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Mixter, S., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2019). Alternations between physical and cognitive tasks in repetitive work – Effect of cognitive task difficulty on fatigue development in women. Ergonomics, 62(8), 1008-1022
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alternations between physical and cognitive tasks in repetitive work – Effect of cognitive task difficulty on fatigue development in women
2019 (English)In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 62, no 8, p. 1008-1022Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In a context of job rotation, this study determined the extent to which the difficulty of a cognitive task (CT) interspersed between bouts of repetitive, low-intensity work (pipetting) influences recovery from fatigue. Fifteen participants performed three experimental sessions, each comprising 10 repeats of a 7 min + 3 min combination of pipetting and CT. The CT was easy, moderate or hard. Surface electromyography (EMG amplitude of the forearm extensor and trapezius muscles) and self-reports was used to assess fatigability. Perceived fatigue and trapezius EMG amplitude increased during sessions. CT difficulty influenced fatigue development only little, besides forearm extensor EMG increasing more in CT3 than in CT1 and CT2. During CT bouts, fatigability recovered, and to a similar extent irrespective of CT. Thus, CT difficulty influenced recovery of perceived as well as performance fatigability to a minor extent, and may not be a critical issue in job rotation comprising alternating physical and cognitive tasks.

Keywords
Repetitive work, fatigue, recovery, physical load, mental load, variation
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26536 (URN)10.1080/00140139.2019.1614229 (DOI)000469647700001 ()31056015 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065848351 (Scopus ID)
Funder
AFA Insurance, 120223
Available from: 2018-05-03 Created: 2018-05-03 Last updated: 2019-08-19Bibliographically approved
Hallman, D., Holtermann, A., Dencker-Larsen, S., Birk Jorgensen, M. & Nørregaard Rasmussen, C. (2019). Are trajectories of neck-shoulder pain associated with sick leave and work ability in workers? A 1-year prospective study. BMJ Open, 9(e022006)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are trajectories of neck-shoulder pain associated with sick leave and work ability in workers? A 1-year prospective study
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2019 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no e022006Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ObjectivesThe study aimed to determine the extent to which latent trajectories of neck–shoulder pain (NSP) are associated with self-reported sick leave and work ability based on frequent repeated measures over 1 year in an occupational population.

MethodsThis longitudinal study included 748 Danish workers (blue-collar, n=620; white collar, n=128). A questionnaire was administered to collect data on personal and occupational factors at baseline. Text messages were used for repeated measurements of NSP intensity (scale 0–10) over 1 year (14 waves in total). Simultaneously, selfreported sick leave (days/month) due to pain was assessed at 4-week intervals, while work ability (scale 0–10) was assessed using a single item (work ability index) at 12-week intervals over the year. Trajectories of NSP, distinguished by latent class growth analysis, were usedas predictors of sick leave and work ability in generalised estimation equations with multiple adjustments.

ResultsSick leave increased and work ability decreased across all NSP trajectory classes (low, moderate, strong fluctuating and severe persistent pain intensity). In the adjusted model, the estimated number of days on sickleave was 1.5 days/month for severe persistent NSP compared with 0.1 days/month for low NSP (relativ risk=13.8, 95% CI 6.7 to 28.5). Similarly, work ability decreased markedly for severe persistent NSP (OR=12.9,95% CI 8.5 to 19.7; median 7.1) compared with low NSP (median 9.5).

ConclusionSevere persistent NSP was associatedwith sick leave and poor work ability over 1 year amongworkers. Preventive strategies aiming at reducing severepersistent NSP among working populations are needed.

National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25568 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2018-022006 (DOI)
Projects
PAINclass
Available from: 2017-11-22 Created: 2017-11-22 Last updated: 2019-03-25Bibliographically approved
Johansson, E., Mathiassen, S. E., Lund Rasmussen, C., Lyskov, E. & Hallman, D. (2019). Compositional analysis of sedentary behavior and physical activity during work and leisure among male and female office workers. In: : . Paper presented at 6th International Conference on Ambulatory Monitoring of Physical Activity and Movement (ICAMPAM), 26-28 June 2019, Maastricht, The Netherlands. , Article ID 1-45.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Compositional analysis of sedentary behavior and physical activity during work and leisure among male and female office workers
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2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Objective: To determine the extent to which male and female office workers differ in their time-use composition of sitting behaviors (SB) and physical activity (PA) during work and leisure.

Methods: SB and PA was measured using thigh-worn accelerometers for up to 8 full days in 77 male and 104 female office workers. Daily time-use compositions during work and leisure were described in four exhaustive categories, i.e. sitting in short (<30  min) and long (≥30 min) bouts, standing, and active behaviors. Following a compositional data analysis procedure, isometric log-ratios (ilr) were calculated to express time in sitting relative to non-sitting, short relative to long sitting bouts, and standing relative to active behaviors. Differences between sexes (men and women) and domains (work and leisure) were examined on the basis of these ilrs using ANOVA.

Results: At work, time spent sitting in short bouts, long bouts, standing, and active was, on average, 34%, 36%, 22% and 8% among men and 31%, 37%, 24% and 8% among women. Corresponding proportions during leisure were 34%, 25%, 28% and 13% among men and 29%, 28%, 31% and 12% among women. Time spent sitting relative to non-sitting differed significantly between work and leisure (ilr sitting-vs-non-sitting, partial eta squared=0.09, p<0.01). During leisure, men used proportionally more time than women in short sitting bouts (ilr short-vs-long, partial eta squared=0.06, p<0.01) and spent more time in active behaviors relative to standing (ilr standing-vs-active, partial eta squared=0.04, p<0.01). No significant sex differences were observed during work (p>0.05).

Conclusions:  The leisure behavior observed among men is probably more beneficial for health than that observed for women. However, both men and women spent a major proportion of their time sitting, both at and outside their office work, and they were, in general, only little active. Thus, both men and women could benefit from interventions to reduce SB and increase PA both at work and during leisure.

National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30450 (URN)
Conference
6th International Conference on Ambulatory Monitoring of Physical Activity and Movement (ICAMPAM), 26-28 June 2019, Maastricht, The Netherlands
Note

ICAMPAM 2019 Poster abstracts: https://ismpb.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/ICAMPAM2019PosterAbstracts.pdf

Available from: 2019-07-29 Created: 2019-07-29 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved
Coenen, P., Mathiassen, S. E., van der Beek, A. & Hallman, D. (2019). Correction of bias in self-reported sitting time among office workers – a study based on compositional data analysis. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correction of bias in self-reported sitting time among office workers – a study based on compositional data analysis
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Objective: Emerging evidence suggests that excessive sitting has negative health effects. However, this evidence largely relies on research using self-reported sitting time, which is known to be biased. To correct this bias, we aimed at developing a calibration model estimating "true" sitting from self-reported sitting.

Methods: Occupational sitting time was estimated by self-reports (the International Physical Activity Questionnaire) and objective measurements (thigh-worn accelerometer) among 99 Swedish office workers at a governmental agency, at baseline and 3 and 12 months afterwards. Following compositional data analysis procedures, both sitting estimates were transformed into isometric log-ratios (ILR). This effectively addresses that times spent in various activities are inherently dependent and can be presented as values of only 0−100%. Linear regression was used to develop a simple calibration model estimating objectively measured "true" sitting ILR (dependent variable) from self-reported sitting ILR (independent variable). Additional self-reported variables were then added to construct a full calibration model. Performance of the models was assessed by root-mean-square (RMS) differences between estimated and objectively measured values. Models developed on baseline data were validated using the follow-up datasets.

Results: Uncalibrated self-reported sitting ILR showed an RMS error of 0.767. Simple and full calibration models (incorporating body mass index, office type, and gender) reduced this error to 0.422 (55%) and 0.398 (52%), respectively. In the validations, model performance decreased to 57%/62% (simple models) and 57%/62% (full models) for the two follow-up data sets, respectively.

Conclusions: Calibration adjusting for errors in self-reported sitting led to substantially more correct estimates of "true" sitting than uncalibrated self-reports. Validation indicated that model performance would change somewhat in new datasets and that full models perform no better than simple models, but calibration remained effective.

Keywords
calibration, calibration model, compositional data analysis, occupational health, sedentary behavior
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-28757 (URN)10.5271/sjweh.3827 (DOI)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Available from: 2018-12-04 Created: 2018-12-04 Last updated: 2019-06-26Bibliographically approved
Bergsten, E. L., Haapakangas, A., Larsson, J., Jahncke, H. & Hallman, D. (2019). Effects of relocation to activity-based workplaces on perceived productivity: importance of change-oriented leadership.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of relocation to activity-based workplaces on perceived productivity: importance of change-oriented leadership
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2019 (English)In: Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30121 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Transport Administration, 2015/118
Available from: 2019-06-20 Created: 2019-06-20 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Hallman, D., Niklas, K., Jensen, M. T., Gupta, N., Birk Jørgensen, M. & Holtermann, A. (2019). Objectively measured sitting and standing in workers: Cross-sectional relationship with autonomic cardiac modulation. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(4), Article ID 650.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Objectively measured sitting and standing in workers: Cross-sectional relationship with autonomic cardiac modulation
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 4, article id 650Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Excessive sitting and standing are proposed risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), possibly due to autonomic imbalance. This study examines the association of objectively measured sitting and standing with nocturnal autonomic cardiac modulation. The cross-sectional study examined 490 blue-collar workers in three Danish occupational sectors. Sitting and standing during work and leisure were assessed during 1–5 days using accelerometers. Heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) were obtained during nocturnal sleep as markers of resting autonomic modulation. The associations of sitting and standing still (h/day) with HR and HRV were assessed with linear regression models, adjusted for age, gender, body mass index, smoking, and physical activity. More sitting time during leisure was associated with elevated HR (p = 0.02), and showed a trend towards reduced HRV. More standing time at work was associated with lower HR (p = 0.02), and with increased parasympathetic indices of HRV (root mean squared successive differences of R-R intervals p = 0.05; high-frequency power p = 0.07). These findings, while cross-sectional and restricted to blue-collar workers, suggest that sitting at leisure is detrimental to autonomic cardiac modulation, but standing at work is beneficial. However, the small effect size is likely insufficient to mitigate the previously shown detrimental effects of prolonged standing on CVD.

Keywords
age; accelerometer; cardiovascular disease; heart rate variability; occupational health; physical activity
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29312 (URN)10.3390/ijerph16040650 (DOI)000460804900129 ()2-s2.0-85062385075 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding:

Danish Work Environment Research Fund Grant no: 11-2017-03 

Available from: 2019-02-19 Created: 2019-02-19 Last updated: 2019-08-13Bibliographically approved
Bjärntoft, S., Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E., Larsson, J. & Jahncke, H. (2019). Occupational and Individual Determinants of Work-life Balance among Office Workers with Flexible Work Arrangements.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupational and Individual Determinants of Work-life Balance among Office Workers with Flexible Work Arrangements
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2019 (English)In: Article in journal (Other academic) Submitted
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30408 (URN)
Available from: 2019-07-05 Created: 2019-07-05 Last updated: 2019-08-07Bibliographically approved
Gupta, N., Hallman, D., Dumuid, D., Vij, A., Lund Rasmussen, C., Birk Jørgensen, M., . . . Holtermann, A. (2019). Physical-behavior profiles and aerobic capacity: A latent profile analysis of 24-hour time-use composition among Danish workers. In: ICAMPAM 2019: Oral Abstracts. Paper presented at ICAMPAM, June 26-28, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Maastricht: ICAMPAM, Article ID O.11.4.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical-behavior profiles and aerobic capacity: A latent profile analysis of 24-hour time-use composition among Danish workers
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2019 (English)In: ICAMPAM 2019: Oral Abstracts, Maastricht: ICAMPAM , 2019, article id O.11.4Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction Obtaining a balance between exercise and recovery is an established approach in Exercise Science to improve aerobic capacity. However, it is unknown how different 24-h time-use profiles depicting a balance between physical behaviors (i.e. physical activities, sedentary behavior and sleep) across main domains of the day are associated with aerobic capacity. We aimed to identify such 'physical-behavior (PB) profiles' and to investigate their association with aerobic capacity. Methods Workers (n=807) participated in thigh-accelerometry to determine 24-h time-use composition of physical activity, sedentary and standing during work and leisure, as well as time in bed. Åstrand submaximal cycle ergometer test was used to estimate aerobic capacity. The PB profiles were determined using latent profile analysis of isometric log-ratios representing the 24-hour composition. Linear models were applied to determine the cross-sectional association between physical-behavior profiles and aerobic capacity. Results Four PB profiles were identified that were labeled based on animal traits; Chimpanzees (n=226), Lions (n=179), Ants (n=244), and Koalas (n=158). Compared to Chimpanzees (at work, in mins; sedentary=197, standing=145, physical activity=117; and at leisure in mins; physical activity=114, standing=121, time in bed= 440); Lions were more active at work, sedentary at leisure and spent more time in bed; Ants had more physical activity at work and similar physical activity and time in bed at leisure; Koalas were more sedentary at work and leisure and spent more time in bed. Compared to Chimpanzees, Koalas had lower aerobic capacity (mlO2/kg/min): -3.7 (95%CI -6.0,-1.5), followed by Lions -3.6 (-5.5,-1.7) and Ants -1.8 (-3.7,- 0.1). Conclusions Physical-behavior profiles based on 24-h time-use composition are associated with aerobic capacity. Obtaining a balance between physical behaviors at work and leisure may be a promising approach for improving aerobic capacity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Maastricht: ICAMPAM, 2019
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30411 (URN)
Conference
ICAMPAM, June 26-28, Maastricht, The Netherlands
Available from: 2019-07-05 Created: 2019-07-05 Last updated: 2019-08-07Bibliographically approved
Hallman, D., Holtermann, A., Björklund, M., Gupta, N. & Nørregaard Rasmussen, C. D. (2019). Sick leave due to musculoskeletal pain : determinants of distinct trajectories over 1 year. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sick leave due to musculoskeletal pain : determinants of distinct trajectories over 1 year
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2019 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose

This study aimed to identify sub-groups of workers with different trajectories of sick leave due to musculoskeletalpain over 1 year, and to investigate the extent to which the identified trajectories are associated with personal, occupational,lifestyle, and pain-related factors at baseline.

Methods

Data on 981 blue- and white-collar workers were analyzed in the DPHACTO cohort (2012–2014). The numberof days on sick leave due to pain was reported using text messages at 4-week intervals across 1 year. Latent class growthanalysis was used to distinguish sub-groups with different trajectories of sick leave. A web-based questionnaire at baselinewas used to assess personal, occupational (physical and psychosocial), lifestyle, and pain-related factors. Multinomial regressionmodels were constructed to determine associations between baseline factors and trajectories of sick leave (referencingno sick leave), with adjustment for potential confounders.

Results

Four distinct sub-groups were identified, with trajectories of sick leave due to pain ranging from no sick leave(prevalence 76%; average 0.5 days/year) to some days and increasing sick leave due to pain over 1 year (2%; 89 days/year).The increasing trajectory of sick leave was associated with higher perceived physical exertion, more time in manual work,less social community and influence at work, less leisure-time physical activity, smoking, and more severe symptoms (e.g.,multisite pain, low back pain intensity, and pain interference).

Conclusions

We identified four distinct trajectories of sick leave due to musculoskeletal pain. The sub-group with increasingsick leave due to pain was associated with several modifiable physical and psychosocial factors at work and outside work,which may have implications for prevention.

Keywords
Longitudinal, Risk factors, Sickness absence, Workers
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29674 (URN)10.1007/s00420-019-01447-y (DOI)31165308 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85067077539 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-01761
Note

Danish Working Environment Research Fund Grant no. 01-2015-09

Available from: 2019-06-05 Created: 2019-06-05 Last updated: 2019-08-20Bibliographically approved
Mixter, S., Mathiassen, S. E., Lindfors, P., Dimberg, K., Jahncke, H., Lyskov, E. & Hallman, D. (2019). Stress-related responses to alternations between repetitive physical work and cognitive tasks of different difficulties. Applied Ergonomics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stress-related responses to alternations between repetitive physical work and cognitive tasks of different difficulties
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2019 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

This experimental study aimed to determine the extent to which a repetitive physical task alternatingwith a cognitive task (CT) influences stress responses and whether the CT difficulty is important. Fifteen women performed three sessions of 10 consecutive work bouts, each including a seven-minutere petitive physical task and a three-minute CT at either of three difficulty levels. Stress-related responses were assessed using heart rate variability, blood pressure, salivary alpha-amylase, salivary cortisol, perceived stress and cognitive performance.The alternating work did not result in any marked increase in perceived stress or changes in stressresponses. CT difficulty did not influence stress responses (all p>0.05), apart from alpha-amylase which was higher during the easiest CT (F= 5.34, p= 0.02). Thus, introducing cognitive work bouts into repetitive physical work did not result in increased levels of stress, suggesting this approach to be viable in job rotation.

Keywords
recovery, stress, mental task
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30459 (URN)
Funder
AFA Insurance, 120223
Available from: 2019-08-06 Created: 2019-08-06 Last updated: 2019-08-12
Projects
Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor [TRV 2015/43010]; University of Gävle; Publications
Haapakangas, A., Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E. & Jahncke, H. (2018). Self-rated productivity and employee well-being in activity-based offices: the role of environmental perceptions and workspace use. Building and Environment, 145, 115-124Jahncke, H., Persson, L. & Hallman, D. (2017). Aktivitetsbaserade arbetsplatser: Koncentration, stillasittande och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor: Kartläggning år 2015-2017. Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor A: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor B: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor C: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor D: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor E: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i Gävle
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2741-1868

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