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Frelin, Anneli, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1871-4488
Publications (10 of 101) Show all publications
Grannäs, J. & Frelin, A. (2020). Safe and unsafe school environments through the eyes of the students. In: Anna Kristín Sigurðardóttir, Gonçalo Canto Moniz, Pamela Woolner, Ulrike Stadler-Altmann (Ed.), Understanding European School Buildings: Policies, People and Practices. Bad Heilbrunn: Verlag Julius Klinkhardt
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Safe and unsafe school environments through the eyes of the students
2020 (English)In: Understanding European School Buildings: Policies, People and Practices / [ed] Anna Kristín Sigurðardóttir, Gonçalo Canto Moniz, Pamela Woolner, Ulrike Stadler-Altmann, Bad Heilbrunn: Verlag Julius Klinkhardt, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bad Heilbrunn: Verlag Julius Klinkhardt, 2020
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29148 (URN)
Note

In submission

Available from: 2019-01-22 Created: 2019-01-22 Last updated: 2019-02-13Bibliographically approved
Frelin, A. (2019). Comparisons Across Borders: The Professional Territories of Teachers and Social Pedagogues. In: : . Paper presented at NERA 2019, 6-8 March 2019, Uppsala, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparisons Across Borders: The Professional Territories of Teachers and Social Pedagogues
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29368 (URN)
Conference
NERA 2019, 6-8 March 2019, Uppsala, Sweden
Available from: 2019-03-10 Created: 2019-03-10 Last updated: 2019-03-11Bibliographically approved
Frelin, A. & Grannäs, J. (2019). Konflikthantering i skolan: Ett ekologiskt perspektiv. In: Pihlgren, Ann (Ed.), Skolans konflikter: . Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Konflikthantering i skolan: Ett ekologiskt perspektiv
2019 (Swedish)In: Skolans konflikter / [ed] Pihlgren, Ann, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29147 (URN)
Note

In press

Available from: 2019-01-22 Created: 2019-01-22 Last updated: 2019-02-13Bibliographically approved
Frelin, A. & Grannäs, J. (2019). Teachers’ pedagogical conceptions of a planned activity based learning environment. In: : . Paper presented at NERA 2019, 6-8 March 2019, Uppsala, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teachers’ pedagogical conceptions of a planned activity based learning environment
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29369 (URN)
Conference
NERA 2019, 6-8 March 2019, Uppsala, Sweden
Funder
VINNOVA, 2017-02146
Available from: 2019-03-10 Created: 2019-03-10 Last updated: 2019-03-11Bibliographically approved
Frelin, A. & Grannäs, J. (2018). Changing school environments through the eyes of the students. In: AERA abstract repository: . Paper presented at AERA Annual Meeting 2018, 13-17 April 2018, New York, NY, USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changing school environments through the eyes of the students
2018 (English)In: AERA abstract repository, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

1. Purpose This paper draws on socio-material and spatial theories to open up new possibilities for understanding how school practices are in play: the interior of the school buildings, the outside playground and different artefacts being part of the school environment. More specifically, we have used a spatial perspective for analyzing students’ photo stories describing spaces that supports and impede their learning as well as safe and unsafe spaces in a newly opened school.

2. Theoretical framework In discussions about educational practices, cognitive, social and cultural concepts tend to dominate. These concepts are often based on notions about humans using various kinds of tools and that social interaction is played out in a context. Notions like this can easily obscure the significance of material objects (Fenwick, Edwards, & Sawchuk, 2011). A sociomaterial perspective entails viewing interactions in school as more than social processes, but materializing processes in and with material objects. This involves envisioning, enacting and experiencing education in relation to its material, social and discursive aspects (Mulcahy, Cleveland, & Aberton, 2015). Stables (2015) argues that there is a need to regard the school environment as “part of the life story of its users”. School environments are appropriated by their users who respond to their environment in different ways.

3. Methods The case school, Maple Grove, is a newly opened secondary school. The fieldwork was conducted over the course of one school year (Yin, 2009). The main data used in this paper consists of students’ photo stories. According to Banks (2007), visual research methods are appropriate for the study of youth and their contexts.

4. Data sources Digital stories (using the software Sway) was collected by means of classroom assignments. Combinations of images (photographs, screenshots etc.) and texts supported the socio-material analysis.

5. Results Preliminary results show variations in both the areas that students view as safe and unsafe, and the reasons for their choice of area. This means that one area may be depicted as safe by one student, but unsafe by another. They also pointed to various social and physical features that affected their learning environment. Students also point out vital places in school buildings that neither architects nor school staff could foresee in the original design.

6. Conclusion A conclusion that can be drawn is that the school administration and staff need to be sensitive to the views of the students in the transition from design to dynamic practice.

National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26990 (URN)
Conference
AERA Annual Meeting 2018, 13-17 April 2018, New York, NY, USA
Available from: 2018-06-13 Created: 2018-06-13 Last updated: 2019-01-31Bibliographically approved
Frelin, A. & Fransson, G. (2018). Principals’ experiences of changed relationships withnewly qualified teachers during the teacher registration reform. International Journal of Educational Management
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Principals’ experiences of changed relationships withnewly qualified teachers during the teacher registration reform
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Educational Management, ISSN 0951-354X, E-ISSN 1758-6518Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26987 (URN)
Funder
AFA Insurance
Available from: 2018-06-13 Created: 2018-06-13 Last updated: 2019-02-19Bibliographically approved
Frelin, A. & Quiles-Fernández, E. (2018). Professional border territories: A cross-country understanding of social educators and pedagogues in the school landscape. In: : . Paper presented at Invisible College 2018, 12th April 2018, New York, NY, USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Professional border territories: A cross-country understanding of social educators and pedagogues in the school landscape
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This proposal outlines a cross-country conversation about the social dimensions of pedagogical work. Through our work being alongside a Swedish social pedagogue and a Spanish social educator, we begin to ponder about the border territories that social pedagogy holds in different contexts, times and places.

As we know, professions provide important services to the society based on discretionary work that requires university based training and licensing (e.g. Evetts, 2009). In our educational field, the professionals dealing with social pedagogy vary from country to country. For example, due to the social needs that appeared in Spain in the 90s, the Ministry of Education created a university degree called Social Education. However, before that, social educators worked in non-regulated educational spaces. Professionalizing their role allowed them to start a relational work with children, youth, families, teachers, social workers, social services, and doctors, with social well-being goals. The curriculum that those university programs offer relates to schooling processes, social development, and family matters. This means that, holistically, social educators are able to work in several education communities, crossing borders and building bridges, offering possibilities that have not considered it in the past by their participants. Possibilities that usually are seeing as ‘the path for a better life’.

In Sweden, social workers have traditionally taken care of the more severe social and welfare issues, whereas teachers have had responsibility for pastoral care and other less severe relational problems. Recently, in response to a growing teacher shortage in most Nordic countries, and calls to ‘let teachers be teachers’, a new para-professional group with a social pedagogue non-university degree or comparable occupational training have become more common in schools. 

Thinking with both realities, and attending the three narrative inquiry dimensions, we have puzzled about which spaces do social educators/social pedagogues appropriate inside and outside of school, what do they perceive to be their task to perform, what do they leave to others, and with whom do they interact. All those wonders have created our research puzzle: what negotiations happen in the professional border territories, or spaces in-between, and how can we understand the dynamic inter-professional educational work landscapes in different countries?

In order to trace some emerging professional boundaries and potential boundary crossings between teachers and social educators/social pedagogues, our discussion is nested in the notion of professional territory, which consists of the professionals’ conceived task perception, the social transaction and the appropriated physical space where interaction takes place (Grannäs & Frelin, 2017).

National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26192 (URN)
Conference
Invisible College 2018, 12th April 2018, New York, NY, USA
Available from: 2018-02-28 Created: 2018-02-28 Last updated: 2019-02-04Bibliographically approved
Frelin, A. & Alterator, S. (2018). Professional border territory negotiations between teachers and social pedagogues – a case study. In: NERA 2018 - 46th Congress: Educational Research: Boundaries, Breaches and Bridges: Abstracts. Paper presented at NERA 2018, 46th Congress of the Nordic Educational Research Association (NERA), 8-10 March 2018, Oslo, Norway (pp. 424).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Professional border territory negotiations between teachers and social pedagogues – a case study
2018 (English)In: NERA 2018 - 46th Congress: Educational Research: Boundaries, Breaches and Bridges: Abstracts, 2018, p. 424-Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In response to a growing teacher shortage in most Nordic countries, and calls to “let teachers be teachers”, other professional groups with varying backgrounds and training are being introduced in schools. This measure is expected to let teachers focus primarily on core tasks, for example teaching and grading, and leave more peripheral tasks to members of other professional groups. In everyday practices, such changes in their professional work environment entails, to some extent, professional boundary negotiations. This paper examines such negotiations in a case study, in order to trace some emerging professional boundaries and potential boundary crossings between teachers and so called social pedagogues.

Professions provide important services to the society based on discretionary work that requires university based training and licensing (e.g. Evetts, 2009). In Sweden, focus has been placed on formal grading as the most apparent task over which only teachers have jurisdiction, which is also in line with an increased focus on accountability in schools (Englund & Solbrekke, 2015). Professional action in education has been analysed using the concept of professional territory, which consists of the school staff's conceived task perception, the social transactionand the appropriated physical space where interaction takes place (Grannäs & Frelin, 2017).

A case study was conducted in a newly built primary school (grades F-6). The staff teams consisted of three teachers and one social pedagogue responsible for around 90 students. The social pedagogues had occupational training although not a university degree. Three school visits and four interviews with two primary teachers and two social pedagogues were conducted. For this paper, interviews with a teacher and a social pedagogue working in the same team were analysed with attention to instances of negotiation and blurred boundaries, here conceptualized as professional border territories.

Preliminary results: In the first year in operation of the school, the teachers and social pedagogues have had to negotiate continuously, as situations have emerged in the professional territory. This regards for example the matter of who should “check in” the students in the department in the morning. The time and place just before classes start can thus be viewed as one professional border territory. Another such territory is during seat work, when the social pedagogue tried to steer clear of helping students with their work and tend to matters of order. A third is during emergent conflicts, where the person who was present first, either the teacher or the social pedagogue, attended to the matter even if this was the social pedagogue’s task. When new professional groups enter schools their potential contribution to the educational environment, along with the risks that may ensue for educational relationships, need investigation.

References:

Englund, Tomas, & Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal. (2015). Om innebörder i lärarprofessionalism. Pedagogisk Forskning i Sverige, 20(3-4), 168-194.

Evetts, Julia. (2009). New Professionalism and New Public Management: Changes, Continuities and Consequences. Comparative Sociology, 8(2), 247-266. doi: 10.1163/156913309x421655

Grannäs, Jan, & Frelin, Anneli. (2017). Spaces of student support -comparing educational environments from two time periods. Improving schools, 20(2), 127-142

National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25795 (URN)
Conference
NERA 2018, 46th Congress of the Nordic Educational Research Association (NERA), 8-10 March 2018, Oslo, Norway
Available from: 2017-12-14 Created: 2017-12-14 Last updated: 2019-02-04Bibliographically approved
Frelin, A. & Wistrand, A. (2018). Professionalitet under press: Lärares arbete bland restträsk, pappersfloder och medkänslomalströmmar (1ed.). In: Sara Irisdotter Aldenmyr (Ed.), Läraren och yrkesetiken: (pp. 106-124). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Professionalitet under press: Lärares arbete bland restträsk, pappersfloder och medkänslomalströmmar
2018 (Swedish)In: Läraren och yrkesetiken / [ed] Sara Irisdotter Aldenmyr, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, 1, p. 106-124Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [sv]

Dagens ämneslärare möter en mängd utmaningar i vardagen, vilket innebär att det vissa gånger kan kännas tungt att arbeta som lärare. De upplevelserna delas av många inom lärarprofessionen, och har orsaker som ofta ligger utanför det som direkt går att påverka. Har de yrkesetiska principerna potential att hjälpa till att hantera den professionella pressen och i så fall hur?

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018 Edition: 1
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25573 (URN)9789144120881 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-11-22 Created: 2017-11-22 Last updated: 2019-02-25Bibliographically approved
Frelin, A. & Grannäs, J. (2017). Changing school environments through the eyes of the students. In: : . Paper presented at NERA 2017, The 45th Congress of the Nordic Educational Research Association (NERA) 'Learning and education – material conditions and consequences', 23-25 March 2017, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changing school environments through the eyes of the students
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper draws on socio-material and spatial theories to open up new possibilities for understanding how school practices are in play: the interior of the school buildings, the outside playground and different artefacts being part of the school environment. The purpose of this case study is to enhance our understanding of different students’ views of their educational environment, inside and outside of the classroom. The focus lies on their experiences of safe and unsafe places, along with spaces that supports and impede their learning. More specifically, we have used a spatial perspective for analyzing students’ photo stories in a newly opened school.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23855 (URN)
Conference
NERA 2017, The 45th Congress of the Nordic Educational Research Association (NERA) 'Learning and education – material conditions and consequences', 23-25 March 2017, Copenhagen, Denmark
Projects
Hur byggs en hållbar utbildningsmiljö upp?
Note

Contribution to the symposium Changing Design of School Environment is Changing Education - Changing processes through the eyes of the stakeholders Part 2

Available from: 2017-04-06 Created: 2017-04-06 Last updated: 2019-01-31Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1871-4488

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