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Frelin, Anneli, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1871-4488
Publications (10 of 97) Show all publications
Frelin, A. & Grannäs, J. (2018). Changing school environments through the eyes of the students. In: AERA abstract repository: . Paper presented at AERA Annual Meeting 2018, 13-17 April 2018, New York, NY, USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changing school environments through the eyes of the students
2018 (English)In: AERA abstract repository, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

1. Purpose This paper draws on socio-material and spatial theories to open up new possibilities for understanding how school practices are in play: the interior of the school buildings, the outside playground and different artefacts being part of the school environment. More specifically, we have used a spatial perspective for analyzing students’ photo stories describing spaces that supports and impede their learning as well as safe and unsafe spaces in a newly opened school.

2. Theoretical framework In discussions about educational practices, cognitive, social and cultural concepts tend to dominate. These concepts are often based on notions about humans using various kinds of tools and that social interaction is played out in a context. Notions like this can easily obscure the significance of material objects (Fenwick, Edwards, & Sawchuk, 2011). A sociomaterial perspective entails viewing interactions in school as more than social processes, but materializing processes in and with material objects. This involves envisioning, enacting and experiencing education in relation to its material, social and discursive aspects (Mulcahy, Cleveland, & Aberton, 2015). Stables (2015) argues that there is a need to regard the school environment as “part of the life story of its users”. School environments are appropriated by their users who respond to their environment in different ways.

3. Methods The case school, Maple Grove, is a newly opened secondary school. The fieldwork was conducted over the course of one school year (Yin, 2009). The main data used in this paper consists of students’ photo stories. According to Banks (2007), visual research methods are appropriate for the study of youth and their contexts.

4. Data sources Digital stories (using the software Sway) was collected by means of classroom assignments. Combinations of images (photographs, screenshots etc.) and texts supported the socio-material analysis.

5. Results Preliminary results show variations in both the areas that students view as safe and unsafe, and the reasons for their choice of area. This means that one area may be depicted as safe by one student, but unsafe by another. They also pointed to various social and physical features that affected their learning environment. Students also point out vital places in school buildings that neither architects nor school staff could foresee in the original design.

6. Conclusion A conclusion that can be drawn is that the school administration and staff need to be sensitive to the views of the students in the transition from design to dynamic practice.

National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26990 (URN)
Conference
AERA Annual Meeting 2018, 13-17 April 2018, New York, NY, USA
Available from: 2018-06-13 Created: 2018-06-13 Last updated: 2018-06-18Bibliographically approved
Frelin, A. & Fransson, G. (2018). Principals’ experiences of changed relationships withnewly qualified teachers during the teacher registration reform. International Journal of Educational Management
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Principals’ experiences of changed relationships withnewly qualified teachers during the teacher registration reform
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Educational Management, ISSN 0951-354X, E-ISSN 1758-6518Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26987 (URN)
Funder
AFA Insurance
Available from: 2018-06-13 Created: 2018-06-13 Last updated: 2018-06-18Bibliographically approved
Frelin, A. & Quiles-Fernández, E. (2018). Professional border territories: A cross-country understanding of social educators and pedagogues in the school landscape. In: : . Paper presented at Invisible College 2018, 12th April 2018, New York, NY, USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Professional border territories: A cross-country understanding of social educators and pedagogues in the school landscape
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This proposal outlines a cross-country conversation about the social dimensions of pedagogical work. Through our work being alongside a Swedish social pedagogue and a Spanish social educator, we begin to ponder about the border territories that social pedagogy holds in different contexts, times and places.

As we know, professions provide important services to the society based on discretionary work that requires university based training and licensing (e.g. Evetts, 2009). In our educational field, the professionals dealing with social pedagogy vary from country to country. For example, due to the social needs that appeared in Spain in the 90s, the Ministry of Education created a university degree called Social Education. However, before that, social educators worked in non-regulated educational spaces. Professionalizing their role allowed them to start a relational work with children, youth, families, teachers, social workers, social services, and doctors, with social well-being goals. The curriculum that those university programs offer relates to schooling processes, social development, and family matters. This means that, holistically, social educators are able to work in several education communities, crossing borders and building bridges, offering possibilities that have not considered it in the past by their participants. Possibilities that usually are seeing as ‘the path for a better life’.

In Sweden, social workers have traditionally taken care of the more severe social and welfare issues, whereas teachers have had responsibility for pastoral care and other less severe relational problems. Recently, in response to a growing teacher shortage in most Nordic countries, and calls to ‘let teachers be teachers’, a new para-professional group with a social pedagogue non-university degree or comparable occupational training have become more common in schools. 

Thinking with both realities, and attending the three narrative inquiry dimensions, we have puzzled about which spaces do social educators/social pedagogues appropriate inside and outside of school, what do they perceive to be their task to perform, what do they leave to others, and with whom do they interact. All those wonders have created our research puzzle: what negotiations happen in the professional border territories, or spaces in-between, and how can we understand the dynamic inter-professional educational work landscapes in different countries?

In order to trace some emerging professional boundaries and potential boundary crossings between teachers and social educators/social pedagogues, our discussion is nested in the notion of professional territory, which consists of the professionals’ conceived task perception, the social transaction and the appropriated physical space where interaction takes place (Grannäs & Frelin, 2017).

National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26192 (URN)
Conference
Invisible College 2018, 12th April 2018, New York, NY, USA
Available from: 2018-02-28 Created: 2018-02-28 Last updated: 2018-06-18Bibliographically approved
Frelin, A. & Alterator, S. (2018). Professional border territory negotiations between teachers and social pedagogues – a case study. In: NERA 2018 - 46th Congress: Educational Research: Boundaries, Breaches and Bridges: Abstracts. Paper presented at NERA 2018, 46th Congress of the Nordic Educational Research Association (NERA), 8-10 March 2018, Oslo, Norway (pp. 424).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Professional border territory negotiations between teachers and social pedagogues – a case study
2018 (English)In: NERA 2018 - 46th Congress: Educational Research: Boundaries, Breaches and Bridges: Abstracts, 2018, p. 424-Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In response to a growing teacher shortage in most Nordic countries, and calls to “let teachers be teachers”, other professional groups with varying backgrounds and training are being introduced in schools. This measure is expected to let teachers focus primarily on core tasks, for example teaching and grading, and leave more peripheral tasks to members of other professional groups. In everyday practices, such changes in their professional work environment entails, to some extent, professional boundary negotiations. This paper examines such negotiations in a case study, in order to trace some emerging professional boundaries and potential boundary crossings between teachers and so called social pedagogues.

Professions provide important services to the society based on discretionary work that requires university based training and licensing (e.g. Evetts, 2009). In Sweden, focus has been placed on formal grading as the most apparent task over which only teachers have jurisdiction, which is also in line with an increased focus on accountability in schools (Englund & Solbrekke, 2015). Professional action in education has been analysed using the concept of professional territory, which consists of the school staff's conceived task perception, the social transactionand the appropriated physical space where interaction takes place (Grannäs & Frelin, 2017).

A case study was conducted in a newly built primary school (grades F-6). The staff teams consisted of three teachers and one social pedagogue responsible for around 90 students. The social pedagogues had occupational training although not a university degree. Three school visits and four interviews with two primary teachers and two social pedagogues were conducted. For this paper, interviews with a teacher and a social pedagogue working in the same team were analysed with attention to instances of negotiation and blurred boundaries, here conceptualized as professional border territories.

Preliminary results: In the first year in operation of the school, the teachers and social pedagogues have had to negotiate continuously, as situations have emerged in the professional territory. This regards for example the matter of who should “check in” the students in the department in the morning. The time and place just before classes start can thus be viewed as one professional border territory. Another such territory is during seat work, when the social pedagogue tried to steer clear of helping students with their work and tend to matters of order. A third is during emergent conflicts, where the person who was present first, either the teacher or the social pedagogue, attended to the matter even if this was the social pedagogue’s task. When new professional groups enter schools their potential contribution to the educational environment, along with the risks that may ensue for educational relationships, need investigation.

References:

Englund, Tomas, & Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal. (2015). Om innebörder i lärarprofessionalism. Pedagogisk Forskning i Sverige, 20(3-4), 168-194.

Evetts, Julia. (2009). New Professionalism and New Public Management: Changes, Continuities and Consequences. Comparative Sociology, 8(2), 247-266. doi: 10.1163/156913309x421655

Grannäs, Jan, & Frelin, Anneli. (2017). Spaces of student support -comparing educational environments from two time periods. Improving schools, 20(2), 127-142

National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25795 (URN)
Conference
NERA 2018, 46th Congress of the Nordic Educational Research Association (NERA), 8-10 March 2018, Oslo, Norway
Available from: 2017-12-14 Created: 2017-12-14 Last updated: 2018-06-18Bibliographically approved
Frelin, A. & Wistrand, A. (2018). Professionalitet under press: Lärares arbete bland restträsk, pappersfloder och medkänslomalströmmar. In: Sara Irisdotter Aldenmyr (Ed.), Läraren och yrkesetiken: . Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Professionalitet under press: Lärares arbete bland restträsk, pappersfloder och medkänslomalströmmar
2018 (Swedish)In: Läraren och yrkesetiken / [ed] Sara Irisdotter Aldenmyr, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [sv]

Dagens ämneslärare möter en mängd utmaningar i vardagen, vilket innebär att det vissa gånger kan kännas tungt att arbeta som lärare. De upplevelserna delas av många inom lärarprofessionen, och har orsaker som ofta ligger utanför det som direkt går att påverka. Har de yrkesetiska principerna potential att hjälpa till att hantera den professionella pressen och i så fall hur?

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018
National Category
Educational Sciences Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25573 (URN)
Note

In press

Available from: 2017-11-22 Created: 2017-11-22 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Frelin, A. & Grannäs, J. (2017). Changing school environments through the eyes of the students. In: : . Paper presented at NERA 2017, The 45th Congress of the Nordic Educational Research Association (NERA) 'Learning and education – material conditions and consequences', 23-25 March 2017, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changing school environments through the eyes of the students
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper draws on socio-material and spatial theories to open up new possibilities for understanding how school practices are in play: the interior of the school buildings, the outside playground and different artefacts being part of the school environment. The purpose of this case study is to enhance our understanding of different students’ views of their educational environment, inside and outside of the classroom. The focus lies on their experiences of safe and unsafe places, along with spaces that supports and impede their learning. More specifically, we have used a spatial perspective for analyzing students’ photo stories in a newly opened school.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23855 (URN)
Conference
NERA 2017, The 45th Congress of the Nordic Educational Research Association (NERA) 'Learning and education – material conditions and consequences', 23-25 March 2017, Copenhagen, Denmark
Projects
Hur byggs en hållbar utbildningsmiljö upp?
Note

Contribution to the symposium Changing Design of School Environment is Changing Education - Changing processes through the eyes of the stakeholders Part 2

Available from: 2017-04-06 Created: 2017-04-06 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Rytivaara, A. & Frelin, A. (2017). Committed to trouble: Learning from teachers’ stories of challenging yet rewarding teacher-student relationships. Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies, 68, 12-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Committed to trouble: Learning from teachers’ stories of challenging yet rewarding teacher-student relationships
2017 (English)In: Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies, ISSN 0742-051X, E-ISSN 1879-2480, Vol. 68, p. 12-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Teacher-student relationships are vital for student learning, yet they can be experienced as a burden by teachers and cause teacher attrition. This paper is based on the stories of six teachers who gave accounts of relationships with students that, counterintuitively, were both problematic and positive. Narrative analysis was applied to these accounts in order to disentangle the complexities of teaching and better understand what factors led the teachers to find the challenge of difficult teacher-student relationships ultimately rewarding.

Keywords
commitment, teacher-student relationships, teacher emotions, narrative
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-24784 (URN)10.1016/j.tate.2017.08.004 (DOI)000414824100002 ()2-s2.0-85027710490 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Väg-skäl
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-5993
Note

Ytterligare finansiär:

Faculty of Education, University of Tampere

Available from: 2017-08-02 Created: 2017-08-02 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Frelin, A. (2017). Enacting democratic relations in everyday teaching: comparing teachers’ practices from preschool to high school. Citizenship Teaching and Learning, 12(3), 341-353
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enacting democratic relations in everyday teaching: comparing teachers’ practices from preschool to high school
2017 (English)In: Citizenship Teaching and Learning, ISSN 1751-1917, E-ISSN 1751-1925, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 341-353Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In democratic societies fostering democratic citizens is an important goal of education and  includes experience of democratic relations. But how do teachers interpret and carry this out? Are there differences between the levels of schooling, and if so, what? In an explorative study, interviews with teachers from preschool to high school were conducted and analyzed to elicit practical arguments (Fenstermacher and Richardson, 1993). The informants described their mission as intertwined in everyday activities and teaching democracy ‘as a way of life’ in the spirit of Dewey. For example, the task of fostering quality in relations, such as empathy, was only discussed by preschool teachers, whereas the task of balancing equal relationships was addressed by all the informants at all levels. It also became clear that the progression of democratic learning runs parallel with addressing ever-present relational issues of a democratic nature.

Keywords
democratic citizens, democratic learning, democratic relationships, professional responsibility, teaching, teacher professionalism
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23857 (URN)10.1386/ctl.12.3.341_1 (DOI)2-s2.0-85040904693 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-04-06 Created: 2017-04-06 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Fransson, G., Frelin, A. & Grannäs, J. (2017). Exploring a conceptual framework to understand how principals balance the partly contradictory tasks of evaluating and supporting newly qualified teachers. In: : . Paper presented at The European Conference on Educational Research (ECER2017), 22-25 August 2017, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring a conceptual framework to understand how principals balance the partly contradictory tasks of evaluating and supporting newly qualified teachers
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In many countries it is argued that the “quality of teachers” is the most important school-related factor in pupils’ learning (Hattie, 2009; 2012). Teacher quality has become a key argument for teachers’ professional development. When it comes to newly qualified teachers (NQTs), in many countries the call for “teacher quality” has either led to reforms that support NQTs or reforms requiring an evaluation of their competence. In some countries these approaches are combined, with induction systems and mentoring that support NQTs and an evaluation of their skills to ensure quality. However, some research suggests that if the same person performs both roles it is more difficult to create and maintain a relationship based on confidence, openness and mutual trust that promotes risk-free learning (Author 1, 201*, Jones 2009). In some countries or states mentors perform both these roles (cf. Yusko & Feiman Nemser, 2008), whereas in others these two roles are separated so that mentors support and principals evaluate.

The latter kind of system was introduced in Sweden in 2011, with mentors supporting NQTs and principals performing the evaluation (Government Bill, 2010/11). However, previous research shows that when the Swedish principals performed the assessment they also supported the NQTs (Author 1, Author 2, Author 3, 201*) in that they partly applied an instructional leadership (cf. REF) and gave post-observation feedback. However, being both an evaluator and supervisor can be challenging. For instance, Hinchey (2010) claims that teachers only improve their practice in relatively non-threatening contexts and that the assessment may challenge this (cf. Author 1, 201*; Range, Young & Hvidstone, 2013).

A review of the research literature reveals that there is an urgent need for theoretical development in order to understand how principals enact and balance their roles as evaluators of NQTs and pedagogical leaders. In responding to this call, the purpose of the paper is: (a) to elaborate and discuss a conceptual framework that captures how principals enact and balance their roles as evaluators and pedagogical leaders in the context of evaluating NQTs and (b) to exemplify how data can be related to the framework.

Theoretical framework

The emphasis on and combination of supportive and evaluative dimensions are contained in the framework of a four-way table that includes “formal and structured evaluation” vs. “informal evaluation” and  “strong instructional leadership” vs. “weak instructional leadership”.

The evaluation dimension is defined as the extent to which evaluations are scheduled, planned, directed by guiding formulae, how the different issues of the national standards are focused, time spent on the evaluation, the structure and focus of the follow-up discussions etc.   

The instructional dimension is defined as how and how much guidance is given and how the NQTs professional development are facilitated. Here the focus is on guidance and feedback that contribute to developing the instructional skills or pedagogical thinking of the NQT. Positive feedback relates to the content included in the table. Positive feedback in a general sense, without connection to instruction, thinking or a situation, is not included. For instance, positive feedback heard in the corridor, such as: ‘colleagues say you perform well’, is not included in this dimension. Guidance can be absent or present, more or less extensive, or constructive and detailed.

Methods/methodology

The framework is developed by reviewing the research literature in the areas of teacher induction (cf. (Hobson, Ashby, Malderez, & Tomlinson, 2009), evaluation of NQTs (cf. Yusko & Feiman Nemser, 2008) and principals’ instructional leadership (cf. Neumerski, 2013; LaPointe Terosky, 2016). Most of the literature relating to principals’ instructional leadership focuses on teachers in general and not specifically NQTs (cf. Tuytens & Devos, 2017), but is nevertheless valuable.

Drawing on and combining supportive and evaluative dimensions result in a four-way table framework with the following axes:  “formal and structured evaluation” vs. “informal evaluation” and “strong instructional leadership” vs. “weak instructional leadership”.

This framework is then used in explorative analyses of data from a longitudinal research project in which five principals conducting a formal evaluation of NQTs are followed in the year of the evaluation. These five principals are regarded as cases. The NQTs being evaluated teach Years 4-6.

Each principal is interviewed at least twice during the year (in total between 73-158 minutes), which forms the main data for the analysis. The interviews and analysis explore principals’ self-reported information regarding their strategies to enact and balance their role as evaluators and the support they provide. Using the software NVivo, codes are created based on content analysis (Miles, Huberman & Saldaña, 2014).

Self-reported data needs to be looked at critically (Podsakoff, MacKenzie, Lee, & Podsakoff, 2003). To validate this kind of data: (i) observations and recordings of post-observation conversations (tot. 72 minutes) are performed with two of the principals (A and C) and their NQTs, (ii) joint interviews are conducted with three principals (A, C and E) and their NQTs (in total 130 minutes) and (iii) observations of three of the principals’ observations (B, C, D) are carried out. A coherent design of these validating strategies is not possible due to ethical and practical reasons. Three of the NQTs did not feel comfortable with the participation of an external researcher during the observations and/or post-observation conversations. Some of the planned observations were cancelled due to illness, the unavailability of the informant or were performed ad hoc and informally and were not observed or recorded.

Expected outcomes/results

Positioning the principals in the framework of the four-way table with the axes “formal and structured evaluation” vs. “informal evaluation” and “strong instructional leadership” vs. “weak instructional leadership” enables their actions to be positioned differently. Four out of the five teachers are positioned more towards “strong instructional leadership” and “formal and structured evaluation”, albeit with different emphases on the two dimensions. The fifth principal (E) is positioned more towards “informal evaluation” and “weak instructional leadership”. This principal describes his/her leadership as ‘leadership on the run’.

The overall conclusion is that the theoretical framework enables principals to be positioned according to how their evaluative and supportive roles vary. Also, the quality of the data, for instance with regard to quantity, focus on relevant issues and different kinds of data (e.g. self-reported narratives, narratives from other actors such as NQTs, and first-hand information from the researchers’ direct observations) gives a much more informed analysis of the positioning in the framework. However, in this small-scale study, the different kinds of data do not contradict each other, but strengthen the conclusions and the positioning.

Thus, the framework facilitates an understanding of how principals facilitate NQTs professional development in a context in which evaluative and supportive dimensions are applied. The framework could also be used to analyse how mentors balance the supportive and evaluative dimensions.

References

Author 1 (201*). [details removed for peer review]. Article published in international peer-reviewed journal.

Author 1, Author 2 & Author 3 (201*). [details removed for peer review]. Paper presented at an International Annual Conference.

Government bill 2010/11:20 Legitimation för lärare och förskollärare [Registration for Teachers and Pre-School Teachers]. The Swedish Government.

 Hattie, J. 2009. Visible learning: a synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. London: New York: Routledge.

Hattie, J. (2012). Visible learning for teachers: maximizing impact on learning. London: Routledge.

Hinchey, P.H. (2010). Getting teacher assessment right: What policymakers can learn from research. Boulder, CO: National Education Policy Center.

Hobson, A. J., Ashby, P., Malderez, A., & Tomlinson, P. D. (2009). Mentoring beginning teachers: what we know and what we don't. Teaching and Teacher Education, 25(1), 207-216.

Jones, M. (2009). Supporting the supporters of novice teachers: An analysis of mentors’ needs from twelve European countries presented from an English perspective. Research in Comparative and International Education 4, no. 1: 4–21.

LaPointe Terosky, A. (2016): Enacting instructional leadership: perspectives and actions of public K-12 principals, School Leadership & Management,

Miles, M.B., Huberman, A.M. & Saldaña, J. (2014). Qualitative data analysis: a methods sourcebook. (3. ed.) Los Angeles: Sage.

Neumerski, C. M. (2013). Rethinking Instructional Leadership: A Review of What Do We Know About Principal, Teacher, and Coach Instructional Leadership, and Where Should We Go from Here? Educational Administration Quarterly 49 (2): 310–347.

Podsakoff, P. M., MacKenzie, S. B., Lee, J.-Y., & Podsakoff, N. P. (2003). Common method biases in behavioral research: A critical review of the literature and recommended remedies. Journal of Applied Psychology, 88, 879–903. 

Range, B. G., Young, S. & Hvidston, D. (2013) Teacher perceptions about observation conferences: what do teachers think about their formative supervision in one US school district?, School Leadership & Management, 33:1, 61-77.

Tuytens, M. & Devos, G. (2017) The role of feedback from the school

leader during teacher evaluation for teacher and school improvement, Teachers and Teaching, 23:1, 6-24,

Yusko, B., & Feiman Nemser. S. (2008). Embracing contraries: Combining assistance and assessment in new teacher induction. Teacher College Record 110, no. 5: 923–53.

National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25228 (URN)
Conference
The European Conference on Educational Research (ECER2017), 22-25 August 2017, Copenhagen, Denmark
Projects
RAOL-projektet (Rektors arbete och lämplighetsprövning av ny lärare)
Funder
AFA Insurance, 120292
Available from: 2017-09-13 Created: 2017-09-13 Last updated: 2018-07-03Bibliographically approved
Frelin, A. & Grannäs, J. (2017). Exploring the Support Function ”School Host” as Equalizer of Educational Opportunity in the School Environment. In: : . Paper presented at 2017 AERA Annual Meeting, 27 April - 1 May, 2017, San Antonio, TX, USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the Support Function ”School Host” as Equalizer of Educational Opportunity in the School Environment
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper a spatial perspective is used to explore the support work of school hosts in the common areas of the school environment aimed at equalizing educational opportunities and preventing social exclusion. Recent investments in student support staff are aimed at improving student care and boosting students’ academic performances. Interviews from two case schools, complemented by observations and documents, were compared in order to determine how the hosts relate to physical, conceived and social spaces in schools. Results show ways in which spatial aspects such as the physical layout of the school enable or limit their work. Their actions are the outcome of the relations between the school environment and their task perceptions. Moreover, they draw upon established relationships.

Keywords
Desegregation, Equity, School culture, School organization, Social context, Learning environment
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-22691 (URN)
Conference
2017 AERA Annual Meeting, 27 April - 1 May, 2017, San Antonio, TX, USA
Projects
Hur byggs en hållbar utbildningsmiljö upp?
Note

Pilotprojekt som finansierats med rektorsmedel.

Available from: 2016-11-03 Created: 2016-11-03 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1871-4488

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