical and psychosocial work environment, indicators of health, gender and social equality among workers, and production quality and resilience.

Methods and analysis: Approximately 60 production workers at a Swedish commercial laundromat will be recruited. Physical and psychosocial work environment conditions, health, productivity and gender and social equality will be assessed pre‐ and post‐ intervention using surveys, accelerometers, heart rate, electromyography and focus groups. A task‐based exposure matrix will be constructed, and exposure variation estimated at the level of the individual worker pre‐ and post‐ intervention. An implementation process evaluation will be conducted. Job rotation efficacy will be assessed in terms of improvement in work environment conditions, health, gender and social inequality, and production quality and resilience. This study will provide novel information on the effects of the job rotation on physical and psychosocial work environment conditions, production quality and rate, health, and gender and social inequality among blue‐collar workers in a highly multicultural workplace.

Ethics and dissemination: The study received approval from the Swedish Ethical Review Authority. Results of the project will be shared directly with the employees, managers and union representatives from the participating company, other relevant labour market stakeholders, and with researchers at national and international conferences and via scientific publication.

Trial registration: The study is pre‐registered with the Open Science Framework (https://osf.io/zmdc8/).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ, 2023
Keywords
repetitive work, variation, work task organization, work rotation, job rotation, musculoskeletal health, intervention, implementation, co‐creation, co‐created program logic, process and outcome evaluation
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work; Intelligent Industry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-38429 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2022-067633 (DOI)001001500800007 ()37173106 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85159738922 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-01761
Available from: 2022-04-20 Created: 2022-04-20 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Kaltenbrunner, M., Mathiassen, S. E., Bengtsson, L., Högberg, H. & Engström, M. (2023). Associations between lean maturity in primary care and musculoskeletal complaints among staff. A longitudinal study. BMJ Open, 13, Article ID e067753.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between lean maturity in primary care and musculoskeletal complaints among staff. A longitudinal study
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2023 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, article id e067753Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. We had two aims: 1) to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints among staff in primary care 2) to determine to what extent Lean maturity of the primary care unit can predict musculoskeletal complaints one year later. 

Design. Descriptive, correlational, and longitudinal design.

Setting. Primary care units in mid-Sweden.

Participants. In 2015, staff members responded to a web survey addressing Lean maturity and musculoskeletal complaints. The survey was completed by 481 staff members (response rate 46%) at 48 units; 260 staff members at 46 units also completed the survey in 2016. 

Outcome measures. Associations with musculoskeletal complaints were determined both for Lean maturity in total, and for four Lean domains entered separately in a multivariate model, i.e., Philosophy, Processes, People and partners, and Problem-solving.     

Results. The shoulders (12-month prevalence 58%), neck (54%), and low back (50%) were the most common sites of 12-months retrospective musculoskeletal complaints at baseline. Shoulders, neck, and low back also showed the most complaints for the preceding 7 days (37%, 33%, and 25%, respectively). The prevalence of complaints was similar at the 1-year follow-up. Total lean maturity in 2015 was not associated with musculoskeletal complaints, neither cross-sectionally nor one year later, for shoulders (one-year β: -0.002, 95% CI -.03 to .02), neck (β: 0.006, 95% CI -.01 to .03), low back (β: 0.004, 95% CI -.02 to .03) and upper back (β: 0.002, 95% CI -.02; .02). 

Conclusion. The prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints among primary care staff was high and did not change within a year. The extent of Lean maturity at the care unit was not associated with complaints among staff, neither in cross-sectional analyses nor in a one-year predictive analysis

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ, 2023
Keywords
Lean in Health care Questionnaire (LiHcQ), musculoskeletal disorders (MSD), Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ), pain
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-37260 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2022-067753 (DOI)000944467100029 ()36813498 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85148548320 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-10-22 Created: 2021-10-22 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Svensson, S., Mathiassen, S. E., Hallman, D., Heiden, M. & Bergström, G. (2023). Associations between telework experience and psychosocial working conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic: A cross-sectional analysis among white-collar workers in Sweden. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 65(2), e74-e82
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between telework experience and psychosocial working conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic: A cross-sectional analysis among white-collar workers in Sweden
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 65, no 2, p. e74-e82Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To determine to what extent pre-COVID-19 experience of telework was associated with perceived psychosocial working conditions (PWC; job demands, social support and influence at work) during the COVID-19 pandemic among white-collar workers in Sweden, and to determine to what extent the association depends on demographic factors, organizational tenure, and amount of computer use.

Methods: Cross-sectional questionnaire data from 603 white-collar workers were collected October-December 2020 in an industrial company.

Results: In general, telework experience was not significantly associated with PWC. Women who began teleworking due to COVID-19 reported more job demands than women not teleworking. For those who began teleworking due to COVID-19, managerial support increased with age.

Conclusion: In general, telework experience was not associated with PWC, but telework due to COVID-19 may have influenced PWC differently depending on gender and age.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WoltersKluwer, 2023
Keywords
Telework; COVID-19; Job demands; Influence at work; Social support
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work; Health-Promoting Work, Flexibelt arbete
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-39433 (URN)10.1097/JOM.0000000000002758 (DOI)000925880100008 ()36729912 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85147457310 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-01257
Available from: 2022-07-04 Created: 2022-07-04 Last updated: 2023-05-02Bibliographically approved
Liaset, I., Steiro Fimland, M., Holtermann, A., Mathiassen, S. E. & Redzovic, S. (2023). Can home care work be organized to promote health among the workers while maintaining productivity? An investigation into stakeholders’ perspectives on organizational work redesign concepts based on the Goldilocks Work principles. BMC Health Services Research, 23, Article ID 667.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can home care work be organized to promote health among the workers while maintaining productivity? An investigation into stakeholders’ perspectives on organizational work redesign concepts based on the Goldilocks Work principles
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2023 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 23, article id 667Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Due to the aging population, the need for home care services is increasing in most Western countries, including Norway. However, the highly physical nature of this job could contribute to make recruiting and retaining qualified home care workers (HCWs) challenging. This issue may be overcome by adopting the Goldilocks Work principles, aiming at promoting workers’ physical health by determining a “just right” balance between work demands and recovery periods while maintaining productivity. The aim of this study was to 1) gather suggestions from home care employees on suitable organizational redesign concepts for promoting HCWs physical health and 2) have researchers and managers define actionable behavioral aims for the HCWs for each proposed (re)design concept and evaluate them in the context of the Goldilocks Work principles. 

Methods

HCWs, safety representatives, and operation coordinators (n = 14) from three Norwegian home care units participated in digital workshops led by a researcher. They suggested, ranked, and discussed redesign concepts aimed at promoting HCWs’ health. The redesign concepts were subsequently operationalized and evaluated by three researchers and three home care managers.

Results

Workshop participants suggested five redesign concepts, namely "operation coordinators should distribute work lists with different occupational physical activity demands more evenly between HCWs", " operation coordinators should distribute transportation modes more evenly between HCWs", "Managers facilitate correct use of ergonomic aids and techniques", "HCWs should use the stairs instead of the elevator", and "HCWs should participate in home-based exercise training with clients". Only the first two redesign concepts were considered to be aligned with the Goldilocks Work principles. A corresponding behavioral aim for a “just right” workload was defined: reduce inter-individual differences in occupational physical activity throughout a work week.

Conclusions 

Operation coordinators could have a key role in health-promoting organizational work redesign based on the Goldilocks Work principles in home care. By reducing the inter-individual differences in occupational physical activity throughout a work week, HCWs’ health may be improved, thus reducing absenteeism and increasing the sustainability of home care services. The two suggested redesign concepts should be considered areas for evaluation and adoption in practice by researchers and home care services in similar settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC, 2023
Keywords
job redesign, participatory approach, workplace health promotion, home health care, elder care
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-41048 (URN)10.1186/s12913-023-09691-2 (DOI)001009867700001 ()37340464 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85162915303 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-02-08 Created: 2023-02-08 Last updated: 2023-07-10Bibliographically approved
Projects
Forte-centre Working Life: The Body at Work - from problem to potential [2009-01761_Forte]; University of Gävle; Publications
Jackson, J., Sund, M., Barlari Lobos, G., Melin, L. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2023). Assessing the efficacy of a job rotation for improving occupational physical and psychosocial work environment, musculoskeletal health, social equality, production quality, and resilience at a commercial laundromat: Protocol for a longitudinal case study. BMJ Open, 13(5), Article ID e067633. Jackson, J., Srinivasan, D. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2020). Consistent individual motor variability traits demonstrated by females performing a long-cycle assembly task under conditions differing in temporal organisation. Applied Ergonomics, 85, Article ID 103046. Jahncke, H. & Hallman, D. (2020). Objective measures of cognitive performance in activity based workplaces and traditional office types. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 72, Article ID 101503. Hallman, D., Holtermann, A., Dencker-Larsen, S., Birk Jorgensen, M. & Nørregaard Rasmussen, C. (2019). Are trajectories of neck-shoulder pain associated with sick leave and work ability in workers? A 1-year prospective study. BMJ Open, 9, Article ID e022006. Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E., van der Beek, A., Jackson, J. & Coenen, P. (2019). Calibration of self-reported time spent sitting, standing and walking among office workers: a compositional data analysis. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(17), Article ID 3111. Domkin, D., Forsman, M. & Richter, H. O. (2019). Effect of ciliary-muscle contraction force on trapezius muscle activity during computer mouse work. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 119(2), 389-397Bohman, T., Bottai, M. & Björklund, M. (2019). Predictive models for short-term and long-term improvement in women under physiotherapy for chronic disabling neck pain: a longitudinal cohort study. BMJ Open, 9(4), Article ID e024557. Holtermann, A., Mathiassen, S. E. & Straker, L. (2019). Promoting health and physical capacity during productive work: the Goldilocks Principle. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 45(1), 90-97Hallman, D., Holtermann, A., Björklund, M., Gupta, N. & Nørregaard Rasmussen, C. D. (2019). Sick leave due to musculoskeletal pain : determinants of distinct trajectories over 1 year. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 92(8), 1099-1108Gupta, N., Heiden, M., Mathiassen, S. E. & Holtermann, A. (2018). Is self-reported time spent sedentary and in physical activity differentially biased by age, gender, body mass index and low-back pain?. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 44(2), 163-170
FIIP: Motor Variability in Occupational Work: Determinants & Physiological effects [2011-00075_Forte]; University of GävleAlternerande fysisk och kognitiv arbetsbelastning - effekter på prestation, trötthet och återhämtning [120223]; University of Gävle; Publications
Mixter, S. (2021). Combining cognitive and physical work tasks: Short-term effects on fatigue, stress, performance and recovery. (Doctoral dissertation). Gävle: Gävle University PressJahncke, H., Hygge, S., Mathiassen, S. E., Hallman, D., Mixter, S. & Lyskov, E. (2017). Variation at work: alternations between physically and mentally demanding tasks in blue-collar occupations. Ergonomics, 60(9), 1218-1227Jahncke, H., Hygge, S., Mathiassen, S. E., Hallman, D., Mixter, S. & Lyskov, E. (2016). A cross-sectional study of alternations between physical and mental tasks. In: : . Paper presented at Ninth International Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders (PREMUS), June 20-23, 2016, Toronto, Canada. Mixter, S., Mathiassen, S. E., Jahncke, H., Hallman, D. & Lindfors, P. (2016). Does the difficulty of a memory task interspersed between bouts of repetitive work influence recovery?. In: : . Paper presented at Ninth International Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders (PREMUS), Toronto, June 20-23, 2016 (pp. 398). Mixter, S., Mathiassen, S. E., Jahncke, H., Hygge, S., Lyskov, E., Hallman, D. & Lewis, C. Effects of combining physical and cognitive work tasks - a systematic review.
Betydelsen av psykosociala förhållanden i arbetsmiljön för fysisk belastning, smärta och sjukfrånvaro i äldreomsorgen [180076]; University of Gävle; Publications
Januario, L., Mathiassen, S. E., Holtermann, A., Bergström, G., Stevens, M. L., Rugulies, R. & Hallman, D. (2023). Ward-level leadership quality and prospective low-back pain of eldercare workers – do resident handlings mediate the association?. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 96, 1049-1059
Effekter av en extern kris på arbetsmiljö, hälsa och jämlikhet bland svensk och utlandsfödd arbetskraft: en fallstudie på ett tvätteri [200243]; University of Gävle
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1443-6211

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