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Sörqvist, Patrik, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7584-2275
Publications (10 of 111) Show all publications
Kabanshi, A., Yang, B., Sörqvist, P. & Sandberg, M. (2019). Occupants’ perception of air movements and air quality in a simulated classroom with an intermittent air supply system. Indoor + Built Environment, 28(1), 63-76
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupants’ perception of air movements and air quality in a simulated classroom with an intermittent air supply system
2019 (English)In: Indoor + Built Environment, ISSN 1420-326X, E-ISSN 1423-0070, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 63-76Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study reported herein builds on occupant response to an intermittent air jet strategy (IAJS), which creates periodic airflow and non-isothermal conditions in the occupied zone.  Previous research has highlighted the benefits of IAJS on thermal climate and supports energy saving potential in view of human thermal perception of the indoor environment. In this study, the goal was to explore occupant acceptability of air movements and perceived indoor air quality, and to determine a way of assessing acceptable air movement conditions under IAJS. Thirty-six participants were exposed to twelve conditions: three room air temperatures (nominal: 22.5, 25.5 and 28.5 oC), each with varied air speeds (nominal: <0.15 m/s under mixing ventilation (MV), and 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 m/s under IAJS) measured at the breathing height (1.1 m). The results show that participants preferred low air movements at lower temperatures and high air movements at higher temperatures. A model to predict percentage satisfied with intermittent air movements was developed, and predicts that about 87% of the occupants within a thermal sensation range of slightly cool (-0.5) to slightly warm (+0.5), in compliance with ASHRAE standard 55, will find intermittent air movements acceptable between 23.7 oC and 29.1 oC within a velocity range of 0.4 – 0.8 m/s.  IAJS also improved participants’ perception of air quality in conditions deemed poor under MV. The findings support the potential of IAJS as a primary ventilation system in high occupant spaces such as classrooms. 

Keywords
Intermittent air jets, Air movement acceptability, Perceived air quality, High occupant density
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23753 (URN)10.1177/1420326X17732613 (DOI)000454140000006 ()2-s2.0-85042402784 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-03-15 Created: 2017-03-15 Last updated: 2019-01-28Bibliographically approved
Sörqvist, P. & Langeborg, L. (2019). Why People Harm the Environment Although They Try to Treat It Well: An Evolutionary-Cognitive Perspective on Climate Compensation. Frontiers in Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why People Harm the Environment Although They Try to Treat It Well: An Evolutionary-Cognitive Perspective on Climate Compensation
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
Abstract [en]

Climate changes stress the importance of understanding why people harm the environment despite their attempts to behave in climate friendly ways. This paper argues that one reason behind why people do this is that people apply heuristics, originally shaped to handle social exchange, on the issues of environmental impact. Reciprocity and balance in social relations have been fundamental to social cooperation, and thus to survival, and therefore the human brain has become specialized by natural selection to compute and seek this balance. When the same reasoning is applied to environment-related behaviors, people tend to think in terms of a balance between ‘environmentally friendly’ and ‘harmful’ behaviors, and to morally account for the average of these components rather than the sum. This balancing heuristic leads to compensatory green beliefs and negative footprint illusions—the misconceptions that ‘green’ choices can compensate for unsustainable ones. ‘Eco-guilt’ from imbalance in the moral environmental account may promote pro-environmental acts, but also acts that are seemingly pro-environmental but in reality more harmful than doing nothing at all. The current paper suggests strategies for handling this cognitive insufficiency.

Keywords
Climate Change, moral accounting, natural selection, Negative footprint illusion, compensatory green beliefs, evolutionary-cognitive perspective
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29225 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00348 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-02-04 Created: 2019-02-04 Last updated: 2019-02-20Bibliographically approved
Holmgren, M. & Sörqvist, P. (2018). Are mental biases responsible for the perceived comfort advantage in "green" buildings?. Buildings, 8(2), Article ID 20.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are mental biases responsible for the perceived comfort advantage in "green" buildings?
2018 (English)In: Buildings, ISSN 2075-5309, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 8, no 2, article id 20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous research has shown that merely calling an indoor environment environmentally certified will make people favor that environment over a conventional alternative. In this paper we explore whether this effect depends on participants deliberately comparing the two environments, and whether different reasons behind the certification influence the magnitude of the effect. In Experiment 1, participants in a between-subjects design assigned higher comfort ratings to an indoor environment that had been labeled "environmentally certified" in comparison with the exact same indoor environment that was unlabeled, suggesting that the effect arises even when participants do not compare the two environments when making their estimates. The results from Experiment 2 indicate that climate change mitigation (as the reason for the certification) is a slightly better trigger of the effect compared to climate change adaptation. The results suggest that studies on psychological effects of "green" buildings should experimentally control for the influence from participants' judgmental biases.

Keywords
"green" buildings, Bias, Comfort, Eco-label effect, Environmental certification
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26074 (URN)10.3390/buildings8020020 (DOI)000427510600008 ()2-s2.0-85041341417 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-29 Created: 2018-01-29 Last updated: 2018-12-05Bibliographically approved
Holmgren, M., Andersson, H. & Sörqvist, P. (2018). Averaging bias in environmental impact estimates: Evidence from the negative footprint illusion. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 55, 48-52
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Averaging bias in environmental impact estimates: Evidence from the negative footprint illusion
2018 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 55, p. 48-52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper we argue that unsustainable behaviors often stem from a common averaging bias when people estimate the environmental impact of a set of environmentally friendly and less friendly objects or actions. In Experiment 1, we show that people believe that the total carbon footprint of a category of items (a community of buildings in this case) is lower, rather than higher, when environmentally friendly (“green” buildings) items are added to the category, a negative footprint illusion. Experiment 2 showed  that the carbon footprint estimate assigned to a category with a mix of environmentally friendly and less friendly objects (“green” and conventional  buildings) is the average of its subsets (the “green” buildings and the  conventional buildings, respectively), an averaging bias. A similar averaging  process may underpin estimates of the environmental impact of people's own actions, explaining why people believe that environmentally friendly actions can compensate for less friendly actions.

Keywords
“Green” buildings, Averaging bias Carbon footprint, The negative footprint illusion
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25882 (URN)10.1016/j.jenvp.2017.12.005 (DOI)000428489200006 ()2-s2.0-85038968856 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-12-20 Created: 2017-12-20 Last updated: 2018-04-16Bibliographically approved
Joseph, T., Hughes, R., Sörqvist, P. & Marsh, J. (2018). Differences in auditory distraction between adults and children: A duplex-mechanism approach. Journal of Cognition, 1(1), Article ID 13.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences in auditory distraction between adults and children: A duplex-mechanism approach
2018 (English)In: Journal of Cognition, E-ISSN 2514-4820, Vol. 1, no 1, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Differences in the impact of irrelevant sound on recall performance in children (aged 7-9 years old; N = 89) compared to adults (aged 18-22 years old; N = 89) were examined. Tasks that required serial rehearsal (serial and probed-order recall tasks) were contrasted with one that did not (the missing-item task) in the presence of irrelevant sound that was either steady-state (a repeated speech token), changing-state (two alternating speech tokens) and, for the first time with a child sample, could also contain a deviant token (a male-voice token embedded in a sequence otherwise spoken in a female voice). Participants either completed tasks in which the to-be-remembered list-length was adjusted to individual digit span or was fixed at one item greater than the average span we observed for the age-group. The disruptive effects of irrelevant sound did not vary across the two methods of determining list-length. We found that tasks encouraging serial rehearsal were especially affected by changing-state sequences for both age-groups (i.e., the changing-state effect) and there were no group differences in relation to this effect. In contrast, disruption by a deviant sound—generally assumed to be the result of attentional diversion—was evident among children in all three tasks while adults were less susceptible to this effect. This pattern of results suggests that developmental differences in distraction are due to differences in attentional control rather than serial rehearsal efficiency.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Ubiquity Press, 2018
Keywords
Attention; Cognitive Control; Development of cognition; Working memory
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26075 (URN)10.5334/joc.15 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-01-29 Created: 2018-01-29 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Mathiassen, S. E. & Sörqvist, P. (2018). Ergonomics observation: development of efficient methods based on cognitive psychology. In: : . Paper presented at 20th Congress International Ergonomics Association; Florens; 26-30 augusti 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ergonomics observation: development of efficient methods based on cognitive psychology
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27824 (URN)
Conference
20th Congress International Ergonomics Association; Florens; 26-30 augusti 2018
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Available from: 2018-09-04 Created: 2018-09-04 Last updated: 2018-09-04Bibliographically approved
Wallhagen, M., Eriksson, O. & Sörqvist, P. (2018). Gender Differences in Environmental Perspectives among Urban Design Professionals. Buildings, 8(4), Article ID 59.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender Differences in Environmental Perspectives among Urban Design Professionals
2018 (English)In: Buildings, ISSN 2075-5309, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 8, no 4, article id 59Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Urban design professionals are key actors in early design phases and have the possibility to influence urban development and direct it in a more sustainable direction. Therefore, gender differences in environmental perspectives among urban design professionals may have a marked effect on urban development and the environment. This study identified gender differences in environment-related attitudes among urban design professionals involved in the international architectural competition 'A New City Centre for Kiruna' in northern Sweden. Participants' self-rated possibility to influence environmental aspects was higher for males than for females. Conversely, the importance placed on environmental aspects had higher ratings among females, although the differences regarding the rating of personal responsibilitywere small. The gap between the participants' self-rated belief in their ability to influence and rated importance of environmental aspects was larger among female participants. Females placed great importance on environmental aspects even though they felt that their possibility to influence these was rather low. Conversely, male participants felt that they had the greatest possibility to influence, although some males rated the importance of environmental aspects thelowest. The gender differences identified are important froman equality and environmental perspective as they may influence pro-environmental behavior among urban design professionals and ultimately influence the environmental performance of the built environment.

Keywords
Architects, Architectural competition, Environmental aspects, Environmental impact, Gender, Possibility to influence, Pro-environmental behavior, Responsibility, Urban design, Urban planners
National Category
Applied Psychology Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26529 (URN)10.3390/buildings8040059 (DOI)000430894400013 ()2-s2.0-85045747862 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-02 Created: 2018-05-02 Last updated: 2018-06-04Bibliographically approved
Holmgren, M., Kabanshi, A., Marsh, J. E. & Sörqvist, P. (2018). When A+B < A: Cognitive bias in experts' judgment of environmental impact. Frontiers in Psychology, 9, Article ID 823.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>When A+B < A: Cognitive bias in experts' judgment of environmental impact
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 9, article id 823Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

When ‘environmentally friendly’ items are added to a set of conventional items, people report that the total set will have a lower environmental impact even though the actual impact increases. One hypothesis is that this “negative footprint illusion” arises because people, who are susceptible to the illusion, lack necessary knowledge of the item’s actual environmental impact, perhaps coupled with a lack of mathematical skills. The study reported here addressed this hypothesis by recruiting participants (‘experts’) from a master’s program in energy systems, who thus have bachelor degrees in energy-related fields including academic training in mathematics. They were asked to estimate the number of trees needed to compensate for the environmental burden of two sets of buildings: One set of 150 buildings with conventional energy ratings and one set including the same 150 buildings but also 50 ‘green’ (energy-efficient) buildings. The experts reported that less trees were needed to compensate for the set with 150 conventional and 50 ‘green’ buildings compared to the set with only the 150 conventional buildings. This negative footprint illusion was as large in magnitude for the experts as it was for a group of novices without academic training in energy-related fields. We conclude that people are not immune to the negative footprint illusion even when they have the knowledge necessary to make accurate judgments.

Keywords
averaging bias, Climate Change, Environmental impact, Judgment, Negative footprint illusion
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26530 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00823 (DOI)000433393500002 ()29896142 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047665372 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-02 Created: 2018-05-02 Last updated: 2018-06-25Bibliographically approved
Ellis, R., Sörqvist, P., Zekveld, A. & Rönnberg, J. (2017). Editorial: Cognitive hearing mechanisms of language understanding: Short- and long-term perspectives. Frontiers in Psychology, 8, 1-4, Article ID 1060.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial: Cognitive hearing mechanisms of language understanding: Short- and long-term perspectives
2017 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 8, p. 1-4, article id 1060Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-24086 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01060 (DOI)000403870900001 ()28690579 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85021211471 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-06-08 Created: 2017-06-08 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Kabanshi, A., Wigö, H., Ljung, R. & Sörqvist, P. (2017). Human perception of room temperature and intermittent air jet cooling in a classroom. Indoor + Built Environment, 26(4), 528-537
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human perception of room temperature and intermittent air jet cooling in a classroom
2017 (English)In: Indoor + Built Environment, ISSN 1420-326X, E-ISSN 1423-0070, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 528-537Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Environments with high temperatures and under steady conditions are perceived poor. The introduction of airflow variations in such environments improves the perception. However the risk of draught is high and to avoid this, variations in high velocity supply is used. This method is far more energy efficient than cooling the entire space as only the occupants are cooled. This paper discusses two studies on occupant cooling conducted at the University of Gävle.  The experiments were performed in a full scale mockup classroom and a total of 85 students participated. In Study 1, students sat in a classroom for about 60 minutes in one of two heat conditions: 20 and 25 º C. In Study 2, the indoor parameters of 25 º C were maintained but airflow variation in the sitting zone was manipulated. In both studies, the participants performed various tasks and answered questionnaires on their perception of the indoor climate. As shown here, higher room temperature deteriorates human perception of the indoor climate in classrooms, and the use of intermittent air jet cooling improves the perception of indoor climate just like cooling by reducing the room air temperature. This study contributes to further knowledge of how convective cooling can be used as a method of cooling in school environments so as to improve on building energy use. 

Keywords
Heat, air jet cooling, Air velocity variations, Human perception, Indoor air quality, thermal sensation
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Building Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-20211 (URN)10.1177/1420326X16628931 (DOI)000400158700008 ()2-s2.0-85019000704 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-09-07 Created: 2015-09-07 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7584-2275

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