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Richter, H., Domkin, D., Elcadi, G. H., Andersson, H. W., Högberg, H. & Englund, M. (2019). A Comparison of Mental and Visual Load Resulting from Semi-automated and Conventional Forest Forwarding: An Experimental Machine Simulation Study (827ed.). In: Sebastiano Bagnara Riccardo Tartaglia · Sara Albolino Thomas Alexander · Yushi Fujita (Ed.), Bagnara S., Tartaglia R., Albolino S., Alexander T., Fujita Y. (Ed.), Proceedings of the 20th Congress of the International Ergonomics Association (IEA 2018): Volume X: Auditory and Vocal Ergonomics, Visual Ergonomics, Psychophysiology in Ergonomics, Ergonomics in Advanced Imaging. Paper presented at 20th Congress of the International Ergonomics Association, IEA 2018, 26-30 August 2018, Florence, Italy (pp. 199-208). Cham, X
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Comparison of Mental and Visual Load Resulting from Semi-automated and Conventional Forest Forwarding: An Experimental Machine Simulation Study
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2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the 20th Congress of the International Ergonomics Association (IEA 2018): Volume X: Auditory and Vocal Ergonomics, Visual Ergonomics, Psychophysiology in Ergonomics, Ergonomics in Advanced Imaging / [ed] Bagnara S., Tartaglia R., Albolino S., Alexander T., Fujita Y., Cham, 2019, 827, Vol. X, p. 199-208Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the present study was to extend the knowledge offunctional linkages between visual and mental load, performance, and prefrontalcortex (PFC) activity, during forestry forwarding work. Eleven healthy participants,range 21–51 years old, with a minimum of 1-year work experience,carried out the task of loading logs along a standardized path in a machinesimulator during two counterbalanced test conditions: (i) conventional cranecontrol, and; (ii) semi-automated crane control. Mental load was assessed byquantification of oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2) concentration changes overthe right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) via non-invasive functional nearinfrared spectrometry (fNIRS). Visual, autonomic, and motoric control variableswere measured and analyzed in parallel along with the individual level of performance.Linear Mixed Models (LMM) analysis indicated more mental loadduring conventional crane work. Collectively, our data suggest that fNIRS is aviable tool which can be used in neuroergonomic research to evaluate physiologicalactivity levels in PFC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: , 2019 Edition: 827
Series
Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, ISSN 21945357, E-ISSN 2194-5365 ; 827
Keywords
Visual ergonomics, neuroergonomics, Nirs, robotics
National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27848 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-96059-3_22 (DOI)2-s2.0-85051781837 (Scopus ID)978-3-319-96058-6 (ISBN)978-3-319-96059-3 (ISBN)
Conference
20th Congress of the International Ergonomics Association, IEA 2018, 26-30 August 2018, Florence, Italy
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Note

Södra Skogsägarnas Stiftelse för Forskning, Utveckling och Utbildning Grant no: 2009-1761

Available from: 2018-09-05 Created: 2018-09-05 Last updated: 2019-10-02Bibliographically approved
Domkin, D., Forsman, M. & Richter, H. O. (2019). Effect of ciliary-muscle contraction force on trapezius muscle activity during computer mouse work. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 119(2), 389-397
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of ciliary-muscle contraction force on trapezius muscle activity during computer mouse work
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 119, no 2, p. 389-397Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study aimed to identify whether or not an increase in ciliary-muscle contraction force, when the eye-lens is adjusted for viewing at a near distance, result in an increase in trapezius muscle activity, while performing a natural work task. Twelve participants, ranging in age from 21 to 32 years, performed a computer-mouse work task during free gaze conditions. A moving visual target was tracked with a computer mouse on a screen placed at two different distances from the eyes, 25 cm and 50 cm. Tracking performance, eye accommodation, and bilateral trapezius muscle activity were measured continuously. Ciliary-muscle contraction force was computed according to a formula which takes into account the age-dependent, non-linear relationship between contraction force of the ciliary muscle and the produced level of eye accommodation. Generalized Estimating Equations analyses were performed. On the dominant hand side and for the nearest screen distance, there was a significant effect of ciliary-muscle contraction force on the trapezius muscle activity (p<0.001). No other effects were significant (p>0.05). The results support the hypothesis that high visual demands, during computer mouse work, increase ciliary muscle contraction force and contribute to a raise of the sustained level of trapezius muscle activity. The current study specifically clarifies the validity of the relationship between ciliary-muscle contraction force and trapezius muscle activity and demonstrates that this relationship is not due to a general personal trait. We conclude that a high level of ciliary muscle contraction force can contribute to a development of musculoskeletal complaints in the neck-shoulder area.

Keywords
Ciliary-muscle contraction force; Computer mouse work; Electromyography; Eye-accommodation; Trapezius muscle; Visual ergonomics
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26194 (URN)10.1007/s00421-018-4031-8 (DOI)000457735500006 ()30430279 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056460114 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Available from: 2018-03-01 Created: 2018-03-01 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved
Richter, H. & Long, J. (2019). The pitfalls of the traditional office ergonomics model in the current mobile work environment:  Is visual ergonomic health literacy the remedy?. Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, 63(3), 447-456
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The pitfalls of the traditional office ergonomics model in the current mobile work environment:  Is visual ergonomic health literacy the remedy?
2019 (English)In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 63, no 3, p. 447-456Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mobile technology has revolutionised how we work. It is now relatively easy to work anywhere and anytime, but this has placed the onus on mobile (or flexible) workers to set up their own work environment for comfort and ease of use. Vision is an important driver of posture, and hence visual ergonomics principles are integral for setting up digital devices. If mobile workers do not have visual ergonomics knowledge, or are unable to apply visual ergonomics knowledge to appropriately set up their work environment, then they are at risk of developing visual-related occupational health issues due to exposure to adverse physical work environments.

To address this potential health care issue, we propose the introduction of Visual Ergonomics Health Literacy. This would provide mobile workers (including school children) with the knowledge and skills to set up their work environment for comfort and ease of use, wherever they work. It is important to address this issue now before we have a widespread epidemic of discomfort and injury from not applying sound visual ergonomics principles to work environments.

Keywords
Computer; smartphone; visual displays; lighting; design
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29169 (URN)10.3233/WOR-192937 (DOI)000475765000017 ()31256101 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85069455544 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-24 Created: 2019-01-24 Last updated: 2019-08-26Bibliographically approved
Long, J. & Richter, H. (2019). Visual ergonomics on-the-go. Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, 63(3), 321-324
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Visual ergonomics on-the-go
2019 (English)In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 63, no 3, p. 321-324Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29372 (URN)10.3233/WOR-192936 (DOI)000475765000002 ()31256100 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85069507707 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-12 Created: 2019-03-12 Last updated: 2019-08-26Bibliographically approved
Zetterlund, C., Lundqvist, L.-O. & Richter, H. (2019). Visual, musculoskeletal and balance symptoms in individuals with visual impairment and with age-normal vision. Clinical and experimental optometry, 102(1), 63-69
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Visual, musculoskeletal and balance symptoms in individuals with visual impairment and with age-normal vision
2019 (English)In: Clinical and experimental optometry, ISSN 0816-4622, E-ISSN 1444-0938, Vol. 102, no 1, p. 63-69Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Visual impairment is globally among the most prevalent disabilities. Research concerning the health consequences of visual deficits is challenged by confounding effects of age, because visual impairment becomes more prevalent with age. This study investigates the influence of visual deficits on visual, musculoskeletal and balance symptoms in adults with and without visual impairment, while controlling for age effects.

METHODS:

Thirty-nine patients with visual impairment, aged 18-72 years, were compared to 37 age-matched controls with normal vision, allocated to two age groups: < 45 and ≥ 45 years. Self-reported symptoms were measured using the Visual, Musculoskeletal and Balance Symptoms Questionnaire and compared with demographic and optometric variables.

RESULTS:

In total, patients with visual impairment reported more symptoms than age-matched normally sighted controls. Younger adults in the control group were almost free from symptoms, whereas younger adults with visual impairment reported levels of symptoms equal to older adults with visual impairment. Multiple logistic regression modelling identified use of eyeglasses, magnifying aids and presence of anisometropia to be the most influential risk factors for reporting visual, musculoskeletal and balance symptoms, with accentuated influence on balance symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS:

People with visual impairments and people with age-related normal visual deficits are both predisposed to report visual, musculoskeletal and balance symptoms relative to people without visual defects or need for eye-wear correction. Age-related variations in symptoms were observed in the control groups but not in the visual impairment groups, with younger visual impairment patients reporting as many symptoms as older visual impairment patients. These findings indicate a need for a wider interdisciplinary perspective on eye care concerning people with visual impairment and people with need for habitual daily use of eye wear correction.

Keywords
Visual impairment, visual, musculoskeletal and balance symptoms, age differences, optometric measures
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25770 (URN)10.1111/cxo.12806 (DOI)000453531500009 ()29938826 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85052638671 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-12-08 Created: 2017-12-08 Last updated: 2019-11-29Bibliographically approved
Richter, H., Sundin, S. & Long, J. (2019). Visually deficient working conditions and reduced work performance in office workers: Is it mediated by visual well-being and health?. International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, 72, 128-136
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Visually deficient working conditions and reduced work performance in office workers: Is it mediated by visual well-being and health?
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, ISSN 0169-8141, E-ISSN 1872-8219, Vol. 72, p. 128-136Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The main purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate whether visual well-being and health act as a mediating factor between perceived visual ergonomic working conditions and self-rated visual performance among office workers who perform administrative tasks and computer-based work at the Swedish Tax Agency.

Methods: A questionnaire was sent to 94 office workers addressing: 1) perceived visual quality of the visual display units; 2) prevalence of eye symptoms; and 3) self-rated visual performance. Eighty-six persons (54 women (63 %), 31 men (36 %), and 1 of unspecified sex) answered the questionnaire. Multiple regression analysis investigated the association between visual ergonomic working conditions and visual performance, with and without visual well-being and health as a mediator.

Results: The group mean of the Indexed survey questions indicated reasonably good quality visual ergonomic working conditions, a relative absence of eye symptoms, and acceptable self-rated visual performance. Results from multiple regression analysis showed a significant association between perceived visual ergonomic working conditions and self-rated visual performance (r2 = 0.30, β = 0.327, p < 0.01). When visual well-being and health was used as a mediator, the association between perceived visual ergonomic working conditions and self-rated visual performance remained the same (r2 = 0.32, β = 0.315, p < 0.01).

Discussion: It was surprising to discover that self-rated visual performance  was independent of visual health and well-being. Possible explanations include exposure factors not included in the current study, such as dry air and sensory irritation in eyes, psychosocial stress, time spent performing near work activities or time exposed to visually deficient working conditions. The strong connection between satisfaction with visual ergonomics work conditions and productivity found in this study has implications for workplace profitability and staff satisfaction. If productivity of office workers is improved by better visual ergonomics work conditions, then managers within workplaces may be able to improve work outcomes by optimizing the physical work environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Performance, well-being, mediation analysis, visual ergonomics
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-28658 (URN)10.1016/j.ergon.2019.05.007 (DOI)000482508600013 ()2-s2.0-85065788410 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-26 Created: 2018-11-26 Last updated: 2019-11-25Bibliographically approved
Richter, H., Domkin, D., Elcadi, G. H., Anderson, H. W., Högberg, H. & Englund, M. (2018). A comparison of mental and visual loads resulting from semi-automated and conventional forest harvesting: An experimental machine simulation study. In: : . Paper presented at IEA 2018 - 20th Congress International Ergonomics Association - Florence, 26th - 30th August 2018, Florence, Italy.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparison of mental and visual loads resulting from semi-automated and conventional forest harvesting: An experimental machine simulation study
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2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This study is concerned with a new method for partly automating forestry harvesting work. Work-related injuries and constant demands for a higher productivity are two of the many arguments for why forestry work must be improved. Forestry work places great mental demands on the driver because they must continuously evaluate and act on relevant parts in a heavy visual information flow. Against this background the purpose of the present study was to extend the knowledge of functional linkages between visual and mental fatigue, performance, and prefrontal cortex activity, during semi-automated and conventional forestry harvesting work. Eleven healthy participants, range 21–51 years old, with a minimum of 1-year work experience, carried out the task of loading logs along a standardized path in a machine simulator during two counterbalanced 45-min periods: (i) conventional forest harvesting, and; (ii) semi-automated forest harvesting. Equal emphasizes was put on accuracy and speed. During manual forest harvesting the driver controlled the crane arm, used to load logs into the load space of the forest vehicle (“forwarder”), by manually operating the joysticks and so guide the crane to the location of the log and then back to the load space. During semi-automatic forest harvesting the driver moved the crane with the press of a button to a pre-programmed location near the log and then, after another button press, to a pre-programmed location within the load space. The following joystick usage parameters were considered for the statistical analysis: Sequential work cycle number, work phase (1-loading in basket, 2-movement to log, 3-picking up log, 4-movement to load space), number of simultaneously used controls across samples of one phase, number of direction changes of joystick movements per phase. Mental load was assessed by quantification of oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2) concentration changes over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) via non-invasive functional near infrared spectrometry (fFNIRS: PortaLite mini, Artinis Medical Systems, Zetten, the Netherlands). The frequency and duration of horizontal amplitudes of eye/head/neck angles was assessed continuously with 8 SmartEye cameras and used as a measure of visual load. NASA-TLX and Borg CRS was used to assess perceived mental and physical fatigue. Linear Mixed Model will be used to test and to analyze the effect of the duration of work, joystick usage, work type (manual or semi-automated) and perceived mental and physical effort on the outcome of oxygenated hemoglobin concentration. This study contributes with new knowledge of the consequences of the current increase in automation. The 4th industrial revolution can have tremendous implications on how we perceive and organize work in the future, but little is still known about the impact on human body and brain.

National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25769 (URN)
Conference
IEA 2018 - 20th Congress International Ergonomics Association - Florence, 26th - 30th August 2018, Florence, Italy
Projects
Skogsmaskinförares mentala och fysiska belastningsnivåer under arbete med delautomatiserad skotarkran – en experimentell studie i skogsmaskinsimulator (MentAuto)
Note

Abstract submitted to: IEA 2018 - 20th Congress International Ergonomics Association - Florence, 26th - 30th August 2018

Available from: 2017-12-08 Created: 2017-12-08 Last updated: 2019-12-05Bibliographically approved
Richter, H., Domkin, D., Elcadi, G. H., Andersson, H., Högberg, H., Forsman, M. & Englund, M. (2018). A comparsion of mental and visual loads resulting from semi-automated and conventional forest harvesting: An experimental machine simulation study. In: Per Lindberg (Ed.), FALF Konferens 2018: Arbetet - problem eller potential för en hållbar livsmiljö?: Program och Abstracts. Paper presented at FALF KONFERENS 2018 'Arbetet - problem eller potential för en hållbar livsmiljö?',10-12 juni 2018, Gävle (pp. 96). Gävle: Gävle Universtiy Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparsion of mental and visual loads resulting from semi-automated and conventional forest harvesting: An experimental machine simulation study
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2018 (English)In: FALF Konferens 2018: Arbetet - problem eller potential för en hållbar livsmiljö?: Program och Abstracts / [ed] Per Lindberg, Gävle: Gävle Universtiy Press , 2018, p. 96-Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This study is concerned with a new method for partly automating forestry harvesting work. Work-related injuries and constant demands for a higher productivity are two of the many arguments for why forestry work must be improved. Forestry work places great mental demands on the driver because they must continuously evaluate and act on relevant parts in a heavy visual information flow. Against this background the purpose of the present study was to extend the knowledge of functional linkages between visual and mental fatigue, performance, and prefrontal cortex activity, during semi-automated and conventional forestry harvesting work. Eleven healthy participants, range 21–51 years old, with a minimum of 1-year work experience, carried out the task of loading logs along a standardized path in a machine simulator during two counterbalanced 45-min periods: (i) conventional forest harvesting, and; (ii) semi-automated forest harvesting. Equal emphasizes was put on accuracy and speed. During manual forest harvesting the driver controlled the crane arm, used to load logs into the load space of the forest vehicle (“forwarder”), by manually operating the joysticks and so guide the crane to the location of the log and then back to the load space. During semi-automatic forest harvesting the driver moved the crane with the press of a button to a pre-programmed location near the log and then, after another button press, to a pre-programmed location within the load space. The following joystick usage parameters were considered for the statistical analysis: Sequential work cycle number, work phase (1-loading in basket, 2-movement to log, 3-picking up log, 4-movement to load space), number of simultaneously used controls across samples of one phase, number of direction changes of joystick movements per phase. Mental load was assessed by quantification of oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2) concentration changes over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) via non-invasive functional near infrared spectrometry (fFNIRS: PortaLite mini, Artinis Medical Systems, Zetten, the Netherlands). The frequency and duration of horizontal amplitudes of eye/head/neck angles was assessed continuously with 8 SmartEye cameras and used as a measure of visual load. NASA-TLX and Borg CRS was used to assess perceived mental and physical fatigue. Linear Mixed Model will be used to test and to analyze the effect of the duration of work, joystick usage, work type (manual or semi-automated) and perceived mental and physical effort on the outcome of oxygenated hemoglobin concentration. This study contributes with new knowledge of the consequences of the current increase in automation. The 4th industrial revolution can have tremendous implications on how we perceive and organize work in the future, but little is still known about the impact on human body and brain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Gävle: Gävle Universtiy Press, 2018
National Category
Health Sciences Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27224 (URN)978-91-88145-28-4 (ISBN)
Conference
FALF KONFERENS 2018 'Arbetet - problem eller potential för en hållbar livsmiljö?',10-12 juni 2018, Gävle
Projects
MentAuto
Available from: 2018-06-20 Created: 2018-06-20 Last updated: 2019-12-05Bibliographically approved
Richter, H., Forsman, M., Elcadi, G. H., Brautaset, R., Marsh, J. E. & Zetterberg, C. (2018). Prefrontal cortex activity evoked by convergence load under conflicting stimulus-to-accommodation and stimulus-to-vergence eye-movements measured by NIRS: Prefrontal cortex oxygenation and visual fatigue. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 12, Article ID 298.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prefrontal cortex activity evoked by convergence load under conflicting stimulus-to-accommodation and stimulus-to-vergence eye-movements measured by NIRS: Prefrontal cortex oxygenation and visual fatigue
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5161, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 12, article id 298Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To extend our knowledge of the functional linkages between visual fatigueand regional cerebral prefrontal cortex (PFC) oxygenation, we measured time related hemodynamic changes over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) duringconvergence load under conflicting stimulus-to-accommodation and stimulus-tovergence eye movements with and without concurrent mental load.

Methods: Twenty healthy participants with a median age of 28 years (range:18–44 years) fixated upon a vertical bar presented separately to the left andright eyes, using polarized filters, during four counterbalanced 10-min periods:(i) no accommodation/vergence conflict (Control, Ctrl); (ii) added convergenceload and accommodation/vergence conflict (Conv); (iii) added cognitive load only(Cog) and; (iv) a combination of added cognitive and convergence load andaccommodation/vergence conflict (Cc). Viewing distance was 65 cm. Non-invasivemeasurements of hemodynamic activity over the dlPFC were quantified by functionalnear-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). During the two-convergence load conditions, thehorizontal disparity of the two bars varied dynamically from no disparity to a disparityset 20% below the individual threshold for diplopia. Cognitive load was induced by then-back-2 test which required the subject to memorize and recall the changing colorsof the horizontal bars and decide when a given color was the same as that occurring two colors previously. fNIRS data were averaged over 10-s windows centered at 0, 2,4, 6, 8, and 10 min of each task, subtracted from a 20-s baseline window immediatelypreceding the visual task, and then represented as changes in oxygenated hemoglobin(ΔHbO2); deoxygenated hemoglobin (ΔHHb) and total hemoglobin (ΔtHb).

Results: Linear mixed model analyses showed that hemodynamic activity wassystematically influenced by time (p < 0.001). The group-averaged time-related levelof change across the viewing conditions did not differ when compared with one another(p > 0.05). Larger convergence eye-movement responses under conflicting stimulus-to accommodation,and stimulus-to-vergence over time, increased ΔHbO2 and ΔtHb onlyin condition Cc and after 8 min of task time (p < 0.10 for min-6 and min-8: p < 0.05 for min-10).

Discussion: Collectively, our data suggest that HbO2, HHb, and tHb, recorded over the dlPFC with fNIRS, can be used to assay the degree to which supervisory oculomotorcontrol processes are activated during visually deficient near work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
Visual fatigue, Accommodation, Compensatory effort, Convergence, Disparity, Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS), Time series analysis, Visual ergonomics
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25766 (URN)10.3389/fnhum.2018.00298 (DOI)000440216100002 ()30104967 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054772976 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761Swedish Research Council, 2015-01116
Note

Corrigendum: Prefrontal Cortex Oxygenation Evoked by Convergence Load Under Conflicting Stimulus-to-Accommodation and Stimulus-to-Vergence Eye-Movements Measured by NIRS DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2018.00384

ScopusId: 2-s2.0-85054817559ISI-id: 000445088000001 PubMedID: 30271336

Available from: 2017-12-08 Created: 2017-12-08 Last updated: 2019-08-28Bibliographically approved
Zetterberg, C., Forsman, M. & Richter, H. O. (2017). Neck/shoulder discomfort due to visually demanding near work is influenced by previous neck pain, task duration, astigmatism, eye discomfort and accommodation. PLoS ONE, 12(8), Article ID e0182439.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neck/shoulder discomfort due to visually demanding near work is influenced by previous neck pain, task duration, astigmatism, eye discomfort and accommodation
2017 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 8, article id e0182439Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Visually demanding near work can cause eye discomfort, and eye and neck/shoulder discomfort during, e.g., computer work are associated. Here, to investigate direct effects of experimental near work on eye and neck/shoulder discomfort, 33 individuals with chronic neck pain and 33 healthy control subjects performed four visual tasks, rating eye and neck/shoulder discomfort at baseline and after each task. The cumulative performance time (reflected in the temporal order of the tasks), astigmatism, concurrent eye discomfort, and extent of accommodation all aggravated neck/shoulder discomfort. There was an interaction effect between the temporal order and eye discomfort: participants with a greater mean increase in eye discomfort also developed more neck/shoulder discomfort with time. Since moderate musculoskeletal symptoms are a risk factor for more severe symptoms, it is important to ensure a good visual environment in occupations involving visually demanding near work.

Keywords
astigmatism, computer vision syndrome, musculoskeletal disorder, oculomotor load, visual ergonomics
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-21513 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0182439 (DOI)000408355800023 ()28832612 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85029224358 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2005-0488Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Available from: 2016-04-19 Created: 2016-05-20 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Projects
Forte-centre Working Life: The Body at Work - from problem to potential [2009-01761_Forte]; University of Gävle; Publications
Hallman, D., Holtermann, A., Dencker-Larsen, S., Birk Jorgensen, M. & Nørregaard Rasmussen, C. (2019). Are trajectories of neck-shoulder pain associated with sick leave and work ability in workers? A 1-year prospective study. BMJ Open, 9(e022006)Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E., van der Beek, A., Jackson, J. & Coenen, P. (2019). Calibration of self-reported time spent sitting, standing and walking among office workers: a compositional data analysis. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(17), Article ID 3111. Jackson, J., Srinivasan, D. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2019). Consistent individual motor variability traits demonstrated by females performing a long-cycle assembly task under conditions differing in temporal organisation. Applied ErgonomicsDomkin, D., Forsman, M. & Richter, H. O. (2019). Effect of ciliary-muscle contraction force on trapezius muscle activity during computer mouse work. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 119(2), 389-397Bohman, T., Bottai, M. & Björklund, M. (2019). Predictive models for short-term and long-term improvement in women under physiotherapy for chronic disabling neck pain: a longitudinal cohort study. BMJ Open, 9(4), Article ID e024557. Holtermann, A., Mathiassen, S. E. & Straker, L. (2019). Promoting health and physical capacity during productive work: the Goldilocks Principle. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 45(1), 90-97Hallman, D., Holtermann, A., Björklund, M., Gupta, N. & Nørregaard Rasmussen, C. D. (2019). Sick leave due to musculoskeletal pain : determinants of distinct trajectories over 1 year. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 92(8), 1099-1108Gupta, N., Heiden, M., Mathiassen, S. E. & Holtermann, A. (2018). Is self-reported time spent sedentary and in physical activity differentially biased by age, gender, body mass index and low-back pain?. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 44(2), 163-170Richter, H., Forsman, M., Elcadi, G. H., Brautaset, R., Marsh, J. E. & Zetterberg, C. (2018). Prefrontal cortex activity evoked by convergence load under conflicting stimulus-to-accommodation and stimulus-to-vergence eye-movements measured by NIRS: Prefrontal cortex oxygenation and visual fatigue. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 12, Article ID 298. Trask, C., Mathiassen, S. E., Rostami, M. & Heiden, M. (2017). Observer variability in posture assessment from video recordings: the effect of partly visible periods. Applied Ergonomics, 60, 275-281
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7680-1929

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