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Mathiassen, Svend ErikORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1443-6211
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 297) Show all publications
Holtermann, A., Mathiassen, S. E. & Straker, L. (2019). Promoting health and physical capacity during productive work: the Goldilocks Principle. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 45(1), 90-97
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Promoting health and physical capacity during productive work: the Goldilocks Principle
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 90-97Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

In spite of preventive efforts, organizations and employees face several challenges related to working life and occupational health, such as a substantial prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders, social inequality in health and physical capacity, multi-morbidity, an obesity epidemic and an aging workforce. We argue that a new approach for occupational ergonomics and health is required, going beyond prevention of harm caused by work. We propose the ´Goldilocks Principle´ as a new approach of how productive work can be designed to literally promote health and physical capacity.

Methods                 

Physical (in)activity profoundly influences health and physical capacity, with effects depending on the extent and temporal structure of the (in)activity. Like the porridge, chair and bed that needed to be ‘just right’ for Goldilocks in the fairy-tale of ´The Three Bears´, physical activity during productive work needs to be ‘just right’ for promoting rather than deteriorating health and capacity. In many jobs, physical activity is, however, either ’too much/high/frequent’ or ’too little/low/infrequent’ to give positive biomechanical and cardiometabolic stimuli.

Results

The paper presents the rationale, concept, development, application and prospects of the Goldilocks Principle for how productive work can be designed to promote health and physical capacity.

Conclusions

We envision a great potential to promote health and physical capacity by designing productive work according to the Goldilocks Principle, thus leading to benefits with respect to the current challenges related to working life and occupational health for society, organizations and employees.

Keywords
Physical activity; Physical work demands; Sedentary behaviour; Workplace health promotion; Ergonomics; Occupational health
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26505 (URN)10.5271/sjweh.3754 (DOI)30021029 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Available from: 2018-04-25 Created: 2018-04-25 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Haapakangas, A., Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E. & Jahncke, H. (2019). The effects of moving into an activity-based office on communication, social relations and work demands – A controlled intervention with repeated follow-up.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of moving into an activity-based office on communication, social relations and work demands – A controlled intervention with repeated follow-up
2019 (English)In: Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29117 (URN)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Available from: 2019-01-15 Created: 2019-01-15 Last updated: 2019-02-13Bibliographically approved
Heiden, M., Zetterberg, C. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2019). Trunk and upper arm postures in paper mill work. Applied Ergonomics, 70, 90-96
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trunk and upper arm postures in paper mill work
2019 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 70, p. 90-96Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to assess postures andmovements of the trunk and upper arm during paper mill work, and to determinethe extent to which they differ depending on method of assessment. For each oftwenty-eight paper mill workers, postures and movements were assessed duringthree full shifts using inclinometer registration and observation from video. Summary metrics for each shift, e.g.,10th, 50th, and 90th posture percentile, were averagedacross shifts and across workers. In addition, the standard deviation between workers,and the standard deviation between shifts within worker were computed. The resultsshowed that trunk and arm postures during paper mill work were similar to otheroccupations involving manual materials handling, but the velocity of armmovements were lower. While postures determined by inclinometry and observationwere similar on a group level, substantial differences were found betweenresults obtained by the two methods for individual workers, particularly for extremepostures. Thus, measurements by either method on individuals or small groupsshould be interpreted with caution.

Keywords
exposure, inclinometry, observation
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26535 (URN)10.1016/j.apergo.2018.12.004 (DOI)2-s2.0-85058455988 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2010-0748Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Available from: 2018-05-03 Created: 2018-05-03 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Barbieri, D., Srinivasan, D., Mathiassen, S. E. & Oliveira, A. B. (2019). Variation in upper extremity, neck and trunk postures when performing computer work at a sit-stand station. Applied Ergonomics, 75, 120-128
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Variation in upper extremity, neck and trunk postures when performing computer work at a sit-stand station
2019 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 75, p. 120-128Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to determine the extent of upper arm, neck and trunk posture variation that can be obtained by combining seated and standing computer work, compared to performing only seated computer work. Posture data were recorded for two hours during each of three days of ordinary work from 24 office workers that had been using a sit-stand station for two months. Periods with sitting and standing computer work were identified using on-site observations, and posture means and minute-to-minute variance were determined for both. Expected minute-to-minute posture variability in different temporal combinations of sitting and standing computer work were determined by simulation, and expressed in terms of a Job Variance Ratio, i.e. the relative increase in variability compared to sitting-only work. For all three postures, mean values differed between sitting and standing computer work, and both showed a notable minute-to-minute variability. For most workers, posture variability was larger when combining sitting and standing than when sitting only, and simulations suggested to introduce more standing than what the worker currently practiced. The results indicate that introducing a sit-stand table could, for most office workers, have a positive effect on upper arm, neck and trunk posture variability.

Keywords
office work; adjustable table; job variance ratio (JVR); sedentary behaviors, trunk flexion, upper arm elevation
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23157 (URN)10.1016/j.apergo.2018.09.012 (DOI)000454371900010 ()30509516 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-8505417244 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Note

Funders:

Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq) Grant n:o 472946/2013-7

Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP) Grant n:o 2015/19504-4

Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP) Grant n:o 2012/24502-2

National Council for Scientific Research

Available from: 2016-12-24 Created: 2016-12-24 Last updated: 2019-01-28Bibliographically approved
Gupta, N., Mathiassen, S. E., Mateu-Figueras, G., Heiden, M., Hallman, D., Birk Jørgensen, M. & Holtermann, A. (2018). A comparison of standard and compositional analysis in studies addressing group differences in sedentary behavior and physical activity. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 15(1), Article ID 53.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparison of standard and compositional analysis in studies addressing group differences in sedentary behavior and physical activity
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, ISSN 1479-5868, E-ISSN 1479-5868, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Data on time spent in physical activity, sedentary behavior and sleep during a day is compositional in nature, i.e. they add up to a constant value, typically 100% time. Compositional data have fundamentally different properties from unconstrained data in real space, and require other processing and analysis procedures, referred to as compositional data analysis (CoDA). Most physical activity and sedentary behavior studies, however, still apply analytical procedures adapted to data in real space, which can lead to misleading results. The present study describes a comparison of time spent sedentary and in physical activity between age groups and sexes, and investigates the extent to which results obtained by CoDA differ from those obtained using standard analytical procedures.

Methods. Time spent sedentary, standing, and in physical activity (walking/running/stair climbing/cycling) during work and leisure was determined for 1-4 days among 677 blue-collar workers using accelerometry. Differences between sexes and age groups were tested using MANOVA, using both a standard approach and a CoDA approach based on isometric log-ratio transformed data.  

Results. When determining differences between sexes in time used for different activities at work, the effect size using standard analysis (η2=0.045, p<0.001) was 15% smaller than that obtained with CoDA (η2=0.052, p<0.001), although both approaches suggested a statistically significant difference. When determining corresponding differences between age groups, CoDA resulted in a 60% larger, and significant, effect size (η2=0.012, p=0.02) than that obtained with the standard approach (η2=0.008, p=0.07). During leisure, results with standard (age; η2=0.007, p=0.09; sex; η2=0.052, p<0.001) and CoDA (age; η2=0.007, p=0.09; sex; η2=0.051, p<0.001) analyses were similar.

Conclusion. Results and, hence, inferences concerning differences by age and sex in time spent sedentary and in physical activity at work differed between CoDA and standard analysis. We encourage researchers to use CoDA in similar studies, in order to adequately account for the compositional nature of data on physical activity and sedentary behavior

Keywords
CoDA, accelerometry, MANOVA, isometric log-ratio, gender, age groups
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25483 (URN)10.1186/s12966-018-0685-1 (DOI)000435403500001 ()29903009 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85048626702 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Note

Funding agencies:

- Danish government

- Danish Work Environment Research Fund grant no: 20150017496/4

Available from: 2017-11-02 Created: 2017-11-02 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Mixter, S., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2018). Alternations between physical and cognitive tasks in repetitive work – Effect of cognitive task difficulty on fatigue development. Ergonomics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alternations between physical and cognitive tasks in repetitive work – Effect of cognitive task difficulty on fatigue development
2018 (English)In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

In a context of job rotation, the present study determined the extent to which the difficulty of a cognitive task (CT) interspersed between bouts of repetitive, low-force work influence recovery.

Fifteen female participants performed three experimental sessions with 10 repeats of a 7min+3min combination of physical and cognitive tasks (CT). The CT was either easy, moderate or hard. During sessions, muscle activity was recorded using surface electromyography, and participants rated fatigue and pain.

Muscle activity and ratings of perceived fatigue increased during work. Cognitive task difficulty influenced fatigue development marginally, apart from forearm extensor EMG increasing slower with the hard CT.  During the CT periods, EMG and perceived fatigue partly recovered, and to the same extent with all three CT difficulties.

In conclusion, CT difficulty had marginal effects on recovery from fatigue and may, thus, not be a critical issue in job rotation schemes with alternating physical and cognitive tasks.

Keywords
Repetitive work, fatigue, recovery, physical load, mental load, variation
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26536 (URN)
Funder
AFA Insurance, 120223
Available from: 2018-05-03 Created: 2018-05-03 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Mixter, S., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2018). Alternations between physical and mental tasks – a viable option for job rotation?. In: : . Paper presented at 20th Congress International Ergonomics Association, 26-30 August, 2018, Florens, Italy.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alternations between physical and mental tasks – a viable option for job rotation?
2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27878 (URN)
Conference
20th Congress International Ergonomics Association, 26-30 August, 2018, Florens, Italy
Funder
AFA Insurance
Available from: 2018-09-07 Created: 2018-09-07 Last updated: 2018-09-10Bibliographically approved
Straker, L., Hall, C., Holtermann, A., van der Beek, A., Huijsmans, M., Mathiassen, S. E. & Gilson, N. (2018). Blue‐collar worker sedentary exposure at work and non‐work: systematic review of studies using objective measurement. In: : . Paper presented at 20th Congress International Ergonomics Association, 26-30 augusti, 2018, Florens, Italy.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Blue‐collar worker sedentary exposure at work and non‐work: systematic review of studies using objective measurement
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2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27831 (URN)
Conference
20th Congress International Ergonomics Association, 26-30 augusti, 2018, Florens, Italy
Available from: 2018-09-04 Created: 2018-09-04 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
Forsman, M., Barkstedt, V. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2018). Can Borg’s RPE‐scale be used as an estimate of workday energy consumption in physicallydemanding work?. In: : . Paper presented at 20th Congress International Ergonomics Association, 26-30 augusti, 2018, Florens, Italy.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can Borg’s RPE‐scale be used as an estimate of workday energy consumption in physicallydemanding work?
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27828 (URN)
Conference
20th Congress International Ergonomics Association, 26-30 augusti, 2018, Florens, Italy
Available from: 2018-09-04 Created: 2018-09-04 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
Huysmans, M. A., Srinivasan, D. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2018). Consistency of sedentary behavior patterns among office workers with long-term access to sit-stand workstations. Annals of Occupational Hygiene
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consistency of sedentary behavior patterns among office workers with long-term access to sit-stand workstations
2018 (English)In: Annals of Occupational Hygiene, ISSN 0003-4878, E-ISSN 1475-3162Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Keywords
Temporal patterns, sitting time, day-to-day variability, individual differences, computer work, variance component analysis
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27606 (URN)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Available from: 2018-07-29 Created: 2018-07-29 Last updated: 2018-12-03Bibliographically approved
Projects
Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor [TRV 2015/43010]; University of Gävle; Publications
Haapakangas, A., Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E. & Jahncke, H. (2018). Self-rated productivity and employee well-being in activity-based offices: the role of environmental perceptions and workspace use. Building and Environment, 145, 115-124Jahncke, H., Persson, L. & Hallman, D. (2017). Aktivitetsbaserade arbetsplatser: Koncentration, stillasittande och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor: Kartläggning år 2015-2017. Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor A: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor B: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor C: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor D: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor E: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i Gävle
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1443-6211

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