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Ong, T., Lin, B., Philott, S., Barthel, S. & Levin, S. (2019). A model for growing and shrinking cities: Urban gardens as a bridge. In: : . Paper presented at ESA (Ecological Society of America) Annual meeting 2019, 11-16 August, Louisville, KY, USA. Louisville, USA
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A model for growing and shrinking cities: Urban gardens as a bridge
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2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Louisville, USA: , 2019
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-31057 (URN)
Conference
ESA (Ecological Society of America) Annual meeting 2019, 11-16 August, Louisville, KY, USA
Available from: 2019-11-25 Created: 2019-11-25 Last updated: 2019-11-27Bibliographically approved
Holmgren, M., Kabanshi, A., Langeborg, L., Barthel, S., Colding, J., Eriksson, O. & Sörqvist, P. (2019). Deceptive sustainability: Cognitive bias in people's judgment of the benefits of CO2 emission cuts. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 64, 48-55
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deceptive sustainability: Cognitive bias in people's judgment of the benefits of CO2 emission cuts
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 64, p. 48-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

People's beliefs in the actions necessary to reduce anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are important to public policy acceptability. The current paper addressed beliefs concerning how periods of small emission cuts contribute to the total CO2 concentration in the atmosphere, by asking participants to rate the atmospheric CO2 concentration for various time periods and emission rates. The participants thought that a time period with higher emission rates combined with a period of lower emission rates generates less atmospheric CO2 in total, compared to the period with high emission rates alone – demonstrating a negative footprint illusion (Study 1). The participants appeared to base their CO2 estimates on the average, rather than on the accumulated sum, of the two periods' emissions – i.e. an averaging bias (Study 2). Moreover, the effect was robust to the wordings of the problem presented to the participants (Study 3). Together, these studies suggest that the averaging bias makes people exaggerate the benefits of small emission cuts. The averaging bias could make people willing to accept policies that reduce emission rates although insufficiently to alleviate global warming.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Climate change; Global warming; Averaging bias; Negative footprint illusion
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29596 (URN)10.1016/j.jenvp.2019.05.005 (DOI)000484869600006 ()2-s2.0-85066452463 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-24 Created: 2019-05-24 Last updated: 2019-10-09Bibliographically approved
Colding, J. & Barthel, S. (2019). Exploring the social-ecological systems discourse 20 years later. Ecology & society, 24(1), 423-432, Article ID 2.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the social-ecological systems discourse 20 years later
2019 (English)In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 423-432, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper explores the 20-year evolution of the social-ecological systems framework (SESs). Although a first definition of SES dates back to 1988, Berkes and Folke more thoroughly used the concept in 1998 to analyze resilience in local resource management systems. Since then studies of interlinked human and natural systems have emerged as a field on its own right, promoting interdisciplinary dialogue and collaboration in a wide set of fields and practices. As the SES concept celebrates its 20-year existence we decided to make an overview of how authors use the concept in relation to research that deals with social and ecological linkages. Hence, we conducted a review of the SES concept using the Scopus database, analyzing a random set of journal articles on social-ecological systems (n = 50) regarding definitions of SES, authors’ main sources of inspiration in using the concept, as well as document type, subject area, and other relevant information. Although there is a steady increase of SES publications, we found that 61% of the papers analyzed did not even provide a definition of the term social-ecological system(s), a shortcoming that makes case comparisons difficult and reduces the usefulness of the concept. We also found three common SES frameworks that authors seem to be most commonly inspired by, referred to here as the original, the robustness, and multitier frameworks, respectively. The first can be characterized as a descriptive framework, the latter two more as diagnostic frameworks, useful for modeling. Although it would be a bit presumptuous of us to come up with a more thorough definition of the SES concept in this paper, we urge SES scholars to be more meticulous in making explicit what they mean by a social-ecological system when conducting SES research. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Resilience Alliance, 2019
Keywords
Multitier framework, Original SES framework, Robustness framework, SES modeling, Social-ecological systems, Scopus
National Category
Other Social Sciences Other Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29905 (URN)10.5751/ES-10598-240102 (DOI)000464153200008 ()2-s2.0-85065798993 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
Available from: 2019-06-14 Created: 2019-06-14 Last updated: 2019-11-25Bibliographically approved
Barthel, S., Isendahl, C., Vis, B., Drescher, A., Evans, D. & van Timmeren, A. (2019). Global urbanization and food production in direct competition for land: Leverage places to mitigate impacts on SDG2 and on the Earth System. The Anthropocene Review, 6(1-2), 71-97
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global urbanization and food production in direct competition for land: Leverage places to mitigate impacts on SDG2 and on the Earth System
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2019 (English)In: The Anthropocene Review, ISSN 2053-0196, Vol. 6, no 1-2, p. 71-97Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Global urbanization and food production are in direct competition for land. This paper carries outa critical review of how displacing crop production from urban and peri-urban land to other areas– because of issues related to soil quality – will demand a substantially larger proportion of theEarth’s terrestrial land surface than the surface area lost to urban encroachment. Such relationshipsmay trigger further distancing effects and unfair social-ecological teleconnections. It risks also settingin motion amplifying effects within the Earth System. In combination, such multiple stressors set thescene for food riots in cities of the Global South. Our review identifies viable leverage points on whichto act in order to navigate urban expansion away from fertile croplands. We first elaborate on thepolitical complexities in declaring urban and peri-urban lands with fertile soils as one global commons.We find that the combination of an advisory global policy aligned with regional policies enablingrobust common properties rights for bottom-up actors and movements in urban and peri-urbanagriculture (UPA) as multi-level leverage places to intervene. To substantiate the ability of aligningglobal advisory policy with regional planning, we review both past and contemporary examples whereempowering local social-ecological UPA practices and circular economies have had a stimulatingeffect on urban resilience and helped preserve, restore, and maintain urban lands with healthy soils.

Keywords
cropland, economic globalization, food security, Global South, global sustainability, human resilience, social-ecological teleconnection, soil health, urban and peri-urban agriculture, urbanization
National Category
Environmental Sciences related to Agriculture and Land-use
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30789 (URN)10.1177/2053019619856672 (DOI)000474897200005 ()2-s2.0-85068231977 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-14 Created: 2019-10-14 Last updated: 2019-11-27Bibliographically approved
Marcus, L., Pont, M. B. & Barthel, S. (2019). Towards a socio-ecological spatial morphology: integrating elements of urban morphology and landscape ecology. Urban morphology, 23(2), 115-124
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards a socio-ecological spatial morphology: integrating elements of urban morphology and landscape ecology
2019 (English)In: Urban morphology, ISSN 1027-4278, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 115-124Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The recent shift towards greater emphasis on biodiversity and urban ecosystems has increased the need for greater understanding of the green areas in cities as ecological environments. However, landscape ecology and urban morphology have yet to be integrated into a joint field. In this paper steps are taken towards developing an integrated socio-ecological urban morphology based on developments in each field. Such a morphology can inform professional practice in urban design. Comparisons of the different objects of description in the two fields are made and their different means of description - notably the patches, corridors and the matrix in landscape ecology, and the streets, plots and buildings in urban morphology. This provides a basis for a joint description in which these elements together form a configuration of patches.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
INT SEMINAR URBAN FORM, 2019
Keywords
urban morphology, landscape ecology, sustainability, socio-ecological urbanism, urban design
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30763 (URN)000484768100002 ()
Available from: 2019-10-09 Created: 2019-10-09 Last updated: 2019-10-09Bibliographically approved
Samuelsson, K., Colding, J. & Barthel, S. (2019). Urban resilience at eye level: spatial analysis of empirically defined experiential landscapes. Landscape and Urban Planning, 187, 70-80
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urban resilience at eye level: spatial analysis of empirically defined experiential landscapes
2019 (English)In: Landscape and Urban Planning, ISSN 0169-2046, E-ISSN 1872-6062, Vol. 187, p. 70-80Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An unresolved issue in creating resilient cities is how to obtain sustainability benefits from densification while not eroding the capacity of social-ecological systems to generate wellbeing for urban dwellers. To understand how different relationships between urban form and wellbeing together play out, we analysed geocoded experiential data (1460 experiences from 780 respondents) together with variables of the physical environment. Through statistical and spatial analysis, we operationalised resilience principles to assess what urban environments provide “resilience at eye level” – a diversity of experiences and a level of connectivity between them that limit adverse outcomes. We found 8 typologies of experiential landscapes – distinct compositions of 11 categories of experiences. Our analysis shows that typologies with experiences supportive of wellbeing are diverse and exist in environments that balance residents and workplaces, avoid extreme spatial integration and/or density and have accessible nature. Typologies with many experiences hindering wellbeing fail in one or several of these respects. Our findings suggest that resilience principles can act as a guiding heuristic for urban densification that does not compromise human wellbeing.

National Category
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29049 (URN)10.1016/j.landurbplan.2019.03.015 (DOI)000467665900007 ()2-s2.0-85063913195 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-04 Created: 2019-01-04 Last updated: 2019-11-28Bibliographically approved
Colding, J., Barthel, S. & Sörqvist, P. (2019). Wicked Problems of Smart Cities. Smart Cities, 2(4), 512-521
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wicked Problems of Smart Cities
2019 (English)In: Smart Cities, ISSN 2624-6511, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 512-521Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is often uncritically assumed that, when digital technologies are integrated into the operation of city functions, they inevitably contribute to sustainable urban development. Such a notion rests largely on the belief that Information and Communication Technology (ICT) solutions pave the way for more democratic forms of planning, and that ‘smart’ technological devices result in a range of environmental benefits, e.g., energy efficiency and the mitigation of global warming. Drawing on the scientific literature that deals with ‘smart cities’, we here elaborate on how both propositions fail to consider drawbacks that could be characterized as ‘wicked’, i.e., problems that lack simplistic solutions and straightforward planning responses, and which often come about as ‘management surprises’, as a byproduct of achieving sustainability. We here deal with problems related to public choice constraints, ‘non-choice default technologies’ and the costs of automation for human learning and resilience. To avoid undemocratic forms of planning and too strong a dependence on non-choice default technologies, e.g., smart phones, we recommend that planners and policy makers safeguard redundancy in public-choice options by maintaining a wide range of alternative choices, including analog ones. Resilience thinking could help planners deal more effectively with the ‘wickedness’ of an increasingly hyper-connected society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
smart city; wicked problems; public choice constraints; automation; default technologies; resilience
National Category
Environmental Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-31000 (URN)10.3390/smartcities2040031 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2019-11-20 Created: 2019-11-20 Last updated: 2019-11-25Bibliographically approved
Raymond, C., Giusti, M. & Barthel, S. (2018). An embodied perspective on the co-production of cultural ecosystem services: Toward embodied ecosystems. Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, 61(5/6), 778-799
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An embodied perspective on the co-production of cultural ecosystem services: Toward embodied ecosystems
2018 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 61, no 5/6, p. 778-799Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite arguments justifying the need to consider how cultural ecosystem services are coproduced by humans and nature, there are currently few approaches for explaining the relationships between humans and ecosystems through embodied scientific realism. This realism recognises that human–environment connections are not solely produced in the mind, but through relations between mind, body, culture and environment through time. Using affordance theory as our guide, we compare and contrast embodied approaches to common understandings of the co-production of cultural ecosystem services across three assumptions: (1) perspective on cognition; (2) the position of socio-cultural processes and (3) typologies used to understand and value human–environment relationships. To support a deeper understanding of co-production, we encourage a shift towards embodied ecosystems for assessing the dynamic relations between mind, body, culture and environment. We discuss some of the advantages and limitations of this approach and conclude with directions for future research. 

Keywords
affordances, worldviews, social-ecological systems, sense of place, relational values, cultural ecosystem services
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-24139 (URN)10.1080/09640568.2017.1312300 (DOI)000430421700003 ()2-s2.0-85019594035 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-01193
Available from: 2017-06-12 Created: 2017-06-12 Last updated: 2019-11-28Bibliographically approved
Isendahl, C. & Barthel, S. (2018). Archaeology, history, and urban food security Integrating cross-cultural and long-term perspectives. In: Zeunert, J; Waterman, T (Ed.), ROUTLEDGE HANDBOOK OF LANDSCAPE AND FOOD: (pp. 61-72). ROUTLEDGE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Archaeology, history, and urban food security Integrating cross-cultural and long-term perspectives
2018 (English)In: ROUTLEDGE HANDBOOK OF LANDSCAPE AND FOOD / [ed] Zeunert, J; Waterman, T, ROUTLEDGE , 2018, p. 61-72Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROUTLEDGE, 2018
Series
Routledge Handbooks
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30600 (URN)000466582200005 ()978-1-315-64769-2 (ISBN)978-1-138-12515-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-08-28 Created: 2019-08-28 Last updated: 2019-08-28Bibliographically approved
Isendahl, C. & Barthel, S. (2018). Archeology, history, and urban food security: integrating cross-cultural and long-term perspectives (1ed.). In: Joshua Zeunert and Tim Waterman (Ed.), Routledge Handbook of Landscapes and Food: (pp. 61-73). New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Archeology, history, and urban food security: integrating cross-cultural and long-term perspectives
2018 (English)In: Routledge Handbook of Landscapes and Food / [ed] Joshua Zeunert and Tim Waterman, New York: Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 61-73Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Routledge, 2018 Edition: 1
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29121 (URN)978-1-315-64769-2 (ISBN)9781138125155 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-01-15 Created: 2019-01-15 Last updated: 2019-02-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2637-2024

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