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Publications (10 of 101) Show all publications
Haapakangas, A., Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E. & Jahncke, H. (2019). The effects of moving into an activity-based office on communication, social relations and work demands – A controlled intervention with repeated follow-up.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of moving into an activity-based office on communication, social relations and work demands – A controlled intervention with repeated follow-up
2019 (English)In: Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29117 (URN)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Available from: 2019-01-15 Created: 2019-01-15 Last updated: 2019-01-15
Gupta, N., Mathiassen, S. E., Mateu-Figueras, G., Heiden, M., Hallman, D., Birk Jørgensen, M. & Holtermann, A. (2018). A comparison of standard and compositional analysis in studies addressing group differences in sedentary behavior and physical activity. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 15(1), Article ID 53.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparison of standard and compositional analysis in studies addressing group differences in sedentary behavior and physical activity
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, ISSN 1479-5868, E-ISSN 1479-5868, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Data on time spent in physical activity, sedentary behavior and sleep during a day is compositional in nature, i.e. they add up to a constant value, typically 100% time. Compositional data have fundamentally different properties from unconstrained data in real space, and require other processing and analysis procedures, referred to as compositional data analysis (CoDA). Most physical activity and sedentary behavior studies, however, still apply analytical procedures adapted to data in real space, which can lead to misleading results. The present study describes a comparison of time spent sedentary and in physical activity between age groups and sexes, and investigates the extent to which results obtained by CoDA differ from those obtained using standard analytical procedures.

Methods. Time spent sedentary, standing, and in physical activity (walking/running/stair climbing/cycling) during work and leisure was determined for 1-4 days among 677 blue-collar workers using accelerometry. Differences between sexes and age groups were tested using MANOVA, using both a standard approach and a CoDA approach based on isometric log-ratio transformed data.  

Results. When determining differences between sexes in time used for different activities at work, the effect size using standard analysis (η2=0.045, p<0.001) was 15% smaller than that obtained with CoDA (η2=0.052, p<0.001), although both approaches suggested a statistically significant difference. When determining corresponding differences between age groups, CoDA resulted in a 60% larger, and significant, effect size (η2=0.012, p=0.02) than that obtained with the standard approach (η2=0.008, p=0.07). During leisure, results with standard (age; η2=0.007, p=0.09; sex; η2=0.052, p<0.001) and CoDA (age; η2=0.007, p=0.09; sex; η2=0.051, p<0.001) analyses were similar.

Conclusion. Results and, hence, inferences concerning differences by age and sex in time spent sedentary and in physical activity at work differed between CoDA and standard analysis. We encourage researchers to use CoDA in similar studies, in order to adequately account for the compositional nature of data on physical activity and sedentary behavior

Keywords
CoDA, accelerometry, MANOVA, isometric log-ratio, gender, age groups
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25483 (URN)10.1186/s12966-018-0685-1 (DOI)000435403500001 ()29903009 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85048626702 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Note

Funding agencies:

- Danish government

- Danish Work Environment Research Fund grant no: 20150017496/4

Available from: 2017-11-02 Created: 2017-11-02 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Mixter, S., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2018). Alternations between physical and cognitive tasks in repetitive work – Effect of cognitive task difficulty on fatigue development. Ergonomics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alternations between physical and cognitive tasks in repetitive work – Effect of cognitive task difficulty on fatigue development
2018 (English)In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

In a context of job rotation, the present study determined the extent to which the difficulty of a cognitive task (CT) interspersed between bouts of repetitive, low-force work influence recovery.

Fifteen female participants performed three experimental sessions with 10 repeats of a 7min+3min combination of physical and cognitive tasks (CT). The CT was either easy, moderate or hard. During sessions, muscle activity was recorded using surface electromyography, and participants rated fatigue and pain.

Muscle activity and ratings of perceived fatigue increased during work. Cognitive task difficulty influenced fatigue development marginally, apart from forearm extensor EMG increasing slower with the hard CT.  During the CT periods, EMG and perceived fatigue partly recovered, and to the same extent with all three CT difficulties.

In conclusion, CT difficulty had marginal effects on recovery from fatigue and may, thus, not be a critical issue in job rotation schemes with alternating physical and cognitive tasks.

Keywords
Repetitive work, fatigue, recovery, physical load, mental load, variation
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26536 (URN)
Funder
AFA Insurance, 120223
Available from: 2018-05-03 Created: 2018-05-03 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Mixter, S., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2018). Alternations between physical and mental tasks – a viable option for job rotation?. In: : . Paper presented at 20th Congress International Ergonomics Association, 26-30 August, 2018, Florens, Italy.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alternations between physical and mental tasks – a viable option for job rotation?
2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27878 (URN)
Conference
20th Congress International Ergonomics Association, 26-30 August, 2018, Florens, Italy
Funder
AFA Insurance
Available from: 2018-09-07 Created: 2018-09-07 Last updated: 2018-09-10Bibliographically approved
Locks, F., Gupta, N., Hallman, D., Birk Jørgensen, M. & Holtermann, A. (2018). Association between objectively measured static standing and low back pain - a cross-sectional study among blue-collar workers. Ergonomics, 61(9), 1196-1207
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between objectively measured static standing and low back pain - a cross-sectional study among blue-collar workers
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2018 (English)In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 61, no 9, p. 1196-1207Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aims to investigate the cross-sectional association between objectively measured total time and temporal patterns of static standing (short bouts: 0-5 min; moderate bouts: >5-10 min; and long bouts: >10 min) during work and leisure and low back pain (LBP) among 698 blue-collar workers. Workers reported LBP on a 0-10 scale. The association between time spent on static standing and LBP was tested with linear regression. A positive association with LBP intensity was found for long bouts of static standing (β = 0.27) during total day (work + leisure), and total static standing time at leisure (β = 0.12). No significant associations were found for static standing during work and LBP intensity. These findings indicate that particularly long bouts of static standing over the entire day contribute to LBP in blue-collar workers.

Keywords
Accelerometry; Body posture; Occupational health; Physical activity; Standing work
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23135 (URN)10.1080/00140139.2018.1455900 (DOI)000445304000004 ()29560812 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044766798 (Scopus ID)
Projects
SitNeck
Available from: 2016-12-22 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2018-10-15Bibliographically approved
Hallman, D. & Holtermann, A. (2018). Can the daily time-pattern differentiate the health effects of physical activity?. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 15(10 Suppl. 1), S3
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can the daily time-pattern differentiate the health effects of physical activity?
2018 (English)In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health, ISSN 1543-3080, E-ISSN 1543-5474, Vol. 15, no 10 Suppl. 1, p. S3-Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Human Kinetics, 2018
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-28660 (URN)000446516100012 ()
Available from: 2018-11-26 Created: 2018-11-26 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved
Coenen, P., Mathiassen, S. E., van der Beek, A. & Hallman, D. (2018). Correction of bias in self-reported sitting time among office workers – a study based on compositional data analysis. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correction of bias in self-reported sitting time among office workers – a study based on compositional data analysis
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990XArticle in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Keywords
sitting, sedentary behaviour, occupational, calibration, bias
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-28757 (URN)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Available from: 2018-12-04 Created: 2018-12-04 Last updated: 2018-12-06Bibliographically approved
Coenen, P., Korshøj, M., Hallman, D. M., Huysmans, M. A., van der Beek, A. J., Straker, L. M. & Holtermann, A. (2018). Differences in heart rate reserve of similar physical activities during work and in leisure time - A study among Danish blue-collar workers. Physiology and Behavior, 185, 45-51
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences in heart rate reserve of similar physical activities during work and in leisure time - A study among Danish blue-collar workers
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2018 (English)In: Physiology and Behavior, ISSN 0031-9384, E-ISSN 1873-507X, Vol. 185, p. 45-51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent studies suggest that while leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) promotes general health, engaging in occupational physical activity (OPA) may have negative health consequences. It has been hypothesized that the different health effects from OPA and LTPA can be explained by differences in physical activity (PA) intensity in these two domains. To assess the intensity of OPA and LTPA, we aimed to study the percentage heart rate reserve (%HRR) during similar types of OPA and LTPA during workdays. Data from the NOMAD study on Danish blue-collar workers (n=124) with objective measurements of PA (using accelerometers) and heart rate (using heart rate monitors) for 4 workdays were analysed. Activities of sitting, standing, moving, walking, and stair climbing were identified and %HRR in each of these activities was determined for work and leisure. %HRR was significantly higher during OPA than LTPA. These differences were more pronounced in men than in women. Although not statistically significant in the fully adjusted model, we found indications that these differences were more pronounced in those with low compared to high fitness. To our knowledge, this is the first study with objective measurements showing that %HRR is higher during the same gross-body postural activities when performed at work compared to leisure-time during workdays. This elevated intensity may help explaining the negative health consequences of engagement in high levels of OPA. Future guidelines should distinguish OPA from LTPA, possibly by advising workers to remain active during their leisure time, in particular when they are highly active at work.

Keywords
Accelerometry, Blue-collar workers, Heart rate reserve, Leisure-time physical activity, Occupational physical activity, Physical activity
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26048 (URN)10.1016/j.physbeh.2018.01.011 (DOI)000425573200007 ()29341873 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85041308506 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-22 Created: 2018-01-22 Last updated: 2018-12-11Bibliographically approved
Sato, T., Hallman, D., Kristiansen, J., Skotte, J. & Holtermann, A. (2018). Different autonomic responses to occupational and leisure time physical activities among blue-collar workers. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 91(3), 293-304
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Different autonomic responses to occupational and leisure time physical activities among blue-collar workers
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2018 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 91, no 3, p. 293-304Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE:

The differential effect of occupational and leisure time physical activity on cardiovascular health is termed the physical activity health paradox. Cardiac autonomic modulation could bring insights about the underlying mechanism behind this differential effect. The aim was to compare heart rate variability (HRV) during different activities (sitting, standing and moving) at work and leisure among blue-collar workers.

METHODS:

One hundred thirty-eight workers from the NOMAD cohort were included. Data from physical activity and HRV were obtained for 3-4 days using tri-axial accelerometers (Actigraph GT3X+) and a heart rate monitor (Actiheart). HRV indices were determined during sitting, standing and moving both at work and leisure. Linear mixed-models with two fixed factors (activities and domains) were applied to investigate differences in HRV indices adjusting for individual and occupational factors.

RESULTS:

The results showed significant effects of domain (p < 0.01), physical activity type (p < 0.01) and interaction between domain and activity type (p < 0.01) on HRV indices. Mean heart rate (IBI) and parasympathetic measures of HRV (RMSSD and HF) were lower for sitting (p < 0.01) and higher for moving (p < 0.01) during work compared with leisure, while no difference between domains was found for standing (p > 0.05). Sympathovagal balance (LF/HF) was higher during work for sitting and moving (p < 0.01), but showed no difference for standing (p = 0.62).

CONCLUSIONS:

Differences in cardiac autonomic modulation between work and leisure were found, indicating sympathetic predominance during work and parasympathetic predominance during leisure for sitting. Autonomic responses can be part of the mechanism that explains the differential effect of occupational and leisure time physical activity on health.

Keywords
Cardiovascular disease; Heart rate variability; Objective measurements; Occupational health
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25565 (URN)10.1007/s00420-017-1279-y (DOI)000427151700005 ()29177943 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85035141241 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency

- Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BAuA), Berlin, Germany 

- National Research Centre for the Working Environment (NRCWE), Copenhagen

- Denmark   Sao Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP), Sao Paulo, Brazil : Grant no: 2015/18310-1 

Available from: 2017-11-22 Created: 2017-11-22 Last updated: 2018-10-15Bibliographically approved
Bjärntoft, S., Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E., Larsson, J. & Jahncke, H. (2018). Flexible work: Occupational determinants of work-life balance. In: : . Paper presented at 20th Congress International Ergonomics Association, 26-30 August 2018, Florens, Italy.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Flexible work: Occupational determinants of work-life balance
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2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27880 (URN)
Conference
20th Congress International Ergonomics Association, 26-30 August 2018, Florens, Italy
Available from: 2018-09-10 Created: 2018-09-10 Last updated: 2018-09-11Bibliographically approved
Projects
Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor [TRV 2015/43010]; University of Gävle; Publications
Haapakangas, A., Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E. & Jahncke, H. (2018). Self-rated productivity and employee well-being in activity-based offices: the role of environmental perceptions and workspace use. Building and Environment, 145, 115-124Jahncke, H., Persson, L. & Hallman, D. (2017). Aktivitetsbaserade arbetsplatser: Koncentration, stillasittande och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor: Kartläggning år 2015-2017. Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor A: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor B: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor C: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor D: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor E: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i Gävle
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2741-1868

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