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Hallman, D., Holtermann, A., Dencker-Larsen, S., Birk Jorgensen, M. & Nørregaard Rasmussen, C. (2019). Are trajectories of neck-shoulder pain associated with sick leave and work ability in workers? A 1-year prospective study. BMJ Open, 9(e022006)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are trajectories of neck-shoulder pain associated with sick leave and work ability in workers? A 1-year prospective study
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2019 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no e022006Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ObjectivesThe study aimed to determine the extent to which latent trajectories of neck–shoulder pain (NSP) are associated with self-reported sick leave and work ability based on frequent repeated measures over 1 year in an occupational population.

MethodsThis longitudinal study included 748 Danish workers (blue-collar, n=620; white collar, n=128). A questionnaire was administered to collect data on personal and occupational factors at baseline. Text messages were used for repeated measurements of NSP intensity (scale 0–10) over 1 year (14 waves in total). Simultaneously, selfreported sick leave (days/month) due to pain was assessed at 4-week intervals, while work ability (scale 0–10) was assessed using a single item (work ability index) at 12-week intervals over the year. Trajectories of NSP, distinguished by latent class growth analysis, were usedas predictors of sick leave and work ability in generalised estimation equations with multiple adjustments.

ResultsSick leave increased and work ability decreased across all NSP trajectory classes (low, moderate, strong fluctuating and severe persistent pain intensity). In the adjusted model, the estimated number of days on sickleave was 1.5 days/month for severe persistent NSP compared with 0.1 days/month for low NSP (relativ risk=13.8, 95% CI 6.7 to 28.5). Similarly, work ability decreased markedly for severe persistent NSP (OR=12.9,95% CI 8.5 to 19.7; median 7.1) compared with low NSP (median 9.5).

ConclusionSevere persistent NSP was associatedwith sick leave and poor work ability over 1 year amongworkers. Preventive strategies aiming at reducing severepersistent NSP among working populations are needed.

National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25568 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2018-022006 (DOI)
Projects
PAINclass
Available from: 2017-11-22 Created: 2017-11-22 Last updated: 2019-03-25Bibliographically approved
Hallman, D., Niklas, K., Thorsten Jensen, M., Gupta, N., Birk Jørgensen, M. & Holtermann, A. (2019). Objectively measured sitting and standing in workers: Cross-sectional relationship with autonomic cardiac modulation. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(4), Article ID 650.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Objectively measured sitting and standing in workers: Cross-sectional relationship with autonomic cardiac modulation
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 4, article id 650Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Excessive sitting and standing are proposed risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), possibly due to autonomic imbalance. This study examines the association of objectively measured sitting and standing with nocturnal autonomic cardiac modulation. The cross-sectional study examined 490 blue-collar workers in three Danish occupational sectors. Sitting and standing during work and leisure were assessed during 1–5 days using accelerometers. Heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) were obtained during nocturnal sleep as markers of resting autonomic modulation. The associations of sitting and standing still (h/day) with HR and HRV were assessed with linear regression models, adjusted for age, gender, body mass index, smoking, and physical activity. More sitting time during leisure was associated with elevated HR (p = 0.02), and showed a trend towards reduced HRV. More standing time at work was associated with lower HR (p = 0.02), and with increased parasympathetic indices of HRV (root mean squared successive differences of R-R intervals p = 0.05; high-frequency power p = 0.07). These findings, while cross-sectional and restricted to blue-collar workers, suggest that sitting at leisure is detrimental to autonomic cardiac modulation, but standing at work is beneficial. However, the small effect size is likely insufficient to mitigate the previously shown detrimental effects of prolonged standing on CVD.

Keywords
age; accelerometer; cardiovascular disease; heart rate variability; occupational health; physical activity
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29312 (URN)10.3390/ijerph16040650 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-02-19 Created: 2019-02-19 Last updated: 2019-02-25Bibliographically approved
Picchiottino, M., Leboeuf-Yde, C., Gagey, O. & Hallman, D. (2019). The acute effects of joint manipulativetechniques on markers of autonomic nervous system activity: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized sham-controlled trials. Chiropractic and Manual Therapies, 27, Article ID 17.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The acute effects of joint manipulativetechniques on markers of autonomic nervous system activity: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized sham-controlled trials
2019 (English)In: Chiropractic and Manual Therapies, ISSN 2045-709X, E-ISSN 2045-709X, Vol. 27, article id 17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BackgroundThe autonomic nervous system (ANS) interests many chiropractors and manual therapists, because joint manipulative techniques (JMT), e.g. high velocity low amplitude (HVLA) manipulations and mobilizations, appear to produce acute changes in ANS mediated physiology. The complexity of this issue justifies a systematic critical literature review.

ObjectiveTo review the literature comparing the acute changes in markers of ANS activity between JMT applied on spinal or peripheral joints and a sham procedure in healthy or symptomatic subjects.

MethodWe searched PsycINFO, PEDro, PubMed, Cochrane library, EMBASE, and Medline up to December 2017. We updated the search with PubMed, Cochrane library, EMBASE, and Medline including July 2018. Inclusion criteria were: randomized sham-controlled trials assessing the effect of JMT on markers of ANS activity; manually applied JMT, regardless of technique, applied on either healthy or symptomatic humans; outcome measurements recorded at baseline and repeated during and/or after interventions. Selection of articles and data extraction were performed independently by two reviewers. The quality of studies was assessed using the Cochrane ‘risk of bias’ tool and a technical check-list. Results were reported narratively with some meta-analyses. The Cochrane GRADE approach was used to assess the certainty of evidence.

ResultsTwenty-nine of 2267 studies were included in the synthesis. Mobilizations (oscillatory technique) probably produce an immediate and short-term, bilateral increase in skin sympathetic nerve activity (reflected by an increase in skin conductance) regardless of the area treated (moderate-certainty evidence). It is uncertain whether the sympathetic arousal also explains an increase in respiratory rate (very low-certainty evidence). Our evaluation of the literature suggests that spinal sustained apophyseal glides (SNAGs) mobilization and HVLA manipulation of the spine may have no acute effect on the studied markers of ANS activity (very low- to low-certainty evidence).

ConclusionSome types of mobilizations probably produce an immediate and short-term, statistically significant increase in skin sympathetic nerve activity when compared to a sham procedure, whereas spinal SNAGs and spinal HVLA techniques may have no acute effect on the studied markers of ANS activity. No region-specific results were noted. The literature suffers from several shortcomings, for which reason we strongly suggest further research.

Abstract [fr]

IntroductionLe système nerveux autonome (SNA) intéresse de nombreux chiropracteurs et thérapeutes manuels car les techniques de manipulation articulaire, e.g. mobilisations ou manipulations de haute vélocité et faible amplitude (HVLA) semblent produire des changements immédiats de l’activité du SNA. La complexité de la littérature sur le sujet justifie une revue critique de la littérature.

ObjectifExaminer la littérature comparant les changements immédiats d’activité du SNA entre i) différentes techniques de manipulation articulaire appliquées sur le rachis ou les articulations périphériques et ii) une procédure placebo chez des sujets sains ou pathologiques.

MéthodeNous avons cherché sur PsycINFO, PEDro jusqu’en décembre 2017 et sur PubMed, Cochrane library, EMBASE, Medline jusqu’en juillet 2018. Les critères d’inclusion étaient: essais randomisés contrôlés par un placebo évaluant l’effet d’une technique de manipulation articulaire sur l’activité du SNA, sans restriction concernant la technique ou la population, mesures de l’activité du SNA réalisées avant, pendant et/ou après l’intervention. La qualité des études était évaluée avec la grille de risque de biais de Cochrane et avec une grille d’évaluation technique. La sélection des études et l’extraction des données étaient effectuées indépendamment par deux chercheurs. Les résultats ont été rapportés narrativement, parfois avec des méta-analyses, en évaluant la certitude du niveau de preuve avec l’approche GRADE de Cochrane.

RésultatsNous avons inclus 29 études sur les 2267 trouvées. Il y a des preuves de certitude modérée que les mobilisations (avec une technique d’oscillation) produisent une augmentation bilatérale, immédiate et à court terme de l’activité sympathique cutanée, indépendamment de la région mobilisée. Nous ne savons pas si l’excitation sympathique explique une augmentation de la fréquence respiratoire. Il y a des preuves de faible certitude que la manipulation spinale (HVLA) ainsi qu’une autre technique de mobilisation spinale n’ont pas d’effet sur l’activité autonome mesurée.

ConclusionCertaines techniques de mobilisation articulaire produisent probablement une augmentation (statistiquement significative) immédiate et à court terme de l’activité sympathique cutanée comparées à une procédure placebo. Les manipulations spinales (HVLA) pourraient ne pas avoir d’effet immédiat sur l’activité autonome étudiée. Nous n’avons pas remarqué d’effet spécifique en fonction de la zone du traitement. Cette littérature montre des lacunes. Pour cette raison, nous suggérons (vivement) de nouvelles études.

Keywords
Autonomic nervous system, Sympathetic nervous system, Parasympathetic nervous system, High velocity low amplitude manipulation, Mobilization, Joint manipulative techniques, Systematic review, Système nerveux autonome, Système nerveux sympathique, Système nerveux parasympathique, Manipulation de haute vélocité et de faible amplitude, Mobilisation, Technique de manipulation articulaire, Revue systématique
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29313 (URN)10.1186/s12998-019-0235-1 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-02-19 Created: 2019-02-19 Last updated: 2019-03-12Bibliographically approved
Haapakangas, A., Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E. & Jahncke, H. (2019). The effects of moving into an activity-based office on communication, social relations and work demands – A controlled intervention with repeated follow-up.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of moving into an activity-based office on communication, social relations and work demands – A controlled intervention with repeated follow-up
2019 (English)In: Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29117 (URN)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Available from: 2019-01-15 Created: 2019-01-15 Last updated: 2019-02-13Bibliographically approved
Gupta, N., Mathiassen, S. E., Mateu-Figueras, G., Heiden, M., Hallman, D., Birk Jørgensen, M. & Holtermann, A. (2018). A comparison of standard and compositional data analysis in studies addressing group differences in sedentary behavior and physical activity. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 15(1), Article ID 53.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparison of standard and compositional data analysis in studies addressing group differences in sedentary behavior and physical activity
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, ISSN 1479-5868, E-ISSN 1479-5868, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Data on time spent in physical activity, sedentary behavior and sleep during a day is compositional in nature, i.e. they add up to a constant value, typically 100% time. Compositional data have fundamentally different properties from unconstrained data in real space, and require other processing and analysis procedures, referred to as compositional data analysis (CoDA). Most physical activity and sedentary behavior studies, however, still apply analytical procedures adapted to data in real space, which can lead to misleading results. The present study describes a comparison of time spent sedentary and in physical activity between age groups and sexes, and investigates the extent to which results obtained by CoDA differ from those obtained using standard analytical procedures.

Methods. Time spent sedentary, standing, and in physical activity (walking/running/stair climbing/cycling) during work and leisure was determined for 1-4 days among 677 blue-collar workers using accelerometry. Differences between sexes and age groups were tested using MANOVA, using both a standard approach and a CoDA approach based on isometric log-ratio transformed data.  

Results. When determining differences between sexes in time used for different activities at work, the effect size using standard analysis (η2=0.045, p<0.001) was 15% smaller than that obtained with CoDA (η2=0.052, p<0.001), although both approaches suggested a statistically significant difference. When determining corresponding differences between age groups, CoDA resulted in a 60% larger, and significant, effect size (η2=0.012, p=0.02) than that obtained with the standard approach (η2=0.008, p=0.07). During leisure, results with standard (age; η2=0.007, p=0.09; sex; η2=0.052, p<0.001) and CoDA (age; η2=0.007, p=0.09; sex; η2=0.051, p<0.001) analyses were similar.

Conclusion. Results and, hence, inferences concerning differences by age and sex in time spent sedentary and in physical activity at work differed between CoDA and standard analysis. We encourage researchers to use CoDA in similar studies, in order to adequately account for the compositional nature of data on physical activity and sedentary behavior

Keywords
CoDA, accelerometry, MANOVA, isometric log-ratio, gender, age groups
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25483 (URN)10.1186/s12966-018-0685-1 (DOI)000435403500001 ()29903009 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85048626702 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Note

Funding agencies:

- Danish government

- Danish Work Environment Research Fund grant no: 20150017496/4

Available from: 2017-11-02 Created: 2017-11-02 Last updated: 2019-03-12Bibliographically approved
Mixter, S., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2018). Alternations between physical and cognitive tasks in repetitive work – Effect of cognitive task difficulty on fatigue development. Ergonomics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alternations between physical and cognitive tasks in repetitive work – Effect of cognitive task difficulty on fatigue development
2018 (English)In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

In a context of job rotation, the present study determined the extent to which the difficulty of a cognitive task (CT) interspersed between bouts of repetitive, low-force work influence recovery.

Fifteen female participants performed three experimental sessions with 10 repeats of a 7min+3min combination of physical and cognitive tasks (CT). The CT was either easy, moderate or hard. During sessions, muscle activity was recorded using surface electromyography, and participants rated fatigue and pain.

Muscle activity and ratings of perceived fatigue increased during work. Cognitive task difficulty influenced fatigue development marginally, apart from forearm extensor EMG increasing slower with the hard CT.  During the CT periods, EMG and perceived fatigue partly recovered, and to the same extent with all three CT difficulties.

In conclusion, CT difficulty had marginal effects on recovery from fatigue and may, thus, not be a critical issue in job rotation schemes with alternating physical and cognitive tasks.

Keywords
Repetitive work, fatigue, recovery, physical load, mental load, variation
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26536 (URN)
Funder
AFA Insurance, 120223
Available from: 2018-05-03 Created: 2018-05-03 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Mixter, S., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2018). Alternations between physical and mental tasks – a viable option for job rotation?. In: : . Paper presented at 20th Congress International Ergonomics Association, 26-30 August, 2018, Florens, Italy.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alternations between physical and mental tasks – a viable option for job rotation?
2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27878 (URN)
Conference
20th Congress International Ergonomics Association, 26-30 August, 2018, Florens, Italy
Funder
AFA Insurance
Available from: 2018-09-07 Created: 2018-09-07 Last updated: 2018-09-10Bibliographically approved
Locks, F., Gupta, N., Hallman, D., Birk Jørgensen, M. & Holtermann, A. (2018). Association between objectively measured static standing and low back pain - a cross-sectional study among blue-collar workers. Ergonomics, 61(9), 1196-1207
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between objectively measured static standing and low back pain - a cross-sectional study among blue-collar workers
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2018 (English)In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 61, no 9, p. 1196-1207Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aims to investigate the cross-sectional association between objectively measured total time and temporal patterns of static standing (short bouts: 0-5 min; moderate bouts: >5-10 min; and long bouts: >10 min) during work and leisure and low back pain (LBP) among 698 blue-collar workers. Workers reported LBP on a 0-10 scale. The association between time spent on static standing and LBP was tested with linear regression. A positive association with LBP intensity was found for long bouts of static standing (β = 0.27) during total day (work + leisure), and total static standing time at leisure (β = 0.12). No significant associations were found for static standing during work and LBP intensity. These findings indicate that particularly long bouts of static standing over the entire day contribute to LBP in blue-collar workers.

Keywords
Accelerometry; Body posture; Occupational health; Physical activity; Standing work
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23135 (URN)10.1080/00140139.2018.1455900 (DOI)000445304000004 ()29560812 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044766798 (Scopus ID)
Projects
SitNeck
Available from: 2016-12-22 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2018-10-15Bibliographically approved
Hallman, D. & Holtermann, A. (2018). Can the daily time-pattern differentiate the health effects of physical activity?. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 15(10 Suppl. 1), S3
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can the daily time-pattern differentiate the health effects of physical activity?
2018 (English)In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health, ISSN 1543-3080, E-ISSN 1543-5474, Vol. 15, no 10 Suppl. 1, p. S3-Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Human Kinetics, 2018
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-28660 (URN)000446516100012 ()
Available from: 2018-11-26 Created: 2018-11-26 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved
Coenen, P., Mathiassen, S. E., van der Beek, A. & Hallman, D. (2018). Correction of bias in self-reported sitting time among office workers – a study based on compositional data analysis. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correction of bias in self-reported sitting time among office workers – a study based on compositional data analysis
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990XArticle in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Keywords
sitting, sedentary behaviour, occupational, calibration, bias
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-28757 (URN)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Available from: 2018-12-04 Created: 2018-12-04 Last updated: 2018-12-06Bibliographically approved
Projects
Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor [TRV 2015/43010]; University of Gävle; Publications
Haapakangas, A., Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E. & Jahncke, H. (2018). Self-rated productivity and employee well-being in activity-based offices: the role of environmental perceptions and workspace use. Building and Environment, 145, 115-124Jahncke, H., Persson, L. & Hallman, D. (2017). Aktivitetsbaserade arbetsplatser: Koncentration, stillasittande och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor: Kartläggning år 2015-2017. Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor A: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor B: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor C: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor D: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor E: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i Gävle
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2741-1868

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