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Stevens, M., Crowley, P., Lund Rasmussen, C., Hallman, D., Mortensen, O., Nygård, C.-H. & Holtermann, A. (2020). Accelerometer-measured physical activity at work and need for recovery: A compositional analysis of cross-sectional data. Annals of Work Exposures and Health, 64(2), 138-151
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accelerometer-measured physical activity at work and need for recovery: A compositional analysis of cross-sectional data
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2020 (English)In: Annals of Work Exposures and Health, ISSN 2398-7308, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 138-151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

Previous research has shown strong associations between occupational physical activity (OPA) and need for recovery (NFR). However this research has only utilized self-reported measures of OPA which may be biased. Thus, there is a need for investigating if the previously documented association between self-reported OPA and NFR can be found when using technical measures of OPA. There is also the need to investigate whether older workers are particularly susceptible to increased NFR, since age-related declines in physical capacity mean that it is likely these workers will have a higher NFR for a given physical activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between technically measured OPA and NFR, and whether this relationship is modified by age.

Methods

This study utilized data from the Danish Physical Activity Cohort with Objective Measurements cohort—comprising Danish workers (n = 840) from the cleaning, manufacturing, and transportation sectors. OPA was measured by accelerometers attached to the thigh and upper back for at least one work day and classified into four physical behaviour categories (sedentary, standing, light, or moderate/vigorous). NFR was measured using a shortened version of the Danish NFR scale. Analysis was conducted using linear regression and isotemporal substitution analyses for compositional data.

Results

The overall association between OPA and NFR was statistically significant in the unadjusted model (P < 0.001), but not when adjusted for age, sex, occupation, and shift work (P = 0.166). Isotemporal substitution showed small but significant reductions in NFR when increasing sedentary time relative to other behaviours (adjusted: ΔNFR = −0.010 [−0.019; −0.001]). There were no significant interactions between age and OPA (P = 0.409).

Conclusions

This study found significant associations between OPA and NFR, but the effect sizes were small. Reallocating 30 min to sedentary behaviours from other behaviours was associated with a reduced NFR, but the effect size may not be practically relevant. Moreover, no clear modifying effects of age were identified.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2020
Keywords
blue-collar workers, compositional data analysis, physical activity, physical behaviour, need for recovery, triaxial accelerometers
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-31082 (URN)10.1093/annweh/wxz095 (DOI)31879769 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85080846293 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-11-26 Created: 2019-11-26 Last updated: 2020-03-17Bibliographically approved
Januario, L., Stevens, M., Mathiassen, S. E., Holtermann, A., Karstad, K. & Hallman, D. (2020). Combined effects of physical behavior compositions and psychosocial resources on perceived exertion among eldercare workers.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Combined effects of physical behavior compositions and psychosocial resources on perceived exertion among eldercare workers
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2020 (English)In: Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-32054 (URN)
Available from: 2020-03-19 Created: 2020-03-19 Last updated: 2020-03-20Bibliographically approved
Coenen, P., Mathiassen, S. E., van der Beek, A. & Hallman, D. (2020). Correction of bias in self-reported sitting time among office workers – a study based on compositional data analysis. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 46(1), 32-42
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correction of bias in self-reported sitting time among office workers – a study based on compositional data analysis
2020 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 32-42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Emerging evidence suggests that excessive sitting has negative health effects. However, this evidence largely relies on research using self-reported sitting time, which is known to be biased. To correct this bias, we aimed at developing a calibration model estimating "true" sitting from self-reported sitting.

Methods: Occupational sitting time was estimated by self-reports (the International Physical Activity Questionnaire) and objective measurements (thigh-worn accelerometer) among 99 Swedish office workers at a governmental agency, at baseline and 3 and 12 months afterwards. Following compositional data analysis procedures, both sitting estimates were transformed into isometric log-ratios (ILR). This effectively addresses that times spent in various activities are inherently dependent and can be presented as values of only 0−100%. Linear regression was used to develop a simple calibration model estimating objectively measured "true" sitting ILR (dependent variable) from self-reported sitting ILR (independent variable). Additional self-reported variables were then added to construct a full calibration model. Performance of the models was assessed by root-mean-square (RMS) differences between estimated and objectively measured values. Models developed on baseline data were validated using the follow-up datasets.

Results: Uncalibrated self-reported sitting ILR showed an RMS error of 0.767. Simple and full calibration models (incorporating body mass index, office type, and gender) reduced this error to 0.422 (55%) and 0.398 (52%), respectively. In the validations, model performance decreased to 57%/62% (simple models) and 57%/62% (full models) for the two follow-up data sets, respectively.

Conclusions: Calibration adjusting for errors in self-reported sitting led to substantially more correct estimates of "true" sitting than uncalibrated self-reports. Validation indicated that model performance would change somewhat in new datasets and that full models perform no better than simple models, but calibration remained effective.

Keywords
calibration, calibration model, compositional data analysis, occupational health, sedentary behavior
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-28757 (URN)10.5271/sjweh.3827 (DOI)000515153200004 ()31012945 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Available from: 2018-12-04 Created: 2018-12-04 Last updated: 2020-03-17Bibliographically approved
Oakman, J., Stevens, M., Karstad, K., Hallman, D., Rugulies, R. & Holtermann, A. (2020). Do organisational and ward-level factors explain the variance in multi-site musculoskeletal pain in eldercare workers? A multi-level cross-sectional study. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do organisational and ward-level factors explain the variance in multi-site musculoskeletal pain in eldercare workers? A multi-level cross-sectional study
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2020 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose

Multi-site musculoskeletal pain (MSP) is highly prevalent among eldercare workers, leading to increased incidence of sickness absence and early retirement. Most research on MSP in eldercare workers has focused on individual-level factors reported by the employees, with limited focus at the organisation and ward level. To address this gap, the aim of this study was to investigate whether organisation and ward-level factors explain the variance in MSP among Danish eldercare workers.

Methods

A multi-level cross-sectional study was conducted among 20 Danish nursing homes, containing 126 wards, and 418 workers who participated in measurements of organisational factors, working environment factors, and MSP (classified as reporting pain in 2 or more body regions). Data were collected at the level of the organisation, ward, and individual. The proportion of variance in MSP explained by each level was estimated using variance components analysis. The association between factors at each level of the organisation and MSP was investigated using generalised linear mixed-effects regression.

Results

Sixty seven percent of participants reported having MSP. The organisational and ward-level factors explained 0% of the variance in MSP, while the individual-level factors explained 100% of the variance in MSP. Moreover, no factors at the organisational and ward levels showed statistically significant associations with MSP. Individual-level perceived physical exertion and quantitative demands had a statistically significant association with a higher prevalence of MSP.

Conclusions

The organisation and ward levels did not contribute to explaining any of the variance in MSP. All variance in MSP was explained at the individual level.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Aged care, Eldercare, Hierarchical, Multi-site pain, Musculoskeletal pain, Physical demands
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-32196 (URN)10.1007/s00420-020-01540-7 (DOI)000527500400002 ()32306179 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85083893409 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-04-22 Created: 2020-04-22 Last updated: 2020-05-07Bibliographically approved
Gupta, N., Hallman, D., Dumuid, D., Vij, A., Lund Rasmussen, C., Birk Jørgensen, M. & Holtermann, A. (2020). Movement behavior profiles and obesity: a latent profile analysis of 24-h time-use composition among Danish workers. International Journal of Obesity, 44(2), 409-417
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Movement behavior profiles and obesity: a latent profile analysis of 24-h time-use composition among Danish workers
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2020 (English)In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 409-417Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background/objectives

An element of obesity prevention is increasing total physical activity energy expenditure. However, this approach does not incorporate the balance of various movement behaviors—physical activity, sedentary behaviors and sleep - across domains of the day. We aimed to identify time-use profiles over work and leisure, termed ‘movement behavior profiles’ and to investigate their association with obesity.

Subjects/methods

Eight-hundred-and-seven workers completed (a) thigh accelerometry and diaries to determine their 24-h composition of behaviors (sedentary and standing, light physical activity and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity at work and leisure, and time in bed) and (b) obesity measurements. Movement behavior profiles were determined using latent profile analyses of isometric log-ratios of the 24-h composition, and labeled according to animal movement behavior traits. Linear models were applied to determine the association between profiles and obesity.

Results

Four profiles were identified, labeled as “Chimpanzees” (n = 226), “Lions” (n = 179), “Ants” (n = 244), and “Koalas” (n = 158). “Chimpanzees” work time was evenly distributed between behaviors while their leisure time was predominantly active. Compared to Chimpanzees, “Lions” were more active at work and sedentary during leisure and spent more time in bed; “Ants” were more active at work and during leisure; “Koalas” were more sedentary at work and leisure and spent similar time in bed. With “Chimpanzees” as reference, “Lions” had least favorable obesity indicators: +2.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.6, 3.4) %body fat, +4.3 cm (1.4, 7.3) waist circumference and +1.0 (2.0, 0.0) Body Mass Index (BMI), followed by “Koalas” +2.0 (0.4, 3.7) %body fat, +3.1 cm (0.1, 6.0) waist circumference, and +0.8 (−0.30, 1.94) BMI. No significant differences were found between “Chimpanzees” and “Ants”.

Conclusions

Movement behavior profiles across work and leisure time-use compositions are associated with obesity. Achieving adequate balance between work and leisure movement behaviors should be further investigated as a potential obesity prevention strategy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2020
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30568 (URN)10.1038/s41366-019-0419-8 (DOI)000510753800015 ()31341260 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85069632196 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agency:

- Danish work environment research fund (journal number 01–2015–03) - Danish government (satspulje)

Available from: 2019-08-23 Created: 2019-08-23 Last updated: 2020-02-17Bibliographically approved
Jahncke, H. & Hallman, D. (2020). Objective measures of cognitive performance in activity based workplaces and traditional office types. Journal of Environmental Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Objective measures of cognitive performance in activity based workplaces and traditional office types
2020 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Keywords
cognitive task; memory; noise; cell office; flex office; open-plan office
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-32013 (URN)
Available from: 2020-03-08 Created: 2020-03-08 Last updated: 2020-03-09Bibliographically approved
Clays, E., Hallman, D., Oakman, J. & Holtermann, A. (2020). Objectively measured occupational physical activity in blue-collar workers: What is the role of job type, gender and psychosocial resources?. Applied Ergonomics, 82, Article ID 102948.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Objectively measured occupational physical activity in blue-collar workers: What is the role of job type, gender and psychosocial resources?
2020 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 82, article id 102948Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim was to describe occupational physical activity (OPA) and examine the role of psychosocial job resources among blue-collar workers. In a sample of 198 workers (57% male; mean age 44.9 (SD 9.9) year) from 7 companies in Denmark, two accelerometers (Actigraph) were placed on the thigh and trunk during 1-5 consecutive days, to determine working time spent standing, walking, on feet and in activity of moderate to vigorous intensity level (MVPA). The level of influence and social support at work were assessed by questionnaire. The exposure to OPA significantly varied by particular job type, especially in male predominant occupations. Overall, psychosocial job resources did not affect the exposure to OPA. These findings suggest that workplace interventions aiming to prevent adverse outcomes of OPA among blue-collars workers ought to focus on task redesign and target work organizational factors related to specific job type.

Keywords
Blue-collar, Objective measurement, Occupational physical activity, Psychosocial, Work organization
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30726 (URN)10.1016/j.apergo.2019.102948 (DOI)000501647900022 ()31493536 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85071640451 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-03 Created: 2019-10-03 Last updated: 2020-01-24Bibliographically approved
Neupane, S., Karstad, K., Hallman, D., Rugulies, R. & Holtermann, A. (2020). Objectively measured versus self-reported occupational physical activity and multisite musculoskeletal pain: A prospective follow-up study at 20 nursing homes in Denmark. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 93, 381-389
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Objectively measured versus self-reported occupational physical activity and multisite musculoskeletal pain: A prospective follow-up study at 20 nursing homes in Denmark
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2020 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 93, p. 381-389Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

To explore the prospective association of objectively measured and self-reported occupational physical activity (OPA) with multisite musculoskeletal pain (MSP) among Danish eldercare workers.

Methods

The study population consisted of eldercare workers in 20 Danish nursing homes (N = 553, response rate 59%, 525 female). Baseline data were collected in 2013–2014 and the 1-year follow-up was completed in 2016. At baseline, we measured objective OPA by a thigh-worn ActiGraph GT3X + accelerometer during work and self-reported OPA by a questionnaire survey. Information on musculoskeletal pain during the past four weeks in seven different body sites was reported by a structured questionnaire at baseline (n = 389) and by SMS and telephone interview during follow-up (n = 284). MSP was defined as having pain in two or more body sites. Using log-binomial models we calculated risk ratios (RRs) with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to estimate the association between objectively measured and self-reported OPA and MSP.

Results

We found statistically significant positive associations between self-reported OPA (RR for high OPA 1.24, 95% CI 1.05–1.46) and MSP while there was no significant association found between objective OPA and MSP.

Conclusion

Our study indicates that self-reported, but not objectively measured OPA is positively associated with MSP. This finding highlights the need for better understanding, use, and interpretation of self-reported and objectively measured OPA in the study of MSP.

Keywords
Musculoskeletal pain, Multisite pai, n Occupational physical activity, Objective measures, Self-report
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30994 (URN)10.1007/s00420-019-01495-4 (DOI)000498090100001 ()31760469 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85075450703 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-11-19 Created: 2019-11-19 Last updated: 2020-03-20Bibliographically approved
Bjärntoft, S., Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E., Larsson, J. & Jahncke, H. (2020). Occupational and individual determinants of work-life balance among office workers with flexible work arrangements. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(4), Article ID 1418.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupational and individual determinants of work-life balance among office workers with flexible work arrangements
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2020 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 4, article id 1418Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Flexible work arrangements permitting workers to work anytime and anywhere are increasingly common. This flexibility can introduce both challenges and opportunities for the organisation, as well as for worker work-life balance (WLB). This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the extent to which occupational factors (organizational, leadership and psychosocial) and individual work-related behaviours (over-commitment, overtime work and boundary management) are associated with WLB, and whether these associations are modified by the perceived level of flexibility at work (i.e., control over when, where, and how to do the work). In total, 2960 full-time office workers with flexible work arrangements at the Swedish Transport Administration participated. Associations were determined using linear regression analyses with adjustment for covariates. The strongest negative associations with WLB were found for over-commitment, quantitative job demands, expectations of availability, and overtime work. Strongest positive associations were found for boundary management, information about organizing work, social support, and relation-oriented leadership. Perceived flexibility was positively associated with WLB, and interacted with several of the examined factors, buffering their negative associations with WLB. Results suggest that WLB can be promoted by organizational initiatives focusing on minimizing excessive job demands, increasing psychosocial resources, supporting boundary management, and enhancing perceived flexibility.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2020
Keywords
work-life balance; autonomy; job resources; job demands; work control
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30408 (URN)10.3390/ijerph17041418 (DOI)000522388500294 ()32098327 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85079902220 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761Swedish Transport Administration, 2015/92392
Available from: 2019-07-05 Created: 2019-07-05 Last updated: 2020-04-23Bibliographically approved
Johansson, E., Mathiassen, S. E., Lund Rasmussen, C. & Hallman, D. (2020). Sitting, standing and moving during work and leisure among male and female office workers of different age: A compositional data analysis. BMC Public Health, 20, Article ID 826.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sitting, standing and moving during work and leisure among male and female office workers of different age: A compositional data analysis
2020 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 20, article id 826Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Gendered patterns of physical activity behaviours may help explaining health inequalities between men and women. However, evidence on such patterns in the working population is sparse. This study aimed at documenting and comparing compositions of sitting, standing and moving at work and during leisure among male and female office workers of different age.

Methods Sitting (including lying), standing and moving were measured using accelerometry for, on average, four working days in 55 male and 57 female Swedish office workers. Behaviours were described in terms of time spent in four exhaustive categories: sitting in short (<30 min) and long (≥30 min) bouts, standing, and moving. In a compositional data analysis approach, isometric log-ratios (ilr) were calculated for time sitting relative to non-sitting, time in short relative to long sitting bouts, and time in standing relative to moving. Differences between genders (men vs. women), domains (work vs. leisure), and according to age were examined for each ilr using ANOVA.

Results At work, time spent sitting in short bouts, sitting in long bouts, standing, and moving was, on average, 29%, 43%, 21% and 7% among men, and 28%, 38%, 26% and 7% among women. Corresponding proportions during leisure were 34%, 27%, 27% and 13% among men and 28%, 27%, 32% and 13% among women. Men spent more time sitting relative to non-sitting (partial eta-squared=0.04, p=0.03) than women, and less time standing relative to moving (pes=0.07, p=0.01). At work compared to during leisure, both genders spent more time sitting relative to non-sitting (pes=0.47, p<0.01); within sitting more time was spent in long relative to short sitting bouts (pes=0.26, p<0.01), and within non-sitting, more time was spent standing than moving (pes=0.12, p<0.01). Older workers spent less of their non-sitting time moving than younger workers (pes=0.07, p=0.01).

Conclusion Male office workers spent more time sitting relative to non-sitting than female workers, and more time moving relative to standing. Both genders were sitting more at work than during leisure. Older workers moved less than younger. These workers could likely benefit from interventions to reduce or break up prolonged sitting time, preferably by moving more.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2020
Keywords
Accelerometry, Age, CoDA, Gender, Occupational, Physical activity
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30708 (URN)10.1186/s12889-020-08909-w (DOI)32487107 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Available from: 2019-09-29 Created: 2019-09-29 Last updated: 2020-06-05Bibliographically approved
Projects
Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor [TRV 2015/43010]; University of Gävle; Publications
Jahncke, H. & Hallman, D. (2020). Objective measures of cognitive performance in activity based workplaces and traditional office types. Journal of Environmental PsychologyHaapakangas, A., Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E. & Jahncke, H. (2019). The effects of moving into an activity-based office on communication, social relations and work demands – A controlled intervention with repeated follow-up. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 66, Article ID 101341. Haapakangas, A., Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E. & Jahncke, H. (2018). Self-rated productivity and employee well-being in activity-based offices: the role of environmental perceptions and workspace use. Building and Environment, 145, 115-124Jahncke, H., Persson, L. & Hallman, D. (2017). Aktivitetsbaserade arbetsplatser: Koncentration, stillasittande och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor: Kartläggning år 2015-2017. Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor A: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor B: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor C: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor D: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor E: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i Gävle
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2741-1868

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