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Mathiassen, Svend ErikORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1443-6211
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Publications (10 of 313) Show all publications
Mixter, S., Mathiassen, S. E., Hallman, D. & Bjärntoft, S. (2019). Alternations between physical and cognitive tasks – does temporal pattern and cognitive task difficulty influence fatigue development?. In: : . Paper presented at 10th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders, 2-5 September 2019, Bologna, Italy.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alternations between physical and cognitive tasks – does temporal pattern and cognitive task difficulty influence fatigue development?
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background

Some evidence suggests that alternations between physical and cognitive work tasks may be a viable option for job rotation, since production can be maintained without excessive fatigue. Effects on fatigue and pain of the temporal distribution of physical and cognitive tasks are, however, uncertain. The aim of this study was to examine development of fatigue and pain during physical and cognitive work tasks of different difficulties, alternating in different temporal patterns.

Methods

Fifteen women performed alternating bouts of a physical task (phys) and a cognitive task (CT) for a total of 100 minutes. Four experimental conditions were tested in a repeated-measures design. Conditions 1 and 2 consisted of five long-cycle sequences (phys+CT, 14+6 minutes), and in conditions 3 and 4, 10 short-cycle sequences (7+3 minutes) were performed. Each temporal pattern was completed with an easy or a difficult CT. Muscle fatigue was assessed using surface electromyography (EMG) from the right trapezius, and perceived fatigue and pain in the right shoulder was assessed using CR-10 ratings. Effects of time and experimental condition on these outcomes were tested using ANOVA.

Results

Perceived fatigue and pain in right shoulder after pipetting work bouts increased in all four conditions (long-cycle, fatigue F=5.68, p<0.001, pain F=4.12, p=0.01; short-cycle, fatigue F=10.59, p<0.001, pain F=5.45, p<0.001). Trapezius EMG did not change significantly across work bouts (long-cycle, F=2.14, p=0.09; short-cycle, F=1.03, p=0.42). Irrespective of the temporal alternation pattern, neither EMG nor fatigue and pain were influenced by CT difficulty (CT main effect and CT×time interaction: EMG, all F≤2.5, p≥0.1; fatigue and pain, all F≤2.0, p≥0.7).

Conclusions

The temporal pattern of alternations between a repetitive physical task and a CT did not influence fatigue development, and the difficulty level of the CT did not significantly influence fatigue and pain, irrespective of the temporal alternation pattern.

National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30731 (URN)
Conference
10th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders, 2-5 September 2019, Bologna, Italy
Funder
AFA Insurance, 120223
Available from: 2019-10-04 Created: 2019-10-04 Last updated: 2019-10-14Bibliographically approved
Mixter, S., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2019). Alternations between physical and cognitive tasks in repetitive work – Effect of cognitive task difficulty on fatigue development in women. Ergonomics, 62(8), 1008-1022
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alternations between physical and cognitive tasks in repetitive work – Effect of cognitive task difficulty on fatigue development in women
2019 (English)In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 62, no 8, p. 1008-1022Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In a context of job rotation, this study determined the extent to which the difficulty of a cognitive task (CT) interspersed between bouts of repetitive, low-intensity work (pipetting) influences recovery from fatigue. Fifteen participants performed three experimental sessions, each comprising 10 repeats of a 7 min + 3 min combination of pipetting and CT. The CT was easy, moderate or hard. Surface electromyography (EMG amplitude of the forearm extensor and trapezius muscles) and self-reports was used to assess fatigability. Perceived fatigue and trapezius EMG amplitude increased during sessions. CT difficulty influenced fatigue development only little, besides forearm extensor EMG increasing more in CT3 than in CT1 and CT2. During CT bouts, fatigability recovered, and to a similar extent irrespective of CT. Thus, CT difficulty influenced recovery of perceived as well as performance fatigability to a minor extent, and may not be a critical issue in job rotation comprising alternating physical and cognitive tasks.

Keywords
Repetitive work, fatigue, recovery, physical load, mental load, variation
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26536 (URN)10.1080/00140139.2019.1614229 (DOI)000469647700001 ()31056015 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065848351 (Scopus ID)
Funder
AFA Insurance, 120223
Available from: 2018-05-03 Created: 2018-05-03 Last updated: 2019-08-19Bibliographically approved
Coenen, P., van der Beek, A. J., Jackson, J. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2019). Calibration of self-reported physical behaviours among office workers: A compositional data analysis. In: ICAMPAM 2019: Oral Abstracts. Paper presented at ICAMPAM, June 26-28 2019, Maastricht, Netherlands. Maastricht: ICAMPAM, Article ID O.11.2.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Calibration of self-reported physical behaviours among office workers: A compositional data analysis
2019 (English)In: ICAMPAM 2019: Oral Abstracts, Maastricht: ICAMPAM , 2019, article id O.11.2Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate calibration models to predict objectively measured time spent sitting, standing and walking during office work from self-reported time-use compositions using a compositional data analysis (CoDA) approach. Ninety-nine office workers (49 women) at the Swedish Transport Administration participated in an intervention study on relocation to activity-based offices. At baseline and at a 3-months follow-up, physical behaviours (sitting, standing and walking) at work were assessed for five days using a thigh-mounted accelerometer (Actigraph) and by self-report (IPAQ). The time-use composition of the three behaviours was expressed in terms of isometric log-ratios (ILR). Calibration models predicting accelerometry-based time-use from self-reported compositions were constructed using linear regression on baseline data, and then validated using follow-up data. The accelerometer data showed that, on average, workers spent 69.9% of their day sitting, 23.7% standing, and 6.4% walking. The corresponding percentages for self-reports were 71.7%, 21.6%, and 7.4%, respectively. Non-calibrated self-reports were biased: the RMS errors obtained from the ILRs expressing sitting, standing and walking were 0.73, 1.09 and 1.05, respectively. Calibration models reduced these errors by 45% (sitting), 56% (standing), and 76% (walking). Validation of the calibration models using follow-up data from the same workers showed calibration remained equally effective; RMS errors were reduced by 55% (sitting), 58% (standing), and 75% (walking). In conclusion, calibration models for compositional time-use data were effective in reducing bias in self-reported physical behaviours at work, and the models remained effective when used on new data from the same workers. Calibrated self-reports may represent a cost-effective method for obtaining physical behaviour data with a satisfying accuracy in large-scale cohort and intervention studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Maastricht: ICAMPAM, 2019
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30410 (URN)
Conference
ICAMPAM, June 26-28 2019, Maastricht, Netherlands
Available from: 2019-07-05 Created: 2019-07-05 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E., van der Beek, A., Jackson, J. & Coenen, P. (2019). Calibration of self-reported time spent sitting, standing and walking among office workers: a compositional data analysis. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(17), Article ID 3111.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Calibration of self-reported time spent sitting, standing and walking among office workers: a compositional data analysis
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 17, article id 3111Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We developed and evaluated calibration models predicting objectively measured sitting, standing and walking time from self-reported data using a compositional data analysis (CoDA) approach. A total of 98 office workers (48 women) at the Swedish Transport Administration participated. At baseline and three-months follow-up, time spent sitting, standing and walking at work was assessed for five working days using a thigh-worn accelerometer (Actigraph), as well as by self-report (IPAQ). Individual compositions of time spent in the three behaviors were expressed by isometric log-ratios (ILR). Calibration models predicting objectively measured ILRs from self-reported ILRs were constructed using baseline data, and then validated using follow-up data. Un-calibrated self-reports were inaccurate; root-mean-square (RMS) errors of ILRs for sitting, standing and walking were 1.21, 1.24 and 1.03, respectively. Calibration reduced these errors to 36% (sitting), 40% (standing), and 24% (walking) of those prior to calibration. Calibration models remained effective for follow-up data, reducing RMS errors to 33% (sitting), 51% (standing), and 31% (walking). Thus, compositional calibration models were effective in reducing errors in self-reported physical behaviors during office work. Calibration of self-reports may present a cost-e_ective method for obtaining physical behavior data with satisfying accuracy in large-scale cohort and intervention studies.

Keywords
physical activity; sedentary behavior; oce work; accuracy; calibration; compositional data analysis
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30597 (URN)10.3390/ijerph16173111 (DOI)000487037500106 ()31461868 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85071631368 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-01761
Available from: 2019-08-28 Created: 2019-08-28 Last updated: 2019-10-14Bibliographically approved
Johansson, E., Mathiassen, S. E., Lund Rasmussen, C., Lyskov, E. & Hallman, D. (2019). Compositional analysis of sedentary behavior and physical activity during work and leisure among male and female office workers. In: : . Paper presented at 6th International Conference on Ambulatory Monitoring of Physical Activity and Movement (ICAMPAM), 26-28 June 2019, Maastricht, The Netherlands. , Article ID 1-45.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Compositional analysis of sedentary behavior and physical activity during work and leisure among male and female office workers
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2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Objective: To determine the extent to which male and female office workers differ in their time-use composition of sitting behaviors (SB) and physical activity (PA) during work and leisure.

Methods: SB and PA was measured using thigh-worn accelerometers for up to 8 full days in 77 male and 104 female office workers. Daily time-use compositions during work and leisure were described in four exhaustive categories, i.e. sitting in short (<30  min) and long (≥30 min) bouts, standing, and active behaviors. Following a compositional data analysis procedure, isometric log-ratios (ilr) were calculated to express time in sitting relative to non-sitting, short relative to long sitting bouts, and standing relative to active behaviors. Differences between sexes (men and women) and domains (work and leisure) were examined on the basis of these ilrs using ANOVA.

Results: At work, time spent sitting in short bouts, long bouts, standing, and active was, on average, 34%, 36%, 22% and 8% among men and 31%, 37%, 24% and 8% among women. Corresponding proportions during leisure were 34%, 25%, 28% and 13% among men and 29%, 28%, 31% and 12% among women. Time spent sitting relative to non-sitting differed significantly between work and leisure (ilr sitting-vs-non-sitting, partial eta squared=0.09, p<0.01). During leisure, men used proportionally more time than women in short sitting bouts (ilr short-vs-long, partial eta squared=0.06, p<0.01) and spent more time in active behaviors relative to standing (ilr standing-vs-active, partial eta squared=0.04, p<0.01). No significant sex differences were observed during work (p>0.05).

Conclusions:  The leisure behavior observed among men is probably more beneficial for health than that observed for women. However, both men and women spent a major proportion of their time sitting, both at and outside their office work, and they were, in general, only little active. Thus, both men and women could benefit from interventions to reduce SB and increase PA both at work and during leisure.

National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30450 (URN)
Conference
6th International Conference on Ambulatory Monitoring of Physical Activity and Movement (ICAMPAM), 26-28 June 2019, Maastricht, The Netherlands
Note

ICAMPAM 2019 Poster abstracts: https://ismpb.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/ICAMPAM2019PosterAbstracts.pdf

Available from: 2019-07-29 Created: 2019-07-29 Last updated: 2019-09-23
Huysmans, M. A., Srinivasan, D. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2019). Consistency of sedentary behavior patterns among office workers with long-term access to sit-stand workstations. Annals of Work Exposures and Health, 63(5), 583-591
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consistency of sedentary behavior patterns among office workers with long-term access to sit-stand workstations
2019 (English)In: Annals of Work Exposures and Health, ISSN 2398-7308, Vol. 63, no 5, p. 583-591Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Sit-stand workstations are a popular intervention to reduce sedentary behavior (SB) in office settings. However, the extent and distribution of SB in office workers long-term accustomed to using sit-stand workstations as a natural part of their work environment are largely unknown. In the present study, we aimed to describe patterns of SB in office workers with long-term access to sit-stand workstations and to determine the extent to which these patterns vary between days and workers. METHODS: SB was objectively monitored using thigh-worn accelerometers for a full week in 24 office workers who had been equipped with a sit-stand workstation for at least 10 months. A comprehensive set of variables describing SB was calculated for each workday and worker, and distributions of these variables between days and workers were examined. RESULTS: On average, workers spent 68% work time sitting [standard deviation (SD) between workers and between days (within worker): 10.4 and 18.2%]; workers changed from sitting to standing/walking 3.2 times per hour (SDs 0.6 and 1.2 h-1); with bouts of sitting being 14.9 min long (SDs 4.2 and 8.5 min). About one-third of the workers spent >75% of their workday sitting. Between-workers variability was significantly different from zero only for percent work time sitting, while between-days (within-worker) variability was substantial for all SB variables. CONCLUSIONS: Office workers accustomed to using sit-stand workstations showed homogeneous patterns of SB when averaged across several days, except for percent work time seated. However, SB differed substantially between days for any individual worker. The finding that many workers were extensively sedentary suggests that just access to sit-stand workstations may not be a sufficient remedy against SB; additional personalized interventions reinforcing use may be needed. To this end, differences in SB between days should be acknowledged as a potentially valuable source of variation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
Temporal patterns, sitting time, day-to-day variability, individual differences, computer work, variance component analysis
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27606 (URN)10.1093/annweh/wxz022 (DOI)000493122200009 ()31008506 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85066456948 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Note

Also funding from the employers of the authors; the University of Gävle, Amsterdam UMC, and Virginia Tech USA

Available from: 2018-07-29 Created: 2018-07-29 Last updated: 2019-11-22Bibliographically approved
Jackson, J., Srinivasan, D. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2019). Consistent individual motor variability traits demonstrated by females performing a long-cycle assembly task under conditions differing in temporal organisation. Applied Ergonomics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consistent individual motor variability traits demonstrated by females performing a long-cycle assembly task under conditions differing in temporal organisation
2019 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

Low motor variability (MV) during repetitive work has shown association with higher risk for developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). Whether consistent individual MV characteristics exist across working conditions remains unknown. This study aimed to determine if individual MV traits were consistent during complex assembly work performed under conditions differing in temporal organisation.

Fifteen women performed cyclic-assembly under four conditions differing in pace and organisation (line-type, batch-type). Variability of trapezius muscle activity and upper arm elevation was quantified. Total MV variance was partitioned into components attributable to subjects, days and conditions.

For all metrics, a non-zero between-subjects variance was found, indicating consistent individual MV traits across conditions. Variance between subjects was higher for EMG MV metrics compared with kinematic metrics.

Our results showed individuals exhibited consistent MV traits across working conditions differing in pace and production process, and support continued research into MV as a possible individual risk factor for MSDs.

Keywords
motor control, trapezius electromyography, upper arm elevation angle
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30605 (URN)
Available from: 2019-08-28 Created: 2019-08-28 Last updated: 2019-11-29Bibliographically approved
Coenen, P., Mathiassen, S. E., van der Beek, A. & Hallman, D. (2019). Correction of bias in self-reported sitting time among office workers – a study based on compositional data analysis. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correction of bias in self-reported sitting time among office workers – a study based on compositional data analysis
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Objective: Emerging evidence suggests that excessive sitting has negative health effects. However, this evidence largely relies on research using self-reported sitting time, which is known to be biased. To correct this bias, we aimed at developing a calibration model estimating "true" sitting from self-reported sitting.

Methods: Occupational sitting time was estimated by self-reports (the International Physical Activity Questionnaire) and objective measurements (thigh-worn accelerometer) among 99 Swedish office workers at a governmental agency, at baseline and 3 and 12 months afterwards. Following compositional data analysis procedures, both sitting estimates were transformed into isometric log-ratios (ILR). This effectively addresses that times spent in various activities are inherently dependent and can be presented as values of only 0−100%. Linear regression was used to develop a simple calibration model estimating objectively measured "true" sitting ILR (dependent variable) from self-reported sitting ILR (independent variable). Additional self-reported variables were then added to construct a full calibration model. Performance of the models was assessed by root-mean-square (RMS) differences between estimated and objectively measured values. Models developed on baseline data were validated using the follow-up datasets.

Results: Uncalibrated self-reported sitting ILR showed an RMS error of 0.767. Simple and full calibration models (incorporating body mass index, office type, and gender) reduced this error to 0.422 (55%) and 0.398 (52%), respectively. In the validations, model performance decreased to 57%/62% (simple models) and 57%/62% (full models) for the two follow-up data sets, respectively.

Conclusions: Calibration adjusting for errors in self-reported sitting led to substantially more correct estimates of "true" sitting than uncalibrated self-reports. Validation indicated that model performance would change somewhat in new datasets and that full models perform no better than simple models, but calibration remained effective.

Keywords
calibration, calibration model, compositional data analysis, occupational health, sedentary behavior
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-28757 (URN)10.5271/sjweh.3827 (DOI)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Available from: 2018-12-04 Created: 2018-12-04 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Mathiassen, S. E., Bolin, M., Olofsdotter, G. & Johansson, E. (2019). Equal health at work? Protocol for an observational study of work organisation, workload and musculoskeletal complaints among women and men in grocery retail. BMJ Open
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Equal health at work? Protocol for an observational study of work organisation, workload and musculoskeletal complaints among women and men in grocery retail
2019 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Keywords
Musculoskeletal, Occupation, Tasks, Work environment
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29459 (URN)
Available from: 2019-04-12 Created: 2019-04-12 Last updated: 2019-09-26Bibliographically approved
Mathiassen, S. E., Johansson, E., Bolin, M. & Olofsdotter, G. (2019). Jämställd arbetshälsa? Genus, arbetsorganisation och fysisk belastning inom detaljhandeln. In: Arbetsmiljö och ohälsa i ett genusperspektiv: Uppdragsforskning med relevans för tillsynsverksamheten (pp. 22-42). Stockholm: Arbetsmiljöverket
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Jämställd arbetshälsa? Genus, arbetsorganisation och fysisk belastning inom detaljhandeln
2019 (Swedish)In: Arbetsmiljö och ohälsa i ett genusperspektiv: Uppdragsforskning med relevans för tillsynsverksamheten, Stockholm: Arbetsmiljöverket , 2019, p. 22-42Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Arbetsmiljöverket, 2019
Series
Arbetsmiljöverket rapport, ISSN 1650-3717 ; 2019:7
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30683 (URN)
Note

Kapitel i rapport

Available from: 2019-09-23 Created: 2019-09-23 Last updated: 2019-10-24Bibliographically approved
Projects
Forte-centre Working Life: The Body at Work - from problem to potential [2009-01761_Forte]; University of Gävle; Publications
Hallman, D., Holtermann, A., Dencker-Larsen, S., Birk Jorgensen, M. & Nørregaard Rasmussen, C. (2019). Are trajectories of neck-shoulder pain associated with sick leave and work ability in workers? A 1-year prospective study. BMJ Open, 9(e022006)Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E., van der Beek, A., Jackson, J. & Coenen, P. (2019). Calibration of self-reported time spent sitting, standing and walking among office workers: a compositional data analysis. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(17), Article ID 3111. Jackson, J., Srinivasan, D. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2019). Consistent individual motor variability traits demonstrated by females performing a long-cycle assembly task under conditions differing in temporal organisation. Applied ErgonomicsDomkin, D., Forsman, M. & Richter, H. O. (2019). Effect of ciliary-muscle contraction force on trapezius muscle activity during computer mouse work. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 119(2), 389-397Bohman, T., Bottai, M. & Björklund, M. (2019). Predictive models for short-term and long-term improvement in women under physiotherapy for chronic disabling neck pain: a longitudinal cohort study. BMJ Open, 9(4), Article ID e024557. Holtermann, A., Mathiassen, S. E. & Straker, L. (2019). Promoting health and physical capacity during productive work: the Goldilocks Principle. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 45(1), 90-97Hallman, D., Holtermann, A., Björklund, M., Gupta, N. & Nørregaard Rasmussen, C. D. (2019). Sick leave due to musculoskeletal pain : determinants of distinct trajectories over 1 year. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 92(8), 1099-1108Gupta, N., Heiden, M., Mathiassen, S. E. & Holtermann, A. (2018). Is self-reported time spent sedentary and in physical activity differentially biased by age, gender, body mass index and low-back pain?. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 44(2), 163-170Richter, H., Forsman, M., Elcadi, G. H., Brautaset, R., Marsh, J. E. & Zetterberg, C. (2018). Prefrontal cortex activity evoked by convergence load under conflicting stimulus-to-accommodation and stimulus-to-vergence eye-movements measured by NIRS: Prefrontal cortex oxygenation and visual fatigue. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 12, Article ID 298. Trask, C., Mathiassen, S. E., Rostami, M. & Heiden, M. (2017). Observer variability in posture assessment from video recordings: the effect of partly visible periods. Applied Ergonomics, 60, 275-281
FIIP: Motor Variability in Occupational Work: Determinants & Physiological effects [2011-00075_Forte]; University of GävleEffekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor [TRV 2015/43010]; University of Gävle; Publications
Haapakangas, A., Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E. & Jahncke, H. (2019). The effects of moving into an activity-based office on communication, social relations and work demands – A controlled intervention with repeated follow-up. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 66, Article ID 101341. Haapakangas, A., Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E. & Jahncke, H. (2018). Self-rated productivity and employee well-being in activity-based offices: the role of environmental perceptions and workspace use. Building and Environment, 145, 115-124Jahncke, H., Persson, L. & Hallman, D. (2017). Aktivitetsbaserade arbetsplatser: Koncentration, stillasittande och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor: Kartläggning år 2015-2017. Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor A: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor B: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor C: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor D: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor E: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i Gävle
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