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Forinder, Ulla
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Hultman, L., Forinder, U., Öhrvall, A.-M., Pergert, P. & Fugl-Meyer, K. (2019). Elusive Participation – Social Workers’ Experience of the Participation of Children with Disabilities in LSS Assessments. Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research (1), 38-48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elusive Participation – Social Workers’ Experience of the Participation of Children with Disabilities in LSS Assessments
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2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, no 1, p. 38-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of Swedish social workers’ experience of disabled children’s participation, to discover in what ways their knowledge about impairment and disability, combined with legal literacy and local context influence children’s participation in formal meetings and decision making. Seven focus-group interviews were conducted with 35 municipal social workers from communities in different parts of Sweden. The phenomenological analysis resulted in the overarching theme of elusive participation, in which participation was described as difficult to grasp both in relation to what was supposed to be achieved and what it was meant to result in. Elusive participation entailed a discrepancy between policy and practice, norms and perception of normality, conflicting perspectives and needs, judgment of children’s abilities. These findings underline the importance of creating safe spaces in which social workers have the opportunity for critical reflections and shared discussions about social work practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm University Press, 2019
Keywords
children; disabilities; social workers; participation; decision-making; disability legislation
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29320 (URN)10.16993/sjdr.558 (DOI)000477958500004 ()2-s2.0-85064679341 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-02-21 Created: 2019-02-21 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved
Lundberg, T., Forinder, U., Olsson, M., Fürst, C. J., Årestedt, K. & Alvariza, A. (2018). Bereavement stressors and psychosocial well-being of young adults following the loss of a parent – A cross-sectional survey. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 35, 33-38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bereavement stressors and psychosocial well-being of young adults following the loss of a parent – A cross-sectional survey
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2018 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 35, p. 33-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The knowledge about young adults who have lost a parent to cancer is limited, and to reach a broader understanding about this group, this study used the Dual Process Model of Coping with Bereavement (Stroebe and Schut, 1999) as a theoretical framework. The purpose of this study was to describe loss- and restoration-oriented bereavement stressors and psychosocial wellbeing of young adults following the loss of a parent to cancer. Method: This survey used baseline data from a longitudinal study. Young adults, aged 16–28 years, who lost a parent to cancer more than two months earlier and agreed to participate in support groups held at three palliative care services in Sweden, responded to a comprehensive theory-based study-specific questionnaire. Results: Altogether, 77 young adults (64 women and 13 men) answered the questionnaire an average of five-to-eight months after the loss. Twenty percent (n = 15) had not been aware of their parent's impending death at all or only knew a few hours before the death, and 65% (n = 50) did not expect the death when it occurred. The young adults reported low self-esteem (n = 58, 76%), mild to severe anxiety (n = 55, 74%), mild to severe depression (n = 23, 31%) and low life satisfaction. Conclusion: Young adults reported overall poor psychosocial wellbeing following bereavement. The unexpectedness and unawareness of the parent's imminent death, i.e., loss-oriented bereavement stressors, might influence psychosocial wellbeing. Despite these reports, restoration-oriented stressors, such as support from family and friends, helped them to cope with the loss.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Churchill Livingstone, 2018
Keywords
Bereavement, Cancer, Palliative care, Parental death, Psychosocial, Young adult, adolescent, adult, anxiety, article, conceptual framework, controlled study, female, friend, human, life satisfaction, longitudinal study, major clinical study, male, palliative therapy, process model, questionnaire, self esteem, support group, Sweden, theoretical study, wellbeing
National Category
Social Work Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26787 (URN)10.1016/j.ejon.2018.05.004 (DOI)000441490600005 ()2-s2.0-85047055134 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-05 Created: 2018-06-05 Last updated: 2018-09-05Bibliographically approved
Rooth, H., Piuva, K., Forinder, U. & Söderbäck, M. (2018). Competent parents with natural children: parent and child identities in manual-based parenting courses in Sweden. Childhood, 25(3), 369-384
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Competent parents with natural children: parent and child identities in manual-based parenting courses in Sweden
2018 (English)In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 369-384Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article analyses identity constructions in two manual-based universal parenting training programmes in Sweden, Connect (U) and All Children in Focus (ABC). The analysis was performed with discourse analysis of oral messages during parent training courses. The findings revealed that the parents’ subject positions altered between troubled and good while the children’s subject positions altered between ambiguous and natural in a confessional discourse of uncertainty and competence. Conclusively, pastoral power operated to support parental self-reflexivity and adult control in a process to improve parenting skills.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Children, discourses of parenting training, parents, public health, social services, Sweden, adult, article, child, child parent relation, discourse analysis, human, identity, skill, social work, training, uncertainty
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26389 (URN)10.1177/0907568218759586 (DOI)000439350900008 ()2-s2.0-85043341300 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-03 Created: 2018-04-03 Last updated: 2018-11-27Bibliographically approved
Vogel, G., Forinder, U., Sandgren, A., Svensen, C. & Joelsson-Alm, E. (2018). Health-related quality of life after general surgical intensive care. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, 62(8), 1112-1119
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health-related quality of life after general surgical intensive care
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2018 (English)In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 62, no 8, p. 1112-1119Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Impaired mental and physical health are common complications after intensive care that could influence the patient's health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Earlier research has mainly focused on HRQoL in mixed surgical and medical ICU populations. This study aimed to describe and analyze factors associated with HROoL after discharge from a general surgical ICU.

METHODS: A prospective cohort study was conducted in a general surgical ICU in Sweden between 2005 and 2012. Adult patients (≥18 years) with an ICU length of stay ≥96 hours were included. HRQoL was measured at 3, 6, and 12 months after discharge from the ICU using a questionnaire (SF-36). A linear mixed model was used to analyze changes over time and Wilcoxon Signed Rank Tests were used to compare the 12-months results to an age and gender matched reference population in Sweden. Linear regression analyses were performed to explore the impact on HRQoL from background variables.

RESULTS: Of 447 patients eligible for the study, 276 patients (62%) answered SF-36 at least once at 3, 6 or 12 months after ICU care and were included in the study. HRQoL improved over time but was still significantly lower at 12 months compared to the reference population. Female gender, age <75 years, living single, and ICU-stay of more than 14 days were associated with lower HRQoL.

CONCLUSION: General surgical ICU patients reports low HRQoL 1 year after ICU stay. The impaired HRQoL could be a long-lasting problem with major consequences for the individual, family, and society.

Keywords
SF-36, critical care, health related quality of life, intensive care unit
National Category
Nursing Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26747 (URN)10.1111/aas.13139 (DOI)000440897800012 ()29687441 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85051198820 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-04 Created: 2018-06-04 Last updated: 2018-09-05Bibliographically approved
Hultman, L., Forinder, U., Fugl-Meyer, K. & Pergert, P. (2018). Maintaining professional integrity: experiences of case workers performing the assessments that determine children’s access to personal assistance. Disability & Society, 33(6), 909-931
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maintaining professional integrity: experiences of case workers performing the assessments that determine children’s access to personal assistance
2018 (English)In: Disability & Society, ISSN 0968-7599, E-ISSN 1360-0508, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 909-931Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This qualitative study explores Swedish case workers experiences of decision making regarding disabled children's right to obtain assistance in their everyday life whereby they can live independently in the community. Data collection included seven focus-group interviews and 11 complementary individual interviews with case workers from different agencies responsible for decisions regardig access to personal assistance. Grounded theory methodology was used. Compromised professional integrity under shifting conditions emerged as a main concern and maintaing professional integrity was used as an approach to resolve it. The case workers are maintaining professional integrity by applying different strategies; struggling with division of responsibility, bureaucratizig, and justifying and protecting. The results indicate that present application of assessment criteria in combination with the utilization of precedent rulings has made it difficult for the case workers to make decisions that provide children access to assistance. Current practice raises questions about the case workers perspectives of professionalism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
case workers, decision making, disabled children, grounded theory, Personal assistance, professionalism, article, child, handicapped child, human, responsibility, social worker
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26756 (URN)10.1080/09687599.2018.1466691 (DOI)000434328200006 ()2-s2.0-85046467915 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies:

- Norrbacka-Eugenia Stiftelsen  

- Stiftelsen Allmana Barnhuset grant no: 4-166 

Available from: 2018-06-04 Created: 2018-06-04 Last updated: 2018-11-27Bibliographically approved
Rooth, H., Forinder, U., Söderbäck, M., Viitasara, E. & Piuva, K. (2018). Trusted and doubted: Discourses of parenting training in two Swedish official inquiries, 1947 and 2008.. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 46(20_Suppl. 1), 59-65
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trusted and doubted: Discourses of parenting training in two Swedish official inquiries, 1947 and 2008.
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2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 46, no 20_Suppl. 1, p. 59-65Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of this study was to analyse discourses of parenting training in official inquires in Sweden that explicitly deal with the bringing up of children and parental education and how the representations of the problems and their solutions affect parental subject positions in the early welfare state and at the onset of the 21st century. Method: We carried out a discourse analysis of two public inquiries of 1947 and 2008, drawing on theories about governmentality and power regimes. Tools from political discourse analysis were used to investigate the objectives of political discourse practices. Results: Both inquiries referred to a context of change and new life demands as a problem. Concerning suggestions for solutions, there were discrepancies in parents’ estimated need of expert knowledge and in descriptions of parental capacity. In a discourse of trust and doubt, the parents in 1947 were positioned as trusted welfare partners and secure raisers of future generations, and in 2008, as doubted adults, feared to be faltering in their child-rearing tasks. Conclusions: The analysis revealed how governmental problem descriptions, reasoning about causes and suggestions of solutions influenced parents’ subject positions in a discourse of trust and doubt, and made way for governmental interventions with universal parenting training in the 21st century.

Keywords
child rearing, family policy, parental support, parenting training, political discourse analysis (PDA), public health, social welfare, Sweden
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26395 (URN)10.1177/1403494817747168 (DOI)000428758300009 ()29552973 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044128662 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-03 Created: 2018-04-03 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
Gyllström Krekula, L., Forinder, U. & Tibell, A. (2018). What do people agree to when stating willingness to donate?: On the medical interventions enabling organ donation after death. PLoS ONE, 13(8), Article ID e0202544.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What do people agree to when stating willingness to donate?: On the medical interventions enabling organ donation after death
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 8, article id e0202544Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose of the study

The purpose of this study is to explore donor relatives’ experiences of the medical interventions enabling organ donation, as well as to examine the donor relatives’ attitudes towards donating their own organs, and whether or not their experiences have influenced their own inclination to donate.

Methods

The experiences of donor relatives were explored via in-depth interviews. The interviews covered every step from the deceased family member being struck by a severe bleeding in the brain till after the organ recovery, including the medical interventions enabling organ donation. The interviews were analysed through qualitative and quantitative content analysis.

Results

Brain death and organ donation proved to be hard to understand for many donor relatives. The prolonged interventions provided after death in order to enable organ donation misled some relatives to believe that their family member still was alive. In general, the understanding for what treatment aimed at saving the family member and what interventions aimed at maintaining organ viability was low. However, most donor relatives were either inspired to, or reinforced in their willingness to, donate their own organs after having experienced the loss of a family member who donated organs.

Conclusions

There is a need for greater transparency regarding the whole chain of events during the donation process. Yet, having experienced the donation process closely did not discourage the donor relatives from donating their own organs–but rather inspired a willingness to donate. This indicates an acceptance of the medical procedures necessary in order to enable organ donation after death.

National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27862 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0202544 (DOI)000442722500017 ()30142168 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85052239191 (Scopus ID)
Note

The interviews (data) are stored in a locked and secure place at Karolinska University Hospital, according to the policy at the hospital and the Karolinska Institutet. The participants of the study have not consented to the public sharing of the interviews as this could jeopardize their guaranteed anonymity. For ethical reasons and reasons of integrity, the transcribed interviews can only be provided after the removal of all personal data and other sensitive information. Furthermore, an additional – and approved – ethics application is needed. For data request, please contact the head of department, Carl Johan Sundberg at the Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics (LIME), Karolinska Institutet, by e-mail to: Carl.J.Sundberg@ki.se.

LGK received financial support from: Svensk Njurmedicinsk Förening, Patient Organisation, www.njurmed.se; Stiftelsen Professor Lars-Erik Gelins, Minnesfond, Foundation in memory of Professor Lars-Erik Gelin, www.gelinfonden.org;L. Jacobssons testamente, foundation in memory of L. Jacobsson; and Stiftelsen Stig och Gunborg Westman, private foundation, www.stiftelsemedel.se/stiftelsen-stig-och-gunborg-westman-fr-forskning-kring-njursjukdomar-organtransplantation-och-organdonation.

Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-09-24Bibliographically approved
Rooth, H., Forinder, U., Piuva, K. & Söderbäck, M. (2017). An Assessment of Two Parenting Training Manuals Used in Swedish Parenting Interventions. Children & society, 31(6), 510-522
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Assessment of Two Parenting Training Manuals Used in Swedish Parenting Interventions
2017 (English)In: Children & society, ISSN 0951-0605, E-ISSN 1099-0860, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 510-522Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Sweden, all parents of children aged 0–18 years are entitled to attend free parenting courses as part of a national strategy presented by the Government in 2009. This broad parental support welfare strategy is expected to fulfil the intentions of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. In this study, two parenting training manuals were analysed: the Canadian Connect program, based on attachment theory, and the Swedish ABC program, based on social learning theory. The results indicate that the manuals use strategies that can both hinder and support children's rights, regardless of rhetoric of children's best interests.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2017
Keywords
children, children's rights, parenting, policy and practise, welfare, child, child parent relation, human, Social Learning Theory, theoretical model
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25417 (URN)10.1111/chso.12220 (DOI)000412231600008 ()2-s2.0-85017356539 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-17 Created: 2017-10-17 Last updated: 2018-11-27Bibliographically approved
Oborn, H., Forinder, U. & Herthelius, M. (2017). Health-related quality of life in children with cronic kidney deisease, comparsions between parent and child reports. Pediatric nephrology (Berlin, West), 32(9), 1794
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health-related quality of life in children with cronic kidney deisease, comparsions between parent and child reports
2017 (English)In: Pediatric nephrology (Berlin, West), ISSN 0931-041X, E-ISSN 1432-198X, Vol. 32, no 9, p. 1794-Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: We aimed to assess health related quality of life (HRQoL) in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or a kid-ney transplant (CKD-T) from the perspective of their parents (proxy ratings). Additionally, the parental life satisfaction was evaluated aswell as its possible associations with HRQoL of their children.

Material and methods: Sixty parents to children with CKD stage 3–5 or CKD-T participated. HRQoL in children was assessed by parent proxy versions of the generic instruments Kidscreen-27 and Disabkids-37. Parents own life satisfaction was measured by self-reported LiSat-11 questionnaire.

Results: In most areas parent proxy ratings were significantly lower thanratings by the children themselves. Female sex and older age were associated with lower HRQoL. Compared with proxy ratings by parents to children in the general population, proxy ratings of HRQoL in children with CKD and CKD-T were significantly lower in the domains Physical Well-being, Psychological Well-being, Social inclusion, Social exclusion, and in overall score. Compared with general population, parents in the study rated their own life satisfaction lower in the domains Life as a whole, Leisure and Contacts. Mothers’ life satisfaction were lower than  fathers’in domains Life as a whole and Leisure.

Conclusions: The agreement between parent and child reports of HRQoL was generally poor. Parent ratings of HRQoL in children with CKD seemed to correlate with parents own life satisfaction. The differences between parent and child ratings should be considered in clinical practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
National Category
Social Work Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25748 (URN)000408418900466 ()
Available from: 2017-12-06 Created: 2017-12-06 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Olsson, M., Lundberg, T., Fürst, C. J., Öhlén, J. & Forinder, U. (2017). Psychosocial Well-Being of Young People Who Participated in a Support Group Following the Loss of a Parent to Cancer. Journal of Social Work in End-of-Life and Palliative Care, 13(1), 44-60
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychosocial Well-Being of Young People Who Participated in a Support Group Following the Loss of a Parent to Cancer
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Social Work in End-of-Life and Palliative Care, ISSN 1552-4256, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 44-60Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite the evidence of unmet support needs among young people who have lost a parent to cancer, only a few support group initiatives have been reported. This observational prospective study explored the psychosocial well-being of young people who participated in support groups at a Swedish specialist palliative care setting. On three occasions, 29 participants, aged 16–28 years, answered questionnaires covering characteristics of the participants, circumstances of the losses, psychosocial well-being of the young people, and their own assessment of the support groups. The support groups attracted mostly young women who were often unprepared for the loss. The living arrangements differed between younger and older participants; however, the loss-related variables did not differ. Significant positive changes were found regarding a sense of meaning in their future life and life satisfaction. The helpfulness of the group was assessed as high/very high and the group brought a valuable fellowship with others in a similar situation. Universality and beneficial interactions were reported and strengthened psychosocial well-being developed over time. This change, according to the young people themselves, may be attributed to the group support. The findings are useful for planning interventions to support young people in bereavement in order to enhance their psychosocial well-being.

Keywords
Adolescents; bereavement; psychosocial well-being; support groups; young adults
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23679 (URN)10.1080/15524256.2016.1261755 (DOI)000396610200011 ()28140778 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85011290945 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies:

Erling Persson Family Foundation

Clas Groschinsky's Memorial Fund 

Available from: 2017-02-24 Created: 2017-02-24 Last updated: 2018-07-04Bibliographically approved
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