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Sandberg, Mats
Publications (10 of 157) Show all publications
Yang, B., Melikov, A., Kabanshi, A., Zhang, C., Bauman, F. S., Cao, G., . . . Lin, Z. (2019). A review of advanced air distribution methods - theory, practice, limitations and solutions. Energy and Buildings, 202, Article ID 109359.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A review of advanced air distribution methods - theory, practice, limitations and solutions
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2019 (English)In: Energy and Buildings, ISSN 0378-7788, E-ISSN 1872-6178, Vol. 202, article id 109359Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ventilation and air distribution methods are important for indoor thermal environments and air quality. Effective distribution of airflow for indoor built environments with the aim of simultaneously offsetting thermal and ventilation loads in an energy efficient manner has been the research focus in the past several decades. Based on airflow characteristics, ventilation methods can be categorized as fully mixed or non-uniform. Non-uniform methods can be further divided into piston, stratified and task zone ventilation. In this paper, the theory, performance, practical applications, limitations and solutions pertaining to ventilation and air distribution methods are critically reviewed. Since many ventilation methods are buoyancy driving that confines their use for heating mode, some methods suitable for heating are discussed. Furthermore, measuring and evaluating methods for ventilation and air distribution are also discussed to give a comprehensive framework of the review.

Keywords
Fully mixing ventilation, Non-uniform ventilation, Air distribution, Thermal comfort, Air quality, Energy efficiency
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30538 (URN)10.1016/j.enbuild.2019.109359 (DOI)2-s2.0-85070316248 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-22 Created: 2019-08-22 Last updated: 2019-08-26Bibliographically approved
Hayati, A., Mattsson, M. & Sandberg, M. (2019). A wind tunnel study of wind-driven airing through open doors. The International Journal of Ventilation, 113-135
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A wind tunnel study of wind-driven airing through open doors
2019 (English)In: The International Journal of Ventilation, ISSN 1473-3315, E-ISSN 2044-4044, p. 113-135Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Temporarily enhanced natural ventilation of indoor environments can be achieved by opening windows and/or doors, i.e. airing. In this study, wind driven airing rate through doors was measured by tracer gas at a building model in a wind tunnel. Both single opening and cross flow airing was investigated, with doors placed in centrally on the long side of an elongated building model. It was found that cross flow airing yielded 4–20 times higher airing rate than single opening airing; lowest value occurring with opening surfaces perpendicular to wind direction. At single opening airing, windward positioned door yielded about 53% higher airing rate than leeward positioned. Inclusion of a draught lobby (extended entrance space) lowered airing rate by 27%, while higher wind turbulence increased it by 38%. Advection through turbulence appeared a more important airing mechanism than pumping. At cross flow, however, turbulence and draught lobby had practically no effect.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Wind-driven flow, Single-sided ventilation, Cross flow, Tracer gas decay method, Wind turbulence, Churches
National Category
Building Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25112 (URN)10.1080/14733315.2018.1435027 (DOI)000469880200003 ()2-s2.0-85042108561 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Church project
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 2011-002440
Available from: 2017-08-28 Created: 2017-08-28 Last updated: 2019-08-22Bibliographically approved
Kabanshi, A. & Sandberg, M. (2019). Entrainment and its Implications on Microclimate Ventilation Systems: Scaling the Velocity and Temperature Field of a Round Free Jet. Indoor Air, 29(2), 331-346
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Entrainment and its Implications on Microclimate Ventilation Systems: Scaling the Velocity and Temperature Field of a Round Free Jet
2019 (English)In: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 331-346Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research on microclimate ventilation systems, which mostly involve free jets, point to delivery of better ventilation in breathing zones. While the literature is comprehensive, the influence of contaminant entrainment in jet flows and its implications on the delivery of supplied air is not fully addressed. This paper present and discuss entrainment characteristics of a jet issued from a round nozzle (0.05 m diameter), in relation to ventilation, by exploring the velocity and temperature fields of the jet flow. The results show a trend suggesting that increasing the Reynolds number (Re) reduces ambient entrainment. As shown herein, about 30% concentration of ambient air entrained into the bulk jet flow at Re 2541 while Re 9233 had about 13% and 19% for Re = 6537/12026 at downstream distance of 8 diameters (40 cm). The study discusses that “moderate to high” Re may be ideal to reduce contaminant entrainment, but this is limited by delivery distance and possibly the risk of occupant discomfort. Incorporating the entrainment mixing factor (the ratio of room contaminants entrained into a jet flow) in performance measurements is proposed and further studies are recommended to verify results herein and test whether this is general to other nozzle configurations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
Entrainment, Round free jet, Microclimate ventilation systems, Temperature field, Velocity field, Entrainment mixing factor
National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-28736 (URN)10.1111/ina.12524 (DOI)000459637200016 ()30500986 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059514934 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-02 Created: 2018-12-02 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved
Yin, S., Li, Y., Fan, Y. & Sandberg, M. (2019). Experimental investigation of near-field stream-wise flow development and spatial structure in triple buoyant plumes. Building and Environment, 149, 79-89
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimental investigation of near-field stream-wise flow development and spatial structure in triple buoyant plumes
2019 (English)In: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 149, p. 79-89Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper presents a systematic experimental study on stream-wise flow development and spatial structure of triple buoyant plumes. Two-dimensional Particle Image Velocimetry (2-D PIV) is employed to resolve velocity fields. Stream-wise axial velocity profiles, flow structure, flow region parameters, and self-similarity properties are analyzed at different configurations that are characterized by spacing ratios S/W (source spacing S divided by source width W). From velocity fields and axial velocity profiles, a similar stream-wise developing trend is identified in different source configurations. When near-field plumes travel downstream, axial velocities increase rapidly, off-center velocity peaks get merged with the central peak, and the number of velocity peaks reduces with the downstream distance. A compact source layout, comparing with the wide one, could enhance the near-field plumes interaction and promote the plumes deflection significantly. Fundamentally, the stream-wise spatial structure of the triple plumes initially consists of a converging region, followed by a merging region, and finally a combined region. By examining the averaged velocity fields, flow recirculation with negative axial velocities is found to scarcely exist in the converging region. Merging level Zm and quasi-combined level Zqc are analyzed quantitatively and statistically. Within the studied S/W range, the normalized Zm shows a linear increase with S/W in the formula of Zm/H=2.007(S/W)+1.173 and the normalized Zqc gives a power law increase with S/W in the formula of Zqc/H=6.035(S/W)0.4959. In addition, triple plumes are found to establish self-similarity approximately at Z = 3H with S/W of 0.2 and at Z = 4.5H with S/W of 0.5.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2019
Keywords
Merging level, Quasi-combined level, Self-similarity, Source spacing, Spatial structure, Stream-wise flow development, Merging, Velocity, Velocity measurement, Flow development, Self-similarities, Buoyancy
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29063 (URN)10.1016/j.buildenv.2018.11.039 (DOI)000457118300008 ()2-s2.0-85058185482 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agency:

RGC GRF project of the Hong Kong SAR Government  Grant no: 17201817

Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-03-12Bibliographically approved
Sandberg, M., Kabanshi, A. & Wigö, H. (2019). Is building ventilation a process of diluting contaminants or delivering clean air?. Indoor + Built Environment
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is building ventilation a process of diluting contaminants or delivering clean air?
2019 (English)In: Indoor + Built Environment, ISSN 1420-326X, E-ISSN 1423-0070Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the performance of air distribution systems intended for dilution of contaminants (e.g. mixing ventilation) and those intended for delivery of clean air to local regions within rooms (e.g. personalized ventilation). We first start by distinguishing the systems by their visiting frequency behaviour. Then, the performance of the systems with respect to their possibility to influence contaminant concentration in the room or regions within the room is dealt with. Dilution capacity concept for mixing systems is discussed, and delivery capacity concept for systems intended to deliver clean air locally is introduced. Various ways for supply of clean air to regions within the room are presented and their pros and cons are discussed. In delivery capacity systems, the most important single parameter is the entrainment of ambient air into the primary supply flow. Therefore, methods of determining entrainment in these systems need to be defined and the results should be included when describing the performance of the air terminal devices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Probability to return, Visitation frequency, Dilution capacity, Delivery capacity, Entrainment, Entrainment mixing factor
National Category
Applied Mechanics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29401 (URN)10.1177/1420326X19837340 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-03-21 Created: 2019-03-21 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved
Kabanshi, A., Yang, B., Sörqvist, P. & Sandberg, M. (2019). Occupants’ perception of air movements and air quality in a simulated classroom with an intermittent air supply system. Indoor + Built Environment, 28(1), 63-76
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupants’ perception of air movements and air quality in a simulated classroom with an intermittent air supply system
2019 (English)In: Indoor + Built Environment, ISSN 1420-326X, E-ISSN 1423-0070, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 63-76Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study reported herein builds on occupant response to an intermittent air jet strategy (IAJS), which creates periodic airflow and non-isothermal conditions in the occupied zone.  Previous research has highlighted the benefits of IAJS on thermal climate and supports energy saving potential in view of human thermal perception of the indoor environment. In this study, the goal was to explore occupant acceptability of air movements and perceived indoor air quality, and to determine a way of assessing acceptable air movement conditions under IAJS. Thirty-six participants were exposed to twelve conditions: three room air temperatures (nominal: 22.5, 25.5 and 28.5 oC), each with varied air speeds (nominal: <0.15 m/s under mixing ventilation (MV), and 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 m/s under IAJS) measured at the breathing height (1.1 m). The results show that participants preferred low air movements at lower temperatures and high air movements at higher temperatures. A model to predict percentage satisfied with intermittent air movements was developed, and predicts that about 87% of the occupants within a thermal sensation range of slightly cool (-0.5) to slightly warm (+0.5), in compliance with ASHRAE standard 55, will find intermittent air movements acceptable between 23.7 oC and 29.1 oC within a velocity range of 0.4 – 0.8 m/s.  IAJS also improved participants’ perception of air quality in conditions deemed poor under MV. The findings support the potential of IAJS as a primary ventilation system in high occupant spaces such as classrooms. 

Keywords
Intermittent air jets, Air movement acceptability, Perceived air quality, High occupant density
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23753 (URN)10.1177/1420326X17732613 (DOI)000454140000006 ()2-s2.0-85042402784 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-03-15 Created: 2017-03-15 Last updated: 2019-01-28Bibliographically approved
Yin, S., Fan, Y., Sandberg, M. & Li, Y. (2019). PIV based POD analysis of coherent structures in flow patterns generated by triple interacting buoyant plumes. Building and Environment, 158, 165-181
Open this publication in new window or tab >>PIV based POD analysis of coherent structures in flow patterns generated by triple interacting buoyant plumes
2019 (English)In: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 158, p. 165-181Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The paper performs an investigation on multi-scale coherent structures that exist in different flow patterns of triple interacting plumes. Time-averaged and turbulent flow characteristics are first obtained by the two-dimensional (2-D) particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) method is then applied to extract the dominant coherent structures. Energy contributions, POD modes, and POD coefficients are systematically explored to understand the spatial-temporal characteristics of the coherent structures. The first three POD modes are most important in the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). Mode 1, as the most dominant mode, can contain about 10% TKE in an average sense. In addition, the first 12–14 POD modes can totally contribute 50% TKE. Hierarchical four-scale flow structures, independent of the flow patterns, are clearly identified when mode number increases, which are successively characterized by main flows (the 1st scale), larger-scale outer-side vortex rings (the 2nd scale), shear-layer vortex shedding (the 3rd scale), and smaller-scale homogeneous turbulent vortices (the 4th scale). Frequency spectra analysis confirms the co-existence of lower-frequency and higher-frequency periodic cycles in one certain POD mode. Dominant frequencies of the first three POD coefficient series (a1–a3) fall into the range of 0.025–0.187 Hz. Probability density analysis has identified negative/positive peak probability densities of the series a1. Cumulative probabilities of negative and positive coefficients are approximately equivalent during the sampling period. 

Keywords
Coherent structure, Energy contribution, Flow pattern, POD coefficient, POD mode, Triple interacting plumes, Flow fields, Kinetic energy, Kinetics, Principal component analysis, Probability, Shear flow, Turbulent flow, Velocity measurement, Vortex flow, POD modes, Flow patterns, decomposition analysis, particle image velocimetry, plume, probability density function, sampling, spatiotemporal analysis, spectral analysis, vorticity
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30534 (URN)10.1016/j.buildenv.2019.04.055 (DOI)000468894500015 ()2-s2.0-85065614068 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-21 Created: 2019-08-21 Last updated: 2019-08-22Bibliographically approved
Buccolieri, R., Sandberg, M., Wigö, H. & Di Sabatino, S. (2019). The drag force distribution within regular arrays of cubes and its relation to cross ventilation – Theoretical and experimental analyses. Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics, 189, 91-103
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The drag force distribution within regular arrays of cubes and its relation to cross ventilation – Theoretical and experimental analyses
2019 (English)In: Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics, ISSN 0167-6105, E-ISSN 1872-8197, Vol. 189, p. 91-103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A novel set of wind tunnel measurements of the drag force and its spatial distribution along aligned arrays of cubes of height H and planar area index λ p (air gap between cubes) equal to 0.028 (5H) to 0.69 (0.2H) is presented and analysed. Two different types of measurements are compared: one type where the drag force is obtained using the standard load cell method, another type where the drag force is estimated by measuring the pressure difference between windward and the leeward façades. Results show that the drag force is nearly uniformly distributed for lower λ p (0.028 and 0.0625), it decreases up to 50% at the second row for λ p = 0.11, and it sharply decreases for larger λ p (from 0.25 to 0.69) where the force mostly acts on the first row. It follows that for the lowest λ p the drag force typically formulated as a drag area corresponds to the total frontal area of the array, whereas for large λ p the drag area corresponds to the area of the first row. By assessing the driving pressure for ventilation from the drag force, the analysis is extended to estimate the cross ventilation as an example of application of this type of measurements. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Cross ventilation, Cubic building arrays, Drag area, Drag distribution, Interference factor, Standard load cell, Geometry, Ventilation, Wind tunnels, Aligned arrays, Cubic building, Experimental analysis, Pressure differences, Standard loads, Wind tunnel measurements, Drag
National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30516 (URN)10.1016/j.jweia.2019.03.022 (DOI)000467392500008 ()2-s2.0-85064004026 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 689954
Available from: 2019-08-19 Created: 2019-08-19 Last updated: 2019-08-20Bibliographically approved
Ma, D., Omer, I., Osaragi, T., Sandberg, M. & Jiang, B. (2019). Why Topology Matters in Predicting Human Activities. Environment and Planning B: Urban Analytics and City Science, 46(7), 1297-1313
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why Topology Matters in Predicting Human Activities
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2019 (English)In: Environment and Planning B: Urban Analytics and City Science, ISSN 2399-8083, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 1297-1313Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Geographic space is best understood through the topological relationship of the underlying streets (note: entire streets rather than street segments), which enabales us to see scaling or fractal or living structure of far more less-connected streets than well-connected ones. It is this underlying scaling structure that makes human activities or urban traffic predictable, albeit in the sense of collective rather than individual human moving behavior. This power of topological analysis has not yet received its deserved attention in the literature, as many researchers continue to rely on segment analysis for predicting urban traffic. The segment-analysis-based methods are essentially geometric, with a focus on geometric details such as locations, lengths, and directions, and are unable to reveal the scaling property, which means they cannot be used for human activities prediction. We conducted a series of case studies using London streets and tweet location data, based on related concepts such as natural streets, and natural street segments (or street segments for short), axial lines, and axial line segments (or line segments for short). We found that natural streets are the best representation in terms of traffic prediction, followed by axial lines, and that neither street segments nor line segments bear a good correlation between network parameters and tweet locations. These findings point to the fact that the reason why axial lines-based space syntax, or the kind of topological analysis in general, works has little to do with individual human travel behavior or ways that human conceptualize distances or spaces. Instead, it is the underlying scaling hierarchy of streets – numerous least-connected, a very few most-connected, and some in between the least- and most-connected – that makes human activities or urban traffic predictable.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Topological analysis, space syntax, segment analysis, natural streets, scaling of geographic space
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26166 (URN)10.1177/2399808318792268 (DOI)000482057700007 ()2-s2.0-85052568351 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-02-18 Created: 2018-02-18 Last updated: 2019-09-05Bibliographically approved
Sandberg, M., Wigö, H. & Kabanshi, A. (2018). Is Building Ventilation a Process of Diluting Contaminants or Delivering Clean Air?. In: Risto Kosonen, Mervi Ahola and Jarkko Narvanne (Ed.), Excellent Indoor Climate and High Performing Ventilation: . Paper presented at Roomvent and Ventilation 2018, 2-5 June 2018, Aalto University, Espoo, Finland (pp. 253-258).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is Building Ventilation a Process of Diluting Contaminants or Delivering Clean Air?
2018 (English)In: Excellent Indoor Climate and High Performing Ventilation / [ed] Risto Kosonen, Mervi Ahola and Jarkko Narvanne, 2018, p. 253-258Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the paper is to discuss the performance of air distribution systems intended for dilution of contaminants and those intended for delivery of clean air to local regions within rooms. At first the systems are distinguished by their visiting frequency behaviour. The performance of the systems with respect to their possibility to influence the concentration due to contaminants is dealt with by the concept dilution capacity for mixing systems and by introduction of the concept delivery capacity for systems intended for delivery of clean air locally. Various ways of realizing systems for supply of clean air to regions within a room are presented and their pros and cons are discussed.  The most important single parameter is the entrainment of ambient air into the primary flow that drives the airflow in the room.   

Keywords
probability to return, visitation frequency, dilution capacity, delivery capacity, entrainment, mixing factor due to entrainment
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26850 (URN)978-952-5236-48-4 (ISBN)
Conference
Roomvent and Ventilation 2018, 2-5 June 2018, Aalto University, Espoo, Finland
Note

Digital, password-protected proceedings

Available from: 2018-06-07 Created: 2018-06-07 Last updated: 2018-06-11Bibliographically approved
Projects
A new ventilation technique based on velocity variation as a method to improve thermal comfort and ventilation efficiency [2008-64_Formas]; University of GävleTowards an optimisation of urban-planning and architectural parameters for energy use minimisation in miditerranean cities [2008-327_Formas]; University of Gävle; Publications
Sandberg, M., Neophytou, M., Fokaides, P., Panagiotou, I., Ioannou, I., Petrou, M., . . . Ivanov, A. (2011). Towards optimization of urban planning and architectural parameters for energy use minimization in Mediterranean cities. In: WREC 2011: . Paper presented at The Word Renewable Energy Congress 2011, Linköping 8-13 May 2011.
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