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Publications (10 of 31) Show all publications
Samuelsson, K., Giusti, M., Peterson, G. D., Legeby, A., Brandt, S. A. & Barthel, S. (2018). Impact of environment on people’s everyday experiences in Stockholm. Landscape and Urban Planning, 171, 7-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of environment on people’s everyday experiences in Stockholm
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2018 (English)In: Landscape and Urban Planning, ISSN 0169-2046, E-ISSN 1872-6062, Vol. 171, p. 7-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In order to construct urban environments that limit negative impacts for global sustainability while supporting human wellbeing, there is a need to better understand how features of the environment influence people’s everyday experiences. We present a novel method for studying this combining accessibility analysis and public participatory GIS (PPGIS). Seven environment features are defined and accessibility to them analysed across Stockholm municipality. We estimate the probabilities of positive and negative experiences in places based on these environment features, by using spatial regression to extrapolate from the results of an online PPGIS survey (1784 experiences of 1032 respondents). Six of the seven studied environment features have significant impact on experiential outcome, after accounting for spatial autocorrelation among the data. The results show that number of residents and proximity of nature environments and water, all common quality indicators in urban planning and research, have weak statistically significant effects on people’s experiences. However, areas dominated by large working populations or proximity to major roads have very low rates of positive experiences, while areas with high natural temperature regulating capacities have very high rates, showing that there are considerable qualitative differences within urban environments as well as nature environments. Current urban planning practices need to acknowledge these differences to limit impacts on the biosphere while promoting human wellbeing. We suggest that a good way to start addressing this is through transformation of negatively experienced urban areas through designs that integrate closeness to urbanity with possibilities to have nature experiences on a daily basis. 

Keywords
Affordances, Public participatory GIS, Spatial regression, Urban ecosystem services, Urban social-ecological systems
National Category
Environmental Sciences Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25599 (URN)10.1016/j.landurbplan.2017.11.009 (DOI)000423643000002 ()2-s2.0-85035000677 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-01193Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-75
Available from: 2017-11-24 Created: 2017-11-24 Last updated: 2018-10-10Bibliographically approved
Myagmartseren, P., Buyandelger, M. & Brandt, S. A. (2017). Implications of a Spatial Multicriteria Decision Analysis for Urban Development in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. Mathematical problems in engineering (Print), 2017, Article ID 2819795.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implications of a Spatial Multicriteria Decision Analysis for Urban Development in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia
2017 (English)In: Mathematical problems in engineering (Print), ISSN 1024-123X, E-ISSN 1563-5147, Vol. 2017, article id 2819795Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

New technology has provided new tools for effective spatial planning. Through the example of locating suitable sites for urbandevelopment in Ulaanbaatar, this paper illustrates how multicriteria decision analysis and geographical information systems canbe used for more effective urban planning. Several constraint and factor criteria were identified, transformed into map layers,and weighted together using the analytic hierarchy process. Besides localization results, this study shows the effect of using poorelevation data and how a sensitivity analysis can be applied to yield further information, spot weighting weaknesses, and assess thequality of the criteria.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2017
National Category
Physical Geography Remote Sensing Other Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23637 (URN)10.1155/2017/2819795 (DOI)000395153100001 ()2-s2.0-85014138733 (Scopus ID)
Projects
GLOBES 2
Funder
Swedish Agency for Economic and Regional Growth, GLOBES 2, no. 170430
Available from: 2017-02-17 Created: 2017-02-17 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Jiang, B. & Brandt, S. A. (2016). A Fractal Perspective on Scale in Geography. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-information, 5(6), Article ID 95.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Fractal Perspective on Scale in Geography
2016 (English)In: ISPRS International Journal of Geo-information, ISSN 2220-9964, Vol. 5, no 6, article id 95Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Scale is a fundamental concept that has attracted persistent attention in geography literature over the past several decades. However, it creates enormous confusion and frustration, particularly in the context of geographic information science, because of scale-related issues such as image resolution and the modifiable areal unit problem (MAUP). This paper argues that the confusion and frustration arise from traditional Euclidean geometric thinking, in which locations, directions, and sizes are considered absolute, and it is now time to revise this conventional thinking. Hence, we review fractal geometry, together with its underlying way of thinking, and compare it to Euclidean geometry. Under the paradigm of Euclidean geometry, everything is measurable, no matter how big or small. However, most geographic features, due to their fractal nature, are essentially unmeasurable or their sizes depend on scale. For example, the length of a coastline, the area of a lake, and the slope of a topographic surface are all scale-dependent. Seen from the perspective of fractal geometry, many scale issues, such as the MAUP, are inevitable. They appear unsolvable, but can be dealt with. To effectively deal with scale-related issues, we present topological and scaling analyses illustrated by street-related concepts such as natural streets, street blocks, and natural cities. We further contend that one of the two spatial properties, spatial heterogeneity, is de facto the fractal nature of geographic features, and it should be considered the first effect among the two, because it is global and universal across all scales, which should receive more attention from practitioners of geography.

Keywords
scaling, spatial heterogeneity, conundrum of length, MAUP, topological analysis
National Category
Physical Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-22247 (URN)10.3390/ijgi5060095 (DOI)000379861200022 ()2-s2.0-85009101145 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-08-17 Created: 2016-08-17 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Brandt, S. A. (2016). Modeling and visualizing uncertainties of flood boundary delineation: algorithm for slope and DEM resolution dependencies of 1D hydraulic models. Stochastic environmental research and risk assessment (Print), 30(6), 1677-1690
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modeling and visualizing uncertainties of flood boundary delineation: algorithm for slope and DEM resolution dependencies of 1D hydraulic models
2016 (English)In: Stochastic environmental research and risk assessment (Print), ISSN 1436-3240, E-ISSN 1436-3259, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 1677-1690Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As flood inundation risk maps have become a central piece of information for both urban and risk management planning, also a need to assess the accuracies and uncertainties of these maps has emerged. Most maps show the inundation boundaries as crisp lines on visually appealing maps, whereby many planners and decision makers, among others, automatically believe the boundaries are both accurate and reliable. However, as this study shows, probably all such maps, even those that are based on high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs), have immanent uncertainties which can be directly related to both DEM resolution and the steepness of terrain slopes perpendicular to the river flow direction. Based on a number of degenerated DEMs, covering areas along the Eskilstuna River, Sweden, these uncertainties have been quantified into an empirically-derived disparity distance equation, yielding values of distance between true and modeled inundation boundary location. Using the inundation polygon, the DEM, a value representing the DEM resolution, and the desired level of confidence as inputs in a new-developed algorithm that utilizes the disparity distance equation, the slope and DEM dependent uncertainties can be directly visualized on a map. The implications of this strategy should benefit planning and help reduce high costs of floods where infrastructure, etc., have been placed in flood-prone areas without enough consideration of map uncertainties.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Keywords
1D hydraulic modeling, River flood inundation, Uncertainty, Quantile regression, Geographical information systems (GIS), Digital elevation model (DEM)
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Physical Geography Other Civil Engineering Climate Research Probability Theory and Statistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-20996 (URN)10.1007/s00477-016-1212-z (DOI)000379753200009 ()2-s2.0-84954554055 (Scopus ID)
Projects
GLOBES 2Kvalitetsbeskrivning av geografisk information vid översvämningskartering (Lantmäteriet)
Funder
Swedish Agency for Economic and Regional Growth, 170430
Note

Även finansiering från EU via Lantmäteriet (Projekt 2)

Available from: 2016-01-11 Created: 2016-01-11 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Lim, N. J., Brandt, S. A. & Seipel, S. (2016). Visualisation and evaluation of flood uncertainties based on ensemble modelling. International Journal of Geographical Information Science, 30(2), 240-262
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Visualisation and evaluation of flood uncertainties based on ensemble modelling
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Geographical Information Science, ISSN 1365-8816, E-ISSN 1365-8824, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 240-262Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study evaluates how users incorporate visualisation of flood uncertainty information in decision-making. An experiment was conducted where participants were given the task to decide building locations, taking into account homeowners’ preferences as well as dilemmas imposed by flood risks at the site. Two general types of visualisations for presenting uncertainties from ensemble modelling were evaluated: (1) uncertainty maps, which used aggregated ensemble results; and (2) performance bars showing all individual simulation outputs from the ensemble. Both were supplemented with either two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) contextual information, to give an overview of the area.The results showed that the type of uncertainty visualisation was highly influential on users’ decisions, whereas the representation of the contextual information (2D or 3D) was not. Visualisation with performance bars was more intuitive and effective for the task performed than the uncertainty map. It clearly affected users’ decisions in avoiding certain-to-be-flooded areas. Patterns to which the distances were decided from the homeowners’ preferred positions and the uncertainties were similar, when the 2D and 3D map models were used side by side with the uncertainty map. On the other hand, contextual information affected the time to solve the task. With the 3D map, it took the participants longer time to decide the locations, compared with the other combinations using the 2D model.Designing the visualisation so as to provide more detailed information made respondents avoid dangerous decisions. This has also led to less variation in their overall responses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
Keywords
visualisation, uncertainty, flood, ensemble modelling, decision-making
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-20124 (URN)10.1080/13658816.2015.1085539 (DOI)000365550900006 ()2-s2.0-84948086666 (Scopus ID)
Note

Finasierat via European Union (EU) through Tillvaxtverket [GLOBES 2 project] projektnummer: 170430

Available from: 2015-08-19 Created: 2015-08-19 Last updated: 2018-10-10Bibliographically approved
Brandt, S. A. & Lim, N. J. (2016). Visualising DEM-related flood-map uncertainties using a disparity-distance equation algorithm. In: A. H. Schumann, G. Blöschl, A. Castellarin, J. Dietrich, S. Grimaldi, U. Haberlandt, A. Montanari, D. Rosbjerg, A. Viglione, and S. Vorogushyn (Ed.), IAHS-AISH Proceedings and Reports: . Paper presented at 7th International Water Resources Management Conference of ICWRS, 18-20 May 2016, ochum, Germany (pp. 153-159). Göttingen: Copernicus Publications on behalf of International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS), 373
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Visualising DEM-related flood-map uncertainties using a disparity-distance equation algorithm
2016 (English)In: IAHS-AISH Proceedings and Reports / [ed] A. H. Schumann, G. Blöschl, A. Castellarin, J. Dietrich, S. Grimaldi, U. Haberlandt, A. Montanari, D. Rosbjerg, A. Viglione, and S. Vorogushyn, Göttingen: Copernicus Publications on behalf of International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) , 2016, Vol. 373, p. 153-159Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The apparent absoluteness of information presented by crisp-delineated flood boundaries can lead tomisconceptions among planners about the inherent uncertainties associated in generated flood maps. Even mapsbased on hydraulic modelling using the highest-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs), and calibrated withthe most optimal Manning’s roughness (n) coefficients, are susceptible to errors when compared to actual floodboundaries, specifically in flat areas. Therefore, the inaccuracies in inundation extents, brought about by thecharacteristics of the slope perpendicular to the flow direction of the river, have to be accounted for. Instead ofusing the typical Monte Carlo simulation and probabilistic methods for uncertainty quantification, an empiricalbaseddisparity-distance equation that considers the effects of both the DEM resolution and slope was used tocreate prediction-uncertainty zones around the resulting inundation extents of a one-dimensional (1-D) hydraulicmodel. The equation was originally derived for the Eskilstuna River where flood maps, based on DEM dataof different resolutions, were evaluated for the slope-disparity relationship. To assess whether the equation isapplicable to another river with different characteristics, modelled inundation extents from the Testebo Riverwere utilised and tested with the equation. By using the cross-sectional locations, water surface elevations, andDEM, uncertainty zones around the original inundation boundary line can be produced for different confidences.The results show that (1) the proposed method is useful both for estimating and directly visualising modelinaccuracies caused by the combined effects of slope and DEM resolution, and (2) the DEM-related uncertaintiesalone do not account for the total inaccuracy of the derived flood map. Decision-makers can apply it to alreadyexisting flood maps, thereby recapitulating and re-analysing the inundation boundaries and the areas that areuncertain. Hence, more comprehensive flood information can be provided when determining locations whereextra precautions are needed. Yet, when applied, users must also be aware that there are other factors that caninfluence the extent of the delineated flood boundary.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göttingen: Copernicus Publications on behalf of International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS), 2016
Series
IAHS-AISH Proceedings and Reports, ISSN 01447815 ; 373
Keywords
River floods, Hydraulic modelling, Inundation mapping, Digital elevation models (DEM), Uncertainty
National Category
Ocean and River Engineering Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Physical Geography Remote Sensing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-21496 (URN)10.5194/piahs-373-153-2016 (DOI)000391006000026 ()2-s2.0-85044511792 (Scopus ID)
Conference
7th International Water Resources Management Conference of ICWRS, 18-20 May 2016, ochum, Germany
Available from: 2016-05-13 Created: 2016-05-13 Last updated: 2018-10-10Bibliographically approved
Schmidinger, H. & Brandt, S. A. (2015). Närområdesexkursioner och inre motivation för bättre lärande: en studie i svenska gymnasieskolan. Nordidactica: Journal of Humanities and Social Science Education, 2015(1), 22-46
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Närområdesexkursioner och inre motivation för bättre lärande: en studie i svenska gymnasieskolan
2015 (Swedish)In: Nordidactica: Journal of Humanities and Social Science Education, ISSN 2000-9879, Vol. 2015, no 1, p. 22-46Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper reports results from two locally based geography excursions at two secondary schools in Sweden, in order to study how the pupils’ own experience from the local neighborhood, intrinsic motivation, and flow interact during the learning process to see if these parameters affect their understanding and knowledge of the studied objects. The methods used were observations during the excursions, as well as interviews and questionnaires afterwards. The results show that the pupils believe that they learn more when studying objects in their natural environment, i.e. outside their classroom. Furthermore, the results show that intrinsic motivation may be difficult, but not impossible, to achieve, and also that there are good opportunities for attaining flow. If the pupils can see patterns and structures of the objects and processes studied, they will start understand and gain knowledge. This process will increase chances for intrinsic motivation, which will further increase understanding and knowledge, and attaining flow. Once achieved, a spiral process of continued flow, continued intrinsic motivation, and increasing knowledge may be maintained.

Keywords
Locally based excursions, Intrinsic motivation, Flow, Geography, Secondary school education, Närområdesexkursioner, Inre motivation, Flow, Geografi, Gymnasieutbildning
National Category
Physical Geography Geology Human Geography Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-18903 (URN)
Available from: 2015-05-29 Created: 2015-02-02 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Schmidinger, H., Molin, L. & Brandt, S. A. (2014). Excursions in school – past and present from Swedish and Anglo-Saxon perspectives. European Journal of Geography, 5(4), 87-101
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Excursions in school – past and present from Swedish and Anglo-Saxon perspectives
2014 (English)In: European Journal of Geography, ISSN 1792-1341, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 87-101Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this article is to present the results from a review of literature on geography excursions and field studies and to discuss their development over time, focusing on purpose, content, method, and execution. The scope was limited to Swedish and Anglo-Saxon literature, produced after the year 1900. The results show that excursions and field studies have since long been important methods in school teaching, not only in the subject geography. One of the purposes of using excursions and field studies in teaching is to facilitate the learning process of pupils and students. Several authors arguing that learning improved when the objects are studied in the real world. We can see that a continuous process of change has altered contents as well as conduction of the excursions. The previous instrumental orientation has moved toward more pupil-participating work methods. Today preparation is a keyword in most texts on excursions, and the perspectives have been broadened.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Association of Geographers, 2014
Keywords
excursions, field studies, review of literature, Swedish, Anglo-Saxon
National Category
Educational Sciences Physical Geography Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-18251 (URN)2-s2.0-84924811990 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-03-21 Created: 2014-12-02 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Harrie, L., Larsson, K., Tenenbaum, D., Horemuz, M., Ridefelt, H., Lysell, G., . . . Lagerstedt, J. (2014). Some strategic national initiatives for the Swedish education in the geodata field. In: Joaquin Huerta, Sven Schade, Carlos Granell (Ed.), Connecting a Digital Europe through Location and Place: Selected best short papers and posters of the AGILE 2014 Conference, 3‐6 June 2014, Castellón, Spain. Paper presented at The 17th AGILE International Conference on Geographic Information Science, Castellón, Spain, June, 3-6, 2014. AGILE Digital Editions
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Some strategic national initiatives for the Swedish education in the geodata field
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2014 (English)In: Connecting a Digital Europe through Location and Place: Selected best short papers and posters of the AGILE 2014 Conference, 3‐6 June 2014, Castellón, Spain / [ed] Joaquin Huerta, Sven Schade, Carlos Granell, AGILE Digital Editions , 2014Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper describes national cooperation in Sweden launched by its universities and authorities, aimed at improving geodata education. These initiatives have been focused upon providing common access to geodata, the production of teaching materials in Swedish and organizing annual meetings for teachers. We argue that this type of cooperation is vital to providing high quality education for a poorly recognized subject in a country with a relatively small population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AGILE Digital Editions, 2014
Keywords
GIS, geodata, education, teaching material, spatial data infrastructure
National Category
Other Civil Engineering Remote Sensing Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-16919 (URN)978-90-816960-4-3 (ISBN)
Conference
The 17th AGILE International Conference on Geographic Information Science, Castellón, Spain, June, 3-6, 2014
Available from: 2014-09-26 Created: 2014-06-14 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Kordi, M. & Brandt, A. (2012). Effects of increasing fuzziness on analytic hierarchy process for spatial multicriteria decision analysis. Computers, Environment and Urban Systems, 36(1), 43-53
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of increasing fuzziness on analytic hierarchy process for spatial multicriteria decision analysis
2012 (English)In: Computers, Environment and Urban Systems, ISSN 0198-9715, E-ISSN 1873-7587, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 43-53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) involves techniques which relatively recently have received great increase in interest for their capabilities of solving spatial decision problems. One of the most frequently used techniques of MCDA is Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). In the AHP, decision-makers make pairwise comparisons between different criteria to obtain values of their relative importance. The AHP initially only dealt with crisp numbers or exact values in the pairwise comparisons, but later it has been modified and adapted to also consider fuzzy values. It is necessary to empirically validate the ability of the fuzzified AHP for solving spatial problems. Further, the effects of different levels of fuzzification on the method have to be studied. In the context of a hypothetical GIS-based decision-making problem of locating a dam in Costa Rica using real-world data, this paper illustrates and compares the effects of increasing levels of uncertainty exemplified through different levels of fuzzification of the AHP. Practical comparison of the methods in this work, in accordance with the theoretical research, revealed that by increasing the level of uncertainty or fuzziness in the fuzzy AHP, differences between results of the conventional and fuzzy AHPs become more significant. These differences in the results of the methods may affect the final decisions in decision-making processes. This study concludes that the AHP is sensitive to the level of fuzzification and decision-makers should be aware of this sensitivity while using the fuzzy AHP. Furthermore, the methodology described may serve as a guideline on how to perform a sensitivity analysis in spatial MCDA. Depending on the character of criteria weights, i.e. the degree of fuzzification, and its impact on the results of a selected decision rule (e.g. AHP), the results from a fuzzy analysis may be used to produce sensitivity estimates for crisp AHP MCDA methods.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2012
Keywords
Multicriteria decision analysis, Analytic hierarchy process, Fuzzy logic, Sensitivity analysis, Geographical information systems
National Category
Other Civil Engineering Water Engineering Remote Sensing Ocean and River Engineering Physical Geography Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Other Computer and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-10050 (URN)10.1016/j.compenvurbsys.2011.07.004 (DOI)000300128000004 ()2-s2.0-84855509013 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-09-07 Created: 2011-09-07 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3884-3084

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