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Sörqvist, Patrik, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7584-2275
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Publications (10 of 135) Show all publications
Linklater, R., Judge, J., Sörqvist, P. & Marsh, J. (2023). Auditory Distraction of Vocal-Motor Behaviour by Different Components of Song: Testing an Interference-by-Process Account. Journal of Cognitive Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Auditory Distraction of Vocal-Motor Behaviour by Different Components of Song: Testing an Interference-by-Process Account
2023 (English)In: Journal of Cognitive Psychology, ISSN 2044-5911, E-ISSN 2044-592XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The process-oriented account of auditory distraction suggests that task-disruption is a consequence of the joint action of task- and sound-related processes. Here, four experiments put this view to the test by examining the extent to which to-be-ignored melodies (with or without lyrics) influence vocal-motor processing. Using song retrieval tasks (i.e., reproduction of melodies or lyrics from long-term memory), the results revealed a pattern of disruption that was consistent with an interference-by-process view: disruption depended jointly on the nature of the vocal-motor retrieval (e.g., melody retrieval via humming vs. spoken lyrics) and the characteristics of the sound (whether it contained lyrics and was familiar to the participants). Furthermore, the sound properties, influential in disrupting song reproduction, were not influential for disrupting visual-verbal short-term memory—a task that is arguably underpinned by non-semantic vocal-motor planning processes. Generally, these results cohere better with the process-oriented view, in comparison with competing accounts (e.g., interference-by-content).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
music performance, vocal motor-planning, auditory distraction, interference-by-process
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
no Strategic Research Area (SFO)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-43232 (URN)10.1080/20445911.2023.2284404 (DOI)001115753000001 ()2-s2.0-85179921440 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-10 Created: 2023-11-10 Last updated: 2023-12-25Bibliographically approved
Marsh, J. E., Vachon, F., Sörqvist, P., Marsja, E., Röer, J., Richardson, B. & Ljungberg, J. (2023). Irrelevant changing-state vibrotactile stimuli disrupt verbal serial recall: Implications for theories of interference in short-term memory. Journal of Cognitive Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Irrelevant changing-state vibrotactile stimuli disrupt verbal serial recall: Implications for theories of interference in short-term memory
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Cognitive Psychology, ISSN 2044-5911, E-ISSN 2044-592XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

What causes interference in short-term memory? We report the novel finding that immediate memory for visually-presented verbal items is sensitive to disruption from task-irrelevant vibrotactile stimuli. Specifically, short-term memory for a visual sequence is disrupted by a concurrently presented sequence of vibrations, but only when the vibrotactile sequence entails change (when the sequence “jumps” between the two hands). The impact on visual-verbal serial recall was similar in magnitude to that for auditory stimuli (Experiment 1). Performance of the missing item task, requiring recall of item-identity rather than item-order, was unaffected by changing-state vibrotactile stimuli (Experiment 2), as with changing-state auditory stimuli. Moreover, the predictability of the changing-state sequence did not modulate the magnitude of the effect, arguing against an attention-capture conceptualisation (Experiment 3). Results support the view that interference in short-term memory is produced by conflict between incompatible, amodal serial-ordering processes (interference-by-process) rather than interference between similar representational codes (interference-by-content).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
auditory distraction; cross-modal interference; modality; Short-term memory; vibrotactile distraction
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
no Strategic Research Area (SFO)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-41132 (URN)10.1080/20445911.2023.2198065 (DOI)000970460400001 ()2-s2.0-85152445126 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2211-0505Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2014.0205Swedish Research Council, 2015-01116
Available from: 2023-03-06 Created: 2023-03-06 Last updated: 2023-05-22Bibliographically approved
Linder, N., Sörqvist, P., Lindahl, T. & Ljung, R. (2023). Managing waste behavior by manipulating the normative appeal of trash bins: Lessons from an urban field experiment. Resources, Conservation & Recycling Advances, 19, Article ID 200186.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing waste behavior by manipulating the normative appeal of trash bins: Lessons from an urban field experiment
2023 (English)In: Resources, Conservation & Recycling Advances, E-ISSN 2667-3789, Vol. 19, article id 200186Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Littering is a problem in many human societies. In this study, 9 individual street bins were manipulated on a central street in the city of Gävle, Sweden. The aim was to explore if changing the appearance of the bins, thereby manipulating the different types of social norms they signal, can increase the amount of trash they collect and mitigate littering. A field experiment tested the effectiveness of two alternatives to the conventional grey street bin; one bin foliated with pictures drawn by school children containing a normative anti-littering message (explicit norm), and one bright orange salient bin (implicit norm). Observed behavioral data was collected, and both the weight and volume of trash in the bins were measured each day for a period of one month. The results showed a tendency for the salient orange bin to increase trash collection compared to other bins; an effect most tangible towards the end of the weeks. The biggest effect was, however, that the explicitly normative bin reduced trash collection overall. These results provide lessons on how the appearance of bins can influence trash collection, potentially resulting in both desirable and undesirable outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Design; Littering; Norms; Physical environment; Pro-environmental behavior; Saliency
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Sustainable Urban Development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-43129 (URN)10.1016/j.rcradv.2023.200186 (DOI)001102865100001 ()2-s2.0-85174697881 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-10-13 Created: 2023-10-13 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
Kron, N., Björkman, J., Ek, P., Pihlgren, M., Mazraeh, H., Berggren, B. & Sörqvist, P. (2023). The demand-what-you-want strategy to service recovery: Achieving high customer satisfaction with low service failure compensation using anchoring and precision effects. Journal of service theory and practice, 33(7), 73-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The demand-what-you-want strategy to service recovery: Achieving high customer satisfaction with low service failure compensation using anchoring and precision effects
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2023 (English)In: Journal of service theory and practice, ISSN 2055-6225, E-ISSN 2055-6233, Vol. 33, no 7, p. 73-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

Previous research suggests that the compensation offered to customers after a service failure has to be substantial to make customer satisfaction surpass that of an error-free service. However, with the right service recovery strategy, it might be possible to reduce compensation size while maintaining happy customers. The aim of the current study is to test whether an anchoring technique can be used to achieve this goal.

Design/methodology/approach

After experiencing a service failure, participants were told that there is a standard size of the compensation for service failures. The size of this standard was different depending on condition. Thereafter, participants were asked how much they would demand to be satisfied with their customer experience.

Findings

The compensation demand was relatively high on average (1,000–1,400 SEK, ≈ $120). However, telling the participants that customers typically receive 200 SEK as compensation reduced their demand to about 800 SEK (Experiment 1)—an anchoring effect. Moreover, a precise anchoring point (a typical compensation of 247 SEK) generated a lower demand than rounded anchoring points, even when the rounded anchoring point was lower (200 SEK) than the precise counterpart (Experiment 2)—a precision effect.

Implications/value

Setting a low compensation standard—yet allowing customers to actually receive compensations above the standard—can make customers more satisfied while also saving resources in demand-what-you-want service recovery situations, in particular when the compensation standard is a precise value.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald, 2023
Keywords
Anchoring effect; Compensation; Customer satisfaction; Demand-what-you-want; Precision effect; Service failure; Service recovery
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-42802 (URN)10.1108/JSTP-02-2023-0029 (DOI)001053750100001 ()2-s2.0-85169132151 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-07 Created: 2023-08-07 Last updated: 2023-09-07Bibliographically approved
Andersson, H., Holmgren, M., Sörqvist, P., Threadgold, E., Beaman, P., Ball, L. & Marsh, J. E. (2023). The Negative Footprint Illusion is Exacerbated by the Numerosity of Environment-Friendly Additions: Unveiling the Underpinning Mechanisms. Journal of Cognitive Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Negative Footprint Illusion is Exacerbated by the Numerosity of Environment-Friendly Additions: Unveiling the Underpinning Mechanisms
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Cognitive Psychology, ISSN 2044-5911, E-ISSN 2044-592XArticle in journal (Refereed) Accepted
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Sustainable Urban Development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-43413 (URN)
Available from: 2023-12-08 Created: 2023-12-08 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
Hartwig, F., Hansson, E., Nielsen, L. & Sörqvist, P. (2023). The relation between auditing and accounting timeliness in Swedish private firms. Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, 31(3), 379-396
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The relation between auditing and accounting timeliness in Swedish private firms
2023 (English)In: Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, ISSN 1358-1988, E-ISSN 1740-0279, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 379-396Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between auditing/non-auditing and accounting timeliness among Swedish private firms.

Design/methodology/approach: This paper uses regression analysis to test the relationship between auditing and two measurements of timeliness; lead time and late filing. The sample consists of Swedish private firms.

Findings: The paper finds that audited firms, when compared with unaudited firms, are significantly less timely. Moreover, greater profitability was associated with more timeliness but only for audited firms. The results also show that firms being audited by a big 4-auditor are significantly timelier than firms being audited by a non-big 4 auditor.

Practical implications: The findings in this paper suggests that one aspect of accounting quality, timeliness, does not seem to benefit from auditing in a Swedish context. There is a debate about whether the threshold levels in Sweden should be raised so that more firms voluntarily can opt out of audit. Those opposing a raised threshold level claim that auditing has positive effects on accounting quality and consequently that a raised level would have adverse effects. The findings in this paper do not support such a claim.

Originality/value: Little is known about timeliness in private firms compared to public firms and this paper fills that void. Contrary to prior research, findings show that unaudited firms in a Swedish regulatory setting actually are timelier than their audited counterparts. This questions one of the (presumed) benefits of auditing and should stimulate more research on this issue.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2023
Keywords
Accounting timeliness, auditing, big 4-auditor, accounting lead time, late filing of annual report
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Intelligent Industry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40557 (URN)10.1108/JFRC-03-2022-0040 (DOI)000919949500001 ()2-s2.0-85147202405 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-12-04 Created: 2022-12-04 Last updated: 2023-06-02Bibliographically approved
Rönnberg, J., Sharma, A., Signoret, C., Campbell, T. A. & Sörqvist, P. (2022). Editorial: Cognitive hearing science: Investigating the relationship between selective attention and brain activity. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 16, Article ID 1098340.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial: Cognitive hearing science: Investigating the relationship between selective attention and brain activity
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2022 (English)In: Frontiers in Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-4548, E-ISSN 1662-453X, Vol. 16, article id 1098340Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers, 2022
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40706 (URN)10.3389/fnins.2022.1098340 (DOI)000903753300001 ()36583104 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85145097159 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-06092
Available from: 2023-01-05 Created: 2023-01-05 Last updated: 2023-01-19Bibliographically approved
Sörqvist, P., Volna, I., Zhao, J. & Marsh, J. E. (2022). Irregular stimulus distribution increases the negative footprint illusion. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 63(5), 530-535
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Irregular stimulus distribution increases the negative footprint illusion
2022 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 63, no 5, p. 530-535Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As a climate change mitigation strategy, environmentally certified 'green' buildings with low carbon footprints are becoming more prevalent in the world. An interesting psychological question is how people perceive the carbon footprint of these buildings given their spatial distributions in a given community. Here we examine whether regular distribution (i.e., buildings organized in a block) or irregular distribution (i.e., buildings randomly distributed) influences people's perception of the carbon footprint of the communities. We first replicated the negative footprint illusion, the tendency to estimate a lower carbon footprint of a combined group of environmentally certified green buildings and ordinary conventional buildings, than the carbon footprint of the conventional buildings alone. Importantly, we found that irregular distribution of the buildings increased the magnitude of the negative footprint illusion. Potential applied implications for urban planning of green buildings are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2022
Keywords
Negative footprint illusion; perceived numerosity; spatial distribution
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Sustainable Urban Development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-38442 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12829 (DOI)000854979500013 ()35607836 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85130605424 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-04-21 Created: 2022-04-21 Last updated: 2022-09-29Bibliographically approved
Sörqvist, P., MacCutcheon, D., Holmgren, M., Haga, A. & Västfjäll, D. (2022). Moral spillover in carbon offset judgments. Frontiers in Psychology, 13, Article ID 957252.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Moral spillover in carbon offset judgments
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2022 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 13, article id 957252Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Moral spillover occurs when a morally loaded behavior becomes associated with another source. In the current paper, we addressed whether the moral motive behind causing CO2 emissions spills over on to how much people think is needed to compensate for the emissions. Reforestation (planting trees) is a common carbon-offset technique. With this in mind, participants estimated the number of trees needed to compensate for the carbon emissions from vehicles that were traveling with various moral motives. Two experiments revealed that people think larger carbon offsets are needed to compensate for the emissions when the emissions are caused by traveling for immoral reasons, in comparison with when caused by traveling for moral reasons. Hence, moral motives influence people’s judgments of carbon-offset requirements even though these motives have no bearing on what is compensated for. Moreover, the effect was insensitive to individual differences in carbon literacy and gender and to the unit (kilograms or tons) in which the CO2 emissions were expressed to the participants. The findings stress the role of emotion in how people perceive carbon offsetting.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers, 2022
Keywords
carbon offsets; compensation estimates; emotion; moral motives; moral spillover
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Sustainable Urban Development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-39960 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2022.957252 (DOI)000876461700001 ()36312167 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85140800600 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-09-21 Created: 2022-09-21 Last updated: 2022-11-17Bibliographically approved
Sörqvist, P. & Holmgren, M. (2022). The negative footprint illusion in environmental impact estimates: Methodological considerations. Frontiers in Psychology, 13, Article ID 990056.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The negative footprint illusion in environmental impact estimates: Methodological considerations
2022 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 13, article id 990056Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Past research has consistently shown that carbon footprint estimates of a set of conventional and more environmentally friendly items in combination tend to be lower than estimates of the conventional items alone. This ‘negative footprint illusion’ is a benchmark for the study of how cognitive heuristics and biases underpin environmentally significant behavior. However, for this to be a useful paradigm, the findings must also be reliable and valid, and an understanding of how methodological details such as response time pressure influence the illusion is necessary. Past research has cast some doubt as to whether the illusion is obtained when responses are made on a ratio/quantitative scale and when a within-participants design is used. Moreover, in past research on the negative footprint illusion, participants have had essentially as much time as they liked to make the estimates. It is yet unknown how time pressure influences the effect. This paper reports an experiment that found the effect when participants were asked to estimate the items’ emissions in kilograms CO2 (a ratio scale) under high and under low time pressure, using a within-participants design. Thus, the negative footprint illusion seems to be a reliable and valid phenomenon that generalizes across methodological considerations and is not an artifact of specific details in the experimental setup.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers, 2022
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40312 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2022.990056 (DOI)000871298500001 ()36262445 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85140030981 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-10-27 Created: 2022-10-27 Last updated: 2022-11-06Bibliographically approved
Projects
A new perspective on selective attention: Is there a relation between the cognitive and the physiological mechanisms of hearing? [P11-0617:1_RJ]; University of Gävle; Publications
Halin, N., Marsh, J. E. & Sörqvist, P. (2015). Central load reduces peripheral processing: evidence from incidental memory of background speech. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 56(6), 607-612Sörqvist, P., Dahlström, Ö., Karlsson, T., Stenfelt, S. & Rönnberg, J. (2015). Central/cognitive load modulates peripheral/perceptual processing. In: Maria Hugo-Lindén (Ed.), Abstract book: Third International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication 14–17 June 2015 Linköping, Sweden. Paper presented at Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHSCOM 2015), 14-17 June 2015, Linköping, Sweden (pp. 62-62). Marsh, J. E., Sörqvist, P. & Hughes, R. (2015). Dynamic cognitive control of irrelevant sound: increased task engagement attenuates semantic auditory distraction. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 41(5), 1462-1474Halin, N., Marsh, J. & Sörqvist, P. (2015). Higher Task Difficulty Shields Against Background Speech. In: : . Paper presented at BCEP 2015, 11th Biennial Conference on Environmental Psychology, Bridging theory and practice: inspiring the future of environmental psychology, 24-26 August 2015, Groningen, The Netherlands. GävleSörqvist, P. & Marsh, J. E. (2015). How concentration shields against distraction. Current directions in psychological science (Print), 24(4), 267-272Sörqvist, P., Marsh, J. & Halin, N. (2015). How concentration shields against distraction. In: : . Paper presented at 32nd BPS Cognitive Psychology Section Annual Conference, 1-3 September 2015, University of Kent, Kent, UK. Halin, N., Marsh, J., Hellman, A., Hellström, I. & Sörqvist, P. (2014). A shield against distraction. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, 3(1), 31-36Halin, N., Marsh, J., Haga, A., Holmgren, M. & Sörqvist, P. (2014). Effects of speech on proofreading: can task-engagement manipulations shield against distraction?. Journal of experimental psychology. Applied, 20(1), 69-80Sörqvist, P. & Rönnberg, J. (2014). Individual differences in distractibility: an update and a model. PsyCh Journal, 3(1), 42-57Marsh, J. E., Sörqvist, P. & Hughes, R. W. (2013). Cognitive control of distraction: How does task engagement modulate the effects of between-sequence semantic similarity?. In: Abstracts of the Psychonomic Society: Volume 18, November 2013, 54th Annual Meeting. Paper presented at 2013 Psychonomic Society Annual Meeting, Ontario, Canada, 14-17 Nobember 2013.
A new perspective on working memory and its relation to attention and learning [2015-01116_VR]; University of Gävle; Publications
Marsh, J. E., Campbell, T. A., Vachon, F., Taylor, P. J. & Hughes, R. W. (2020). How the deployment of visual attention modulates auditory distraction. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, 82(1), 350-362Hughes, R. W. & Marsh, J. E. (2020). When is forewarned forearmed?: Predicting auditory distraction in short-term memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory and Cognition, 46(3), 427-442Marsh, J. E., Hansson, P., Eriksson Sörman, D. & Körning Ljungberg, J. (2019). Executive Processes Underpin the Bilingual Advantage on Phonemic Fluency: Evidence from Analyses of Switching and Clustering. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, Article ID 1355. Marois, A., Marsh, J. E. & Vachon, F. (2019). Is auditory distraction by changing-state and deviant sounds underpinned by the same mechanism?: Evidence from pupillometry. Biological Psychology, 141, 64-74Campbell, T. A. & Marsh, J. E. (2019). On corticopetal-corticofugal loops of the new early filter: from cell assemblies to the rostral brainstem. NeuroReport, 30(3), 202-206Richter, H., Forsman, M., Elcadi, G. H., Brautaset, R., Marsh, J. E. & Zetterberg, C. (2018). Prefrontal cortex activity evoked by convergence load under conflicting stimulus-to-accommodation and stimulus-to-vergence eye-movements measured by NIRS: Prefrontal cortex oxygenation and visual fatigue. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 12, Article ID 298. Sörqvist, P., Dahlström, Ö., Karlsson, T. & Rönnberg, J. (2016). Concentration: the neural underpinnings of how cognitive load shields against distraction. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 10, Article ID 221. Nöstl, A., Sörqvist, P. & Marsh, J. (2013). Attentional Capture by Auditory Events: The role of Expectations. In: : . Paper presented at Cognitive Hearing Science, Linköping, Sweden, June 16-19 2013.
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7584-2275

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