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Sörqvist, Patrik, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7584-2275
Publications (10 of 120) Show all publications
Wallhagen, M., Sörqvist, P., Holmgren, M. & Andersson, H. (2019). Brister i vårt logiska tänkande ett hinder för klimatkloka beslut. Husbyggaren (1), 23-25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Brister i vårt logiska tänkande ett hinder för klimatkloka beslut
2019 (Swedish)In: Husbyggaren, ISSN 0018-7968, no 1, p. 23-25Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Building Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29458 (URN)
Available from: 2019-04-12 Created: 2019-04-12 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Sörqvist, P. & Langeborg, L. (2019). Compensating for climate misdeeds can make you a worse carbon emitter. New scientist (1971) (4-mar)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Compensating for climate misdeeds can make you a worse carbon emitter
2019 (English)In: New scientist (1971), ISSN 0262-4079, no 4-marArticle in journal, News item (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29352 (URN)
Available from: 2019-03-05 Created: 2019-03-05 Last updated: 2019-11-28Bibliographically approved
Holmgren, M., Kabanshi, A., Langeborg, L., Barthel, S., Colding, J., Eriksson, O. & Sörqvist, P. (2019). Deceptive sustainability: Cognitive bias in people's judgment of the benefits of CO2 emission cuts. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 64, 48-55
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deceptive sustainability: Cognitive bias in people's judgment of the benefits of CO2 emission cuts
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 64, p. 48-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

People's beliefs in the actions necessary to reduce anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are important to public policy acceptability. The current paper addressed beliefs concerning how periods of small emission cuts contribute to the total CO2 concentration in the atmosphere, by asking participants to rate the atmospheric CO2 concentration for various time periods and emission rates. The participants thought that a time period with higher emission rates combined with a period of lower emission rates generates less atmospheric CO2 in total, compared to the period with high emission rates alone – demonstrating a negative footprint illusion (Study 1). The participants appeared to base their CO2 estimates on the average, rather than on the accumulated sum, of the two periods' emissions – i.e. an averaging bias (Study 2). Moreover, the effect was robust to the wordings of the problem presented to the participants (Study 3). Together, these studies suggest that the averaging bias makes people exaggerate the benefits of small emission cuts. The averaging bias could make people willing to accept policies that reduce emission rates although insufficiently to alleviate global warming.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Climate change; Global warming; Averaging bias; Negative footprint illusion
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29596 (URN)10.1016/j.jenvp.2019.05.005 (DOI)000484869600006 ()2-s2.0-85066452463 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-24 Created: 2019-05-24 Last updated: 2019-10-09Bibliographically approved
Sörqvist, P. & Langeborg, L. (2019). Hurting the world you love. New scientist (1971), 241(3221), 24-25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hurting the world you love
2019 (English)In: New scientist (1971), ISSN 0262-4079, Vol. 241, no 3221, p. 24-25Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
REED BUSINESS INFORMATION LTD, 2019
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29918 (URN)10.1016/S0262-4079(19)30464-6 (DOI)000461533400021 ()
Available from: 2019-06-14 Created: 2019-06-14 Last updated: 2019-06-14Bibliographically approved
Kabanshi, A., Yang, B., Sörqvist, P. & Sandberg, M. (2019). Occupants’ perception of air movements and air quality in a simulated classroom with an intermittent air supply system. Indoor + Built Environment, 28(1), 63-76
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupants’ perception of air movements and air quality in a simulated classroom with an intermittent air supply system
2019 (English)In: Indoor + Built Environment, ISSN 1420-326X, E-ISSN 1423-0070, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 63-76Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study reported herein builds on occupant response to an intermittent air jet strategy (IAJS), which creates periodic airflow and non-isothermal conditions in the occupied zone.  Previous research has highlighted the benefits of IAJS on thermal climate and supports energy saving potential in view of human thermal perception of the indoor environment. In this study, the goal was to explore occupant acceptability of air movements and perceived indoor air quality, and to determine a way of assessing acceptable air movement conditions under IAJS. Thirty-six participants were exposed to twelve conditions: three room air temperatures (nominal: 22.5, 25.5 and 28.5 oC), each with varied air speeds (nominal: <0.15 m/s under mixing ventilation (MV), and 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 m/s under IAJS) measured at the breathing height (1.1 m). The results show that participants preferred low air movements at lower temperatures and high air movements at higher temperatures. A model to predict percentage satisfied with intermittent air movements was developed, and predicts that about 87% of the occupants within a thermal sensation range of slightly cool (-0.5) to slightly warm (+0.5), in compliance with ASHRAE standard 55, will find intermittent air movements acceptable between 23.7 oC and 29.1 oC within a velocity range of 0.4 – 0.8 m/s.  IAJS also improved participants’ perception of air quality in conditions deemed poor under MV. The findings support the potential of IAJS as a primary ventilation system in high occupant spaces such as classrooms. 

Keywords
Intermittent air jets, Air movement acceptability, Perceived air quality, High occupant density
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23753 (URN)10.1177/1420326X17732613 (DOI)000454140000006 ()2-s2.0-85042402784 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-03-15 Created: 2017-03-15 Last updated: 2019-11-29Bibliographically approved
Sörqvist, P. & Marsh, J. E. (Eds.). (2019). The Cognitive Psychology of Climate Change. Frontiers Media S.A.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Cognitive Psychology of Climate Change
2019 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Climate change is one of society’s great challenges. The scientific community agrees that human activity is to a large degree responsible for these changes and efforts to promote more sustainable behaviors and lifestyles often backfire. People travel for longer distances when driving a vehicle that uses a ‘sustainable’ energy source; they purchase ‘organic’ food as a means to be environmentally friendly without necessarily reducing other means of consumption; and those who deliberately change their behavior to be more environmentally friendly in one area often start behaving environmentally irresponsibly in another. Environmentally harmful behavior and decision making often have their roots in cognitive biases and cognitive inabilities to properly understand climate change issues, to understand the effects of one's own behavior on the environment, and other means by which thinking and reasoning about climate change issues are biased.

This Research Topic addresses the cognitive challenges of climate change: how people perceive, understand and solve environmental problems. It covers studies on individual and collective judgment and decision making, heuristics and biases, reasoning and thinking, perception and problem solving in relation to climate change and sustainability-related problems. It also covers, but is not limited to, the cognitive psychology of the CO2 accumulation problem, biases in judgments of environmental impact of objects and actions, confirmation biases in thinking and reasoning about climate change issues, and ways in which people's thinking about and understanding of climate change problems can be improved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Series
Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-8714
Keywords
Perception, Judgement, Cognition, Climate Change, Environment
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30684 (URN)10.3389/978-2-88963-013-4 (DOI)9782889630134 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-09-24 Created: 2019-09-24 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Sörqvist, P. & Langeborg, L. (2019). Why People Harm the Environment Although They Try to Treat It Well: An Evolutionary-Cognitive Perspective on Climate Compensation. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, Article ID 348.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why People Harm the Environment Although They Try to Treat It Well: An Evolutionary-Cognitive Perspective on Climate Compensation
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 348Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate changes stress the importance of understanding why people harm the environment despite their attempts to behave in climate friendly ways. This paper argues that one reason behind why people do this is that people apply heuristics, originally shaped to handle social exchange, on the issues of environmental impact. Reciprocity and balance in social relations have been fundamental to social cooperation, and thus to survival, and therefore the human brain has become specialized by natural selection to compute and seek this balance. When the same reasoning is applied to environment-related behaviors, people tend to think in terms of a balance between ‘environmentally friendly’ and ‘harmful’ behaviors, and to morally account for the average of these components rather than the sum. This balancing heuristic leads to compensatory green beliefs and negative footprint illusions—the misconceptions that ‘green’ choices can compensate for unsustainable ones. ‘Eco-guilt’ from imbalance in the moral environmental account may promote pro-environmental acts, but also acts that are seemingly pro-environmental but in reality more harmful than doing nothing at all. The current paper suggests strategies for handling this cognitive insufficiency.

Keywords
Climate Change, moral accounting, natural selection, Negative footprint illusion, compensatory green beliefs, evolutionary-cognitive perspective
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29225 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00348 (DOI)000460299600001 ()30886596 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065163465 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-02-04 Created: 2019-02-04 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Colding, J., Barthel, S. & Sörqvist, P. (2019). Wicked Problems of Smart Cities. Smart Cities, 2(4), 512-521
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wicked Problems of Smart Cities
2019 (English)In: Smart Cities, ISSN 2624-6511, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 512-521Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is often uncritically assumed that, when digital technologies are integrated into the operation of city functions, they inevitably contribute to sustainable urban development. Such a notion rests largely on the belief that Information and Communication Technology (ICT) solutions pave the way for more democratic forms of planning, and that ‘smart’ technological devices result in a range of environmental benefits, e.g., energy efficiency and the mitigation of global warming. Drawing on the scientific literature that deals with ‘smart cities’, we here elaborate on how both propositions fail to consider drawbacks that could be characterized as ‘wicked’, i.e., problems that lack simplistic solutions and straightforward planning responses, and which often come about as ‘management surprises’, as a byproduct of achieving sustainability. We here deal with problems related to public choice constraints, ‘non-choice default technologies’ and the costs of automation for human learning and resilience. To avoid undemocratic forms of planning and too strong a dependence on non-choice default technologies, e.g., smart phones, we recommend that planners and policy makers safeguard redundancy in public-choice options by maintaining a wide range of alternative choices, including analog ones. Resilience thinking could help planners deal more effectively with the ‘wickedness’ of an increasingly hyper-connected society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
smart city; wicked problems; public choice constraints; automation; default technologies; resilience
National Category
Environmental Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-31000 (URN)10.3390/smartcities2040031 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2019-11-20 Created: 2019-11-20 Last updated: 2019-11-25Bibliographically approved
Holmgren, M. & Sörqvist, P. (2018). Are mental biases responsible for the perceived comfort advantage in "green" buildings?. Buildings, 8(2), Article ID 20.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are mental biases responsible for the perceived comfort advantage in "green" buildings?
2018 (English)In: Buildings, ISSN 2075-5309, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 8, no 2, article id 20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous research has shown that merely calling an indoor environment environmentally certified will make people favor that environment over a conventional alternative. In this paper we explore whether this effect depends on participants deliberately comparing the two environments, and whether different reasons behind the certification influence the magnitude of the effect. In Experiment 1, participants in a between-subjects design assigned higher comfort ratings to an indoor environment that had been labeled "environmentally certified" in comparison with the exact same indoor environment that was unlabeled, suggesting that the effect arises even when participants do not compare the two environments when making their estimates. The results from Experiment 2 indicate that climate change mitigation (as the reason for the certification) is a slightly better trigger of the effect compared to climate change adaptation. The results suggest that studies on psychological effects of "green" buildings should experimentally control for the influence from participants' judgmental biases.

Keywords
"green" buildings, Bias, Comfort, Eco-label effect, Environmental certification
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26074 (URN)10.3390/buildings8020020 (DOI)000427510600008 ()2-s2.0-85041341417 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-29 Created: 2018-01-29 Last updated: 2019-09-05Bibliographically approved
Holmgren, M., Andersson, H. & Sörqvist, P. (2018). Averaging bias in environmental impact estimates: Evidence from the negative footprint illusion. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 55, 48-52
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Averaging bias in environmental impact estimates: Evidence from the negative footprint illusion
2018 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 55, p. 48-52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper we argue that unsustainable behaviors often stem from a common averaging bias when people estimate the environmental impact of a set of environmentally friendly and less friendly objects or actions. In Experiment 1, we show that people believe that the total carbon footprint of a category of items (a community of buildings in this case) is lower, rather than higher, when environmentally friendly (“green” buildings) items are added to the category, a negative footprint illusion. Experiment 2 showed  that the carbon footprint estimate assigned to a category with a mix of environmentally friendly and less friendly objects (“green” and conventional  buildings) is the average of its subsets (the “green” buildings and the  conventional buildings, respectively), an averaging bias. A similar averaging  process may underpin estimates of the environmental impact of people's own actions, explaining why people believe that environmentally friendly actions can compensate for less friendly actions.

Keywords
“Green” buildings, Averaging bias Carbon footprint, The negative footprint illusion
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25882 (URN)10.1016/j.jenvp.2017.12.005 (DOI)000428489200006 ()2-s2.0-85038968856 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-12-20 Created: 2017-12-20 Last updated: 2018-04-16Bibliographically approved
Projects
A new perspective on selective attention: Is there a relation between the cognitive and the physiological mechanisms of hearing? [P11-0617:1_RJ]; University of Gävle; Publications
Halin, N., Marsh, J. E. & Sörqvist, P. (2015). Central load reduces peripheral processing: evidence from incidental memory of background speech. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 56(6), 607-612Sörqvist, P., Dahlström, Ö., Karlsson, T., Stenfelt, S. & Rönnberg, J. (2015). Central/cognitive load modulates peripheral/perceptual processing. In: Maria Hugo-Lindén (Ed.), Abstract book: Third International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication 14–17 June 2015 Linköping, Sweden. Paper presented at Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHSCOM 2015), 14-17 June 2015, Linköping, Sweden (pp. 62-62). Marsh, J. E., Sörqvist, P. & Hughes, R. (2015). Dynamic cognitive control of irrelevant sound: increased task engagement attenuates semantic auditory distraction. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 41(5), 1462-1474Halin, N., Marsh, J. & Sörqvist, P. (2015). Higher Task Difficulty Shields Against Background Speech. In: : . Paper presented at BCEP 2015, 11th Biennial Conference on Environmental Psychology, Bridging theory and practice: inspiring the future of environmental psychology, 24-26 August 2015, Groningen, The Netherlands. GävleSörqvist, P. & Marsh, J. E. (2015). How concentration shields against distraction. Current directions in psychological science (Print), 24(4), 267-272Sörqvist, P., Marsh, J. & Halin, N. (2015). How concentration shields against distraction. In: : . Paper presented at 32nd BPS Cognitive Psychology Section Annual Conference, 1-3 September 2015, University of Kent, Kent, UK. Halin, N., Marsh, J., Hellman, A., Hellström, I. & Sörqvist, P. (2014). A shield against distraction. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, 3(1), 31-36Halin, N., Marsh, J., Haga, A., Holmgren, M. & Sörqvist, P. (2014). Effects of speech on proofreading: can task-engagement manipulations shield against distraction?. Journal of experimental psychology. Applied, 20(1), 69-80Sörqvist, P. & Rönnberg, J. (2014). Individual differences in distractibility: an update and a model. PsyCh Journal, 3(1), 42-57Marsh, J. E., Sörqvist, P. & Hughes, R. W. (2013). Cognitive control of distraction: How does task engagement modulate the effects of between-sequence semantic similarity?. In: Abstracts of the Psychonomic Society: Volume 18, November 2013, 54th Annual Meeting. Paper presented at 2013 Psychonomic Society Annual Meeting, Ontario, Canada, 14-17 Nobember 2013.
A new perspective on working memory and its relation to attention and learning [2015-01116_VR]; University of Gävle; Publications
Marsh, J. E., Hansson, P., Eriksson Sörman, D. & Körning Ljungberg, J. (2019). Executive Processes Underpin the Bilingual Advantage on Phonemic Fluency: Evidence from Analyses of Switching and Clustering. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, Article ID 1355. Marsh, J. E., Campbell, T. A., Vachon, F., Taylor, P. J. & Hughes, R. W. (2019). How the deployment of visual attention modulates auditory distraction. Attention, Perception & PsychophysicsMarois, A., Marsh, J. E. & Vachon, F. (2019). Is auditory distraction by changing-state and deviant sounds underpinned by the same mechanism?: Evidence from pupillometry. Biological Psychology, 141, 64-74Campbell, T. A. & Marsh, J. E. (2019). On corticopetal-corticofugal loops of the new early filter: from cell assemblies to the rostral brainstem. NeuroReport, 30(3), 202-206Hughes, R. W. & Marsh, J. E. (2019). When is forewarned forearmed?: Predicting auditory distraction in short-term memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory and CognitionRichter, H., Forsman, M., Elcadi, G. H., Brautaset, R., Marsh, J. E. & Zetterberg, C. (2018). Prefrontal cortex activity evoked by convergence load under conflicting stimulus-to-accommodation and stimulus-to-vergence eye-movements measured by NIRS: Prefrontal cortex oxygenation and visual fatigue. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 12, Article ID 298. Sörqvist, P., Dahlström, Ö., Karlsson, T. & Rönnberg, J. (2016). Concentration: the neural underpinnings of how cognitive load shields against distraction. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 10, Article ID 221. Nöstl, A., Sörqvist, P. & Marsh, J. (2013). Attentional Capture by Auditory Events: The role of Expectations. In: : . Paper presented at Cognitive Hearing Science, Linköping, Sweden, June 16-19 2013.
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7584-2275

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