hig.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 175) Show all publications
Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E., Bjärntoft, S., Jahncke, H., Hartig, T. & Hallman, D. (2023). A Work Time Control Tradeoff in Flexible Work: Competitive Pathways to Need for Recovery. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 20(1), Article ID 691.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Work Time Control Tradeoff in Flexible Work: Competitive Pathways to Need for Recovery
Show others...
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 691Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Work time control may offer opportunities, but also implies risks for employee recovery, influenced by increased work-related ICT use and overtime work. However, this risk–opportunity tradeoff remains understudied. This study aimed to test two different models of associations between work time control, work-related ICT use, overtime work, and the need for recovery. These models were constructed based on data on office workers with flexible work arrangements. Cross-sectional data were obtained with questionnaires (n = 2582) from employees in a Swedish multi-site organization. Regression models treated the three determinants of the need for recovery either as independent, or as linked in a causal sequence. The test of independent determinants confirmed that more work time control was associated with less need for recovery, whereas more ICT use and overtime work were associated with a higher need for recovery. In a test of serial mediation, more work time control contributed to a greater need for recovery through more ICT use and then more overtime work. Work time control also had a competitive, indirect effect through a negative association with overtime work. Our results suggest that work time control is beneficial for employee recovery, but may for some be associated with more work-related ICT use after regular working hours, thus increasing recovery needs. Policies that support work time control can promote recovery, but employers must attend to the risk of excessive use of ICT outside of regular working hours.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
occupational health, job autonomy, digitalization, working conditions, working times
National Category
Work Sciences
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work, Flexibelt arbete; Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40639 (URN)10.3390/ijerph20010691 (DOI)000909151200001 ()36613009 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85145979290 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009–1761Swedish Transport Administration, 2015/92392
Available from: 2022-12-30 Created: 2022-12-30 Last updated: 2023-01-26Bibliographically approved
Svensson, S., Mathiassen, S. E., Hallman, D., Heiden, M. & Bergström, G. (2023). Associations between telework experience and psychosocial working conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic: A cross-sectional analysis among white-collar workers in Sweden. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 65(2), e74-e82
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between telework experience and psychosocial working conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic: A cross-sectional analysis among white-collar workers in Sweden
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 65, no 2, p. e74-e82Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To determine to what extent pre-COVID-19 experience of telework was associated with perceived psychosocial working conditions (PWC; job demands, social support and influence at work) during the COVID-19 pandemic among white-collar workers in Sweden, and to determine to what extent the association depends on demographic factors, organizational tenure, and amount of computer use.

Methods: Cross-sectional questionnaire data from 603 white-collar workers were collected October-December 2020 in an industrial company.

Results: In general, telework experience was not significantly associated with PWC. Women who began teleworking due to COVID-19 reported more job demands than women not teleworking. For those who began teleworking due to COVID-19, managerial support increased with age.

Conclusion: In general, telework experience was not associated with PWC, but telework due to COVID-19 may have influenced PWC differently depending on gender and age.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WoltersKluwer, 2023
Keywords
Telework; COVID-19; Job demands; Influence at work; Social support
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work; Health-Promoting Work, Flexibelt arbete
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-39433 (URN)10.1097/JOM.0000000000002758 (DOI)000925880100008 ()36729912 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85147457310 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-01257
Available from: 2022-07-04 Created: 2022-07-04 Last updated: 2023-05-02Bibliographically approved
Bjärntoft, S., Brulin, E., Rudolfsson, T., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2023). Effects of a controlled workplace intervention on work strategies, ICT use, productivity, and expectations of availability in employees with flexible work arrangements.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of a controlled workplace intervention on work strategies, ICT use, productivity, and expectations of availability in employees with flexible work arrangements
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work, Flexibelt arbete; Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-41033 (URN)
Available from: 2023-02-07 Created: 2023-02-07 Last updated: 2023-02-10Bibliographically approved
Bjärntoft, S., Mathiassen, S. E., Brulin, E., Rudolfsson, T. & Hallman, D. (2023). Effects of a participative workplace intervention intended to change work strategies and expectations of availability among office-based employees with flexible work arrangements. IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of a participative workplace intervention intended to change work strategies and expectations of availability among office-based employees with flexible work arrangements
Show others...
2023 (English)In: IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors, ISSN 2472-5838Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

Background: Flexible work arrangements (FWA) are common, but knowledge on how to organize flexible work to reduce negative consequences and preserve positive aspects is currently sparse, which hampers organizational initiatives.  

Purpose: This study aimed at determining the extent to which work strategies, work-related ICT use outside regular working hours (i.e., use of laptop, tablet, or smartphone, to handle information and facilitate communication), productivity, expectations of availability, and clarity of expectations about availability, had changed among office-based employees with FWA two and four months after a participative two-step workplace intervention.

Methods: An intervention group (n=97) was compared to a control group working as usual (n=70). The intervention, initiated and approved by the top management of the organization, included individual education intended to change work strategies, and workshops developing common rules and routines for FWA within the work group.

Results: Participants were satisfied with the intervention and reported larger changes than the control group in work strategies. No statistically significant effects were, however, found on ICT use, productivity, or expectations of availability.

Conclusions: This participative workplace intervention was successful in changing employees work strategies but may not be effective in influencing ICT use outside regular working hours, productivity, expectations of availability, and clarity of expectations about availability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
digitalization, work control, intervention, participative, work strategies
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work, Flexibelt arbete
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-43358 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Transport Administration, (Dnr. 2017/528)Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, (Forte Dnr. 2009-1761)
Available from: 2023-12-01 Created: 2023-12-01 Last updated: 2024-01-31Bibliographically approved
Mixter, S., Mathiassen, S. E., Jahncke, H., Hygge, S., Lyskov, E., Hallman, D. & Lewis, C. (2023). Effects of combining occupationally relevant physical and cognitive tasks. A systematic review. Annals of Work Exposures and Health, 67(3), 303-319
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of combining occupationally relevant physical and cognitive tasks. A systematic review
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Annals of Work Exposures and Health, ISSN 2398-7308 , E-ISSN 2398-7316 , Vol. 67, no 3, p. 303-319Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

Physical and cognitive tasks occur together in many occupations. Previous reviews of combined tasks have mainly focused on their effects in a sports context. This review investigated to which extent combinations (concurrent or alternating) of occupationally relevant physical and cognitive tasks influence responses reflecting biomechanical exposure, stress, fatigue, performance, and well-being.

Methods

We searched Scopus, Pubmed, Cinahl, and Psychinfo for controlled experiments investigating the effects of combinations of occupationally relevant physical and cognitive tasks in participants aged 18 to 70. In total, we identified 12 447 records. We added recent papers that had cited these studies (n = 573) to arrive at a total of 13 020 publications. After screening for relevance, 61 studies remained, of which 57 were classified to be of medium or high quality. Of the 57 studies, 51 addressed concurrent tasks, 5 alternating tasks, and 1 both concurrent and alternating tasks.

Results

Most studies of concurrent physical and cognitive tasks reported negative effects, if numerically small, on indicators of biomechanical exposure, fatigue, and performance, compared to a physical task alone. Results were mixed for stress indicators, and well-being was too little studied to justify any conclusions. Effects depended on the tasks, including their intensity and complexity. Alternating physical and cognitive tasks did not appear to influence outcomes much, compared to having passive breaks in-between physical tasks.

Conclusions

The reviewed evidence indicated that concurrent physical and cognitive work tasks have negative, yet small effects on biomechanical indicators, fatigue and performance, compared to performing the physical task alone, but only if the physical task is intense, and the cognitive task is complex. Alternating between physical and cognitive tasks may have similar effects as breaking up physical tasks by passive breaks, but studies were few. Future studies should address ecologically valid combinations of physical and cognitive tasks, in particular in controlled field studies devoted to the long-term effects of combined work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford Academic, 2023
Keywords
Physical work, Cognitive work, Fatigue, Stress, Performance
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work; Intelligent Industry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-38363 (URN)10.1093/annweh/wxac082 (DOI)000893669000001 ()36469430 (PubMedID)
Funder
AFA Insurance, 120223
Available from: 2022-03-31 Created: 2022-03-31 Last updated: 2023-03-16Bibliographically approved
Brulin, E., Bjärntoft, S., Bergström, G. & Hallman, D. (2023). Gendered associations of flexible work arrangement and perceived flexibility with work–life interference: a cross-sectional mediation analysis on office workers in Sweden. Social Indicators Research, 167, 571-588
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gendered associations of flexible work arrangement and perceived flexibility with work–life interference: a cross-sectional mediation analysis on office workers in Sweden
2023 (English)In: Social Indicators Research, ISSN 0303-8300, E-ISSN 1573-0921, Vol. 167, p. 571-588Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Flexible work arrangements (FWA) may be beneficial for increasing perceived flexibility (i.e. control over when, where and how to work) and reducing interference between work and private-life, but knowledge of gendered patterns of these relationships is sparse. Drawing on gender theory, the aim of this study was to conduct gender-differentiated analyses of the associations between FWA (non-regulated work or flex-time) and work–life interference using perceived flexibility as a mediator. Survey data were collected in 2016 from a sample of 2614 employees in the Swedish Transport Administration (response rate 67%). The sample included 39.6% women and 60.4% men, 71.7% had non-regulated work and 28.3% flex-time. Associations were determined using linear mixed models and mediation analysis. Results indicated a beneficial effect of non-regulated work (referencing flex-time) on work–life interference through an increase in perceived flexibility. The indirect effect of FWA was pronounced and statistically significant in the total sample, as well as in men and women. However, in men, non-regulated work was associated with a statistically significant increase in interference (competitive mediation). Gender did not interact significantly with work arrangement nor with perceived flexibility. In conclusion, the type of FWA can result in different perceptions of flexibility which in turn may affect experiences of work–life interference. Furthermore, it should be acknowledged that both FWAs and flexibility may be experienced differently for men and women regarding interference. Thus, employers seeking to reduce employee interference should consider gender norms and individual needs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Autonomy; Flexibility; Flexible work arrangement; Mediation; Men; Sustainable work; Women; Work–life interference
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-41767 (URN)10.1007/s11205-023-03113-w (DOI)000983919700003 ()2-s2.0-85158122348 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2018-01190Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-01257Swedish Transport Administration, 2015-92392
Available from: 2023-05-15 Created: 2023-05-15 Last updated: 2023-06-16Bibliographically approved
Wahlström, V., Januario, L., Mathiassen, S. E., Heiden, M. & Hallman, D. (2023). Hybrid office work in women and men: do directly measured physical behaviors differ between days working from home and days working at the office?. Annals of Work Exposures and Health, 67(9), 1043-1055
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hybrid office work in women and men: do directly measured physical behaviors differ between days working from home and days working at the office?
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Annals of Work Exposures and Health, ISSN 2398-7308 , E-ISSN 2398-7316 , Vol. 67, no 9, p. 1043-1055Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ObjectiveWe investigated and compared temporal sitting patterns among male and female hybrid office workers when working at the office (WAO), working from home (WFH), and for non-working days (NWD).

MethodsWe analyzed data collected in 2020 among 165 hybrid office workers, carrying thigh-worn accelerometers for 938 days in total. Day type (WAO, WFH, or NWD) and time in bed were identified using diaries. Time awake was exhaustively classified as non-sitting time and time sitting in short, moderate, and long bouts. Effects of day type and gender on the 24-h compositions of physical behaviors were analyzed using multilevel linear mixed models.

ResultsDuring workdays (both WAO and WFH), workers spent less time in bed and more time sitting, particularly in moderate and long bouts, than during NWD. Time in bed was longer when working from home than when working at the office, and more of the awake time was spent sitting. Differences between WAO and WFH in ratios between short, moderate, and long bouts of sitting were small and inconsistent. Men spent more time sitting than women, and more time in moderate and long sitting bouts relative to short bouts.

ConclusionsWhen working from home, hybrid office workers sat more during their hours awake compared to when working at the office. Sitting time was larger during working days than during non-working days and was higher in men than in women. These results may contribute to support organizational policies for hybrid work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford Academic, 2023
Keywords
covid-19 pandemic, compositional data analysis, remote work, sedentary, temporal patterns, time in bed
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work; Health-Promoting Work, Flexibelt arbete
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40561 (URN)10.1093/annweh/wxad057 (DOI)001078696200001 ()37795673 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85178498189 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-12-05 Created: 2022-12-05 Last updated: 2023-12-11Bibliographically approved
Wijk, K., Bergsten, E. L., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2023). Individual determinants of satisfaction with the work environment after relocation to activity-based workplaces: a prospective study. PLOS ONE, 18(3), Article ID e0281771.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individual determinants of satisfaction with the work environment after relocation to activity-based workplaces: a prospective study
2023 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 3, article id e0281771Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Relocation to activity-based workplaces influences work environment satisfaction, but individual determinants of changes in satisfaction remain unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine whether age, gender, education, occupational position, or office type before relocation can predict work environment satisfaction among employees and managers relocated to activity-based offices. Respondents (n=422) rated work environment satisfaction three months before and nine months after relocation. The findings indicate that, on average, satisfaction decreased after relocation, while for some workers it increased. Occupational position and office type at baseline predicted changes in satisfaction with the work environment; specifically, managers and those working in open-plan offices before relocation reported a smaller decline in satisfaction after relocation, compared to those relocating from private offices. Participants with no university education were more satisfied with the physical and psychosocial work environment in activity-based workplaces than those with a university degree. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PLOS, 2023
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40615 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0281771 (DOI)000967546000012 ()37000789 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85151350085 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Transport Administration
Available from: 2022-12-19 Created: 2022-12-19 Last updated: 2023-06-16Bibliographically approved
Heiden, M., Hallman, D., Svensson, M., Mathiassen, S. E., Svensson, S. & Bergström, G. (2023). Mismatch between actual and preferred extent of telework: cross-sectional and prospective associations with well-being and burnout. BMC Public Health, 23, Article ID 1736.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mismatch between actual and preferred extent of telework: cross-sectional and prospective associations with well-being and burnout
Show others...
2023 (English)In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 23, article id 1736Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: This study aimed to determine whether telework mismatch, i.e., lack of fit between actual and preferred extent of telework, is cross-sectionally and prospectively associated with well-being and burnout.

Methods: A questionnaire was sent to employees in a Swedish manufacturing company in November 2020 (baseline) and September 2021 (follow-up). It contained questions about well-being (WHO-5 Well-Being Index) and burnout (Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire III), as well as the preferred extent of telework and extent of telework performed. Telework mismatch was calculated as the difference between the actual and preferred extent of telework. Change in mismatch over time was categorized as 1) less mismatch at follow-up than at baseline, 2) more mismatch at follow-up, and 3) identical levels of mismatch at baseline and follow-up. Multivariate and univariate analyses of variance were used to determine the effects of mismatch and change in mismatch over time on baseline ratings and changes in ratings of well-being and burnout. All analyses were performed with and without adjustment for age, sex, marital status, children, type of employment, commuting time and extent of telework performed.

Results: The response rate was 39% at baseline (n=928, 67% men, mean(SD) age: 45(11) years) and 60% at follow-up (n=556, 64% men, mean(SD) age: 46(11) years). A cross-sectional association was found between telework mismatch and well-being, showing that employees who teleworked more than they would like reported worse well-being than those who teleworked less than they would like. No statistically significant association was found between telework mismatch and burnout. The ability of telework mismatch at baseline to predict changes in well-being or burnout over 10 months was small and non-significant. No association was found between change in telework mismatch over the 10-month period and corresponding changes in well-being or burnout.

Conclusion: Our results suggest that telework should be thoughtfully practiced in companies/organizations to avoid negative consequences for employees who already telework more than they prefer. Studies are needed to determine how long-term changes in match between preferred and actual extent of telework is associated with employee well-being, including how the association is modified by the nature of the job and the work environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
telecommuting, flexible work, person-environment fit, match, Sweden
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work, Flexibelt arbete
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40591 (URN)10.1186/s12889-023-16683-8 (DOI)001064421700007 ()37674141 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85169998556 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-01257AFA Insurance, 200244
Available from: 2022-12-08 Created: 2022-12-08 Last updated: 2023-10-05Bibliographically approved
Haapakangas, A., Hallman, D. & Bergsten, E. L. (2023). Office design and occupational health – has research been left behind?. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 49(1), 1-4
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Office design and occupational health – has research been left behind?
2023 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 1-4Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NOROSH, 2023
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work; Health-Promoting Work, Flexibelt arbete
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40709 (URN)10.5271/sjweh.4073 (DOI)000903928500001 ()2-s2.0-85145242327 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-06 Created: 2023-01-06 Last updated: 2023-01-19Bibliographically approved
Projects
Alternerande fysisk och kognitiv arbetsbelastning - effekter på prestation, trötthet och återhämtning [120223]; University of Gävle; Publications
Mixter, S. (2021). Combining cognitive and physical work tasks: Short-term effects on fatigue, stress, performance and recovery. (Doctoral dissertation). Gävle: Gävle University PressJahncke, H., Hygge, S., Mathiassen, S. E., Hallman, D., Mixter, S. & Lyskov, E. (2017). Variation at work: alternations between physically and mentally demanding tasks in blue-collar occupations. Ergonomics, 60(9), 1218-1227Jahncke, H., Hygge, S., Mathiassen, S. E., Hallman, D., Mixter, S. & Lyskov, E. (2016). A cross-sectional study of alternations between physical and mental tasks. In: : . Paper presented at Ninth International Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders (PREMUS), June 20-23, 2016, Toronto, Canada. Mixter, S., Mathiassen, S. E., Jahncke, H., Hallman, D. & Lindfors, P. (2016). Does the difficulty of a memory task interspersed between bouts of repetitive work influence recovery?. In: : . Paper presented at Ninth International Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders (PREMUS), Toronto, June 20-23, 2016 (pp. 398). Mixter, S., Mathiassen, S. E., Jahncke, H., Hygge, S., Lyskov, E., Hallman, D. & Lewis, C. Effects of combining physical and cognitive work tasks - a systematic review.
Betydelsen av psykosociala förhållanden i arbetsmiljön för fysisk belastning, smärta och sjukfrånvaro i äldreomsorgen [180076]; University of Gävle; Publications
Januario, L., Mathiassen, S. E., Holtermann, A., Bergström, G., Stevens, M. L., Rugulies, R. & Hallman, D. (2023). Ward-level leadership quality and prospective low-back pain of eldercare workers – do resident handlings mediate the association?. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 96, 1049-1059
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2741-1868

Search in DiVA

Show all publications