hig.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Publications (10 of 75) Show all publications
Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E., Bjärntoft, S., Jahncke, H., Hartig, T. & Hallman, D. (2023). A Work Time Control Tradeoff in Flexible Work: Competitive Pathways to Need for Recovery. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 20(1), Article ID 691.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Work Time Control Tradeoff in Flexible Work: Competitive Pathways to Need for Recovery
Show others...
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 691Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Work time control may offer opportunities, but also implies risks for employee recovery, influenced by increased work-related ICT use and overtime work. However, this risk–opportunity tradeoff remains understudied. This study aimed to test two different models of associations between work time control, work-related ICT use, overtime work, and the need for recovery. These models were constructed based on data on office workers with flexible work arrangements. Cross-sectional data were obtained with questionnaires (n = 2582) from employees in a Swedish multi-site organization. Regression models treated the three determinants of the need for recovery either as independent, or as linked in a causal sequence. The test of independent determinants confirmed that more work time control was associated with less need for recovery, whereas more ICT use and overtime work were associated with a higher need for recovery. In a test of serial mediation, more work time control contributed to a greater need for recovery through more ICT use and then more overtime work. Work time control also had a competitive, indirect effect through a negative association with overtime work. Our results suggest that work time control is beneficial for employee recovery, but may for some be associated with more work-related ICT use after regular working hours, thus increasing recovery needs. Policies that support work time control can promote recovery, but employers must attend to the risk of excessive use of ICT outside of regular working hours.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
occupational health, job autonomy, digitalization, working conditions, working times
National Category
Work Sciences
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work, Flexibelt arbete; Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40639 (URN)10.3390/ijerph20010691 (DOI)000909151200001 ()36613009 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85145979290 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009–1761Swedish Transport Administration, 2015/92392
Available from: 2022-12-30 Created: 2022-12-30 Last updated: 2023-01-26Bibliographically approved
Mixter, S., Mathiassen, S. E., Jahncke, H., Hygge, S., Lyskov, E., Hallman, D. & Lewis, C. (2023). Effects of combining occupationally relevant physical and cognitive tasks. A systematic review. Annals of Work Exposures and Health, 67(3), 303-319
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of combining occupationally relevant physical and cognitive tasks. A systematic review
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Annals of Work Exposures and Health, ISSN 2398-7308 , E-ISSN 2398-7316 , Vol. 67, no 3, p. 303-319Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

Physical and cognitive tasks occur together in many occupations. Previous reviews of combined tasks have mainly focused on their effects in a sports context. This review investigated to which extent combinations (concurrent or alternating) of occupationally relevant physical and cognitive tasks influence responses reflecting biomechanical exposure, stress, fatigue, performance, and well-being.

Methods

We searched Scopus, Pubmed, Cinahl, and Psychinfo for controlled experiments investigating the effects of combinations of occupationally relevant physical and cognitive tasks in participants aged 18 to 70. In total, we identified 12 447 records. We added recent papers that had cited these studies (n = 573) to arrive at a total of 13 020 publications. After screening for relevance, 61 studies remained, of which 57 were classified to be of medium or high quality. Of the 57 studies, 51 addressed concurrent tasks, 5 alternating tasks, and 1 both concurrent and alternating tasks.

Results

Most studies of concurrent physical and cognitive tasks reported negative effects, if numerically small, on indicators of biomechanical exposure, fatigue, and performance, compared to a physical task alone. Results were mixed for stress indicators, and well-being was too little studied to justify any conclusions. Effects depended on the tasks, including their intensity and complexity. Alternating physical and cognitive tasks did not appear to influence outcomes much, compared to having passive breaks in-between physical tasks.

Conclusions

The reviewed evidence indicated that concurrent physical and cognitive work tasks have negative, yet small effects on biomechanical indicators, fatigue and performance, compared to performing the physical task alone, but only if the physical task is intense, and the cognitive task is complex. Alternating between physical and cognitive tasks may have similar effects as breaking up physical tasks by passive breaks, but studies were few. Future studies should address ecologically valid combinations of physical and cognitive tasks, in particular in controlled field studies devoted to the long-term effects of combined work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford Academic, 2023
Keywords
Physical work, Cognitive work, Fatigue, Stress, Performance
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work; Intelligent Industry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-38363 (URN)10.1093/annweh/wxac082 (DOI)000893669000001 ()36469430 (PubMedID)
Funder
AFA Insurance, 120223
Available from: 2022-03-31 Created: 2022-03-31 Last updated: 2023-03-16Bibliographically approved
Larsson, J., Vinberg, S. & Jahncke, H. (2022). Changing the Office Design to Activity-Based Flexible Offices: A Longitudinal Study of How Managers’ Leadership Behaviours Are Perceived. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 19(20), Article ID 13557.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changing the Office Design to Activity-Based Flexible Offices: A Longitudinal Study of How Managers’ Leadership Behaviours Are Perceived
2022 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 20, article id 13557Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This longitudinal study examines the impact of office type on employees’ perception of managers’ leadership behaviours, which is an unexplored area. The expanding research related to activity-based flexible offices (AFOs) has mainly focused on employees’ working conditions and health outcomes, not on the changes in leadership behaviours when moving from traditional offices to AFOs. Office workers (n = 261) from five office sites within a large Swedish government agency were included in a controlled study of a natural intervention. At four sites, traditional offices were replaced by AFOs, while workers at one site with no relocation acted as the control. The same employees rated different leadership behaviours in a web-based questionnaire at baseline and at one follow-up. The analyses showed that relocations from cell and open-plan offices to AFOs were clearly related to a decrease in the perception of relation-oriented leadership behaviours. However, coming from open-plan offices to AFOs also decreased the perception of the other leadership dimensions. As expected, the control group was stable over time in their perceptions. This emphasises the need for organisations to provide managers with prerequisites so they can keep up with behaviours that support employees’ performance and health when office designs and ways of working are changed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
AFO; ABW; activity-based working; behaviour; flexible work; management; open-plan office
National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40326 (URN)10.3390/ijerph192013557 (DOI)000875366600001 ()36294137 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85140904476 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Transport Administration, 2015/43010
Available from: 2022-10-31 Created: 2022-10-31 Last updated: 2022-11-11Bibliographically approved
Bjärntoft, S., Hallman, D., Zetterberg, C., Larsson, J., Edvinsson, J. & Jahncke, H. (2021). A participatory approach to identify key areas for sustainable work environment and health in employees with flexible work arrangements. Sustainability, 13(24), Article ID 13593.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A participatory approach to identify key areas for sustainable work environment and health in employees with flexible work arrangements
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 24, article id 13593Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Flexible work arrangements are common worldwide, but knowledge on how to achieve a sustainable work environment is sparse. The aim of this study was to use a participatory approach to identify concrete suggestions and key areas for improvement that were considered relevant, effective, and feasible for promoting good work environment and health at organizational, work group and individual level (O-G-I), among office employees with flexible work arrangements. Eight focus group interviews (including 45 employees) were conducted in a large Swedish government agency in 2017. By using a Tree diagram approach, employees made a total of 279 suggestions for improvements, which were sorted into O-G-I levels and mapped into 18 key areas. We found that 13 key areas addressed organizational level (e.g., improving leadership, policy, job demands, and work efficiency), two key areas addressed group level (create common rules of availability and activity-based working), and three key areas addressed individual level (e.g., individuals’ responsibility to clearly communicate their availability). The participatory process was effective in obtaining concrete suggestions and key areas in need of improvement, which may provide an action plan that can guide organizations in developing interventions to promote good work environment and health in flexible work. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2021
Keywords
Health promotion; Job autonomy; Participative; Sustainable work; Work environment
National Category
Work Sciences
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work, Flexibelt arbete
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-37535 (URN)10.3390/su132413593 (DOI)000738547500001 ()2-s2.0-85120936209 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761Swedish Transport Administration, 2016/425/1
Available from: 2021-12-20 Created: 2021-12-20 Last updated: 2023-12-06Bibliographically approved
Bergsten, E. L., Haapakangas, A., Larsson, J., Jahncke, H. & Hallman, D. (2021). Effects of relocation to activity-based workplaces on perceived productivity: importance of change-oriented leadership. Applied Ergonomics, 93, 10-16, Article ID 103348.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of relocation to activity-based workplaces on perceived productivity: importance of change-oriented leadership
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 93, p. 10-16, article id 103348Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Activity-based workplaces (ABWs) are becoming popular in Western countries and were implemented at four office sites of a large Swedish government agency. A fifth office was used as a control group. The study aim was to examine the effects of relocation to ABW on perceived productivity among employees and to determine if perceived change-oriented leadership behavior prior to relocation moderates potential effects. Data were collected three months prior to relocation, and three and 12 months after. 407 respondents were included in linear mixed regression models. Perceived productivity decreased significantly after relocation compared to the control group and these effects persisted 12 months after the relocation. However, the decrease in perceived productivity was significantly smaller among employees perceiving high change-oriented leadership before relocation. Our results point out the importance of a change-oriented leadership behavior during the implementation to avoid productivity loss among employees when implementing ABWs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Flexible office; Implementation process; Organisational change
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30121 (URN)10.1016/j.apergo.2020.103348 (DOI)000633160900007 ()33497955 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85099804827 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Transport Administration, 2015/118
Available from: 2019-06-20 Created: 2019-06-20 Last updated: 2021-08-16Bibliographically approved
Jahncke, H. & Hallman, D. (2020). Objective measures of cognitive performance in activity based workplaces and traditional office types. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 72, Article ID 101503.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Objective measures of cognitive performance in activity based workplaces and traditional office types
2020 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 72, article id 101503Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Distraction from the background environment while performing concentrationdemanding tasks is a common issue for office employees in shared work areas. However, few field studies have been conducted on the effects of different office types and work areas on objective measurements of cognitive performance. The first aim of the present field study was to investigate, before relocation to an activity-based workplace (ABW), differences in performance on a concentration-demanding cognitive task between individuals in shared/open-plan offices compared to cell offices. The second aim was to investigate, after relocation, how performance differs (withinperson) between different work areas within the ABW. This study included employees from five offices (n = 113), of which four relocated into an ABW. An acoustician measured the equivalent sound levels of the work areas. Data were analyzed using linear regression (aim 1) and mixed models (aim 2). Before relocation, employees working in shared/open-plan offices performed significantly worse (14%) than those in cell-offices, which had a 15 LAeq lower noise level. After relocation, employees performed significantly worse in the active zone without noise restrictions, compared to all other work areas. When shifting open-plan area from the active zone to the quiet zone cognitive performance increased significantly by 16.9%, and switching to individual working rooms increased performance by 21.9%. The results clearly demonstrate the importance for organizations to provide quiet areas or rooms with few distractions for employees working on tasks that demand concentration in an ABW. A daily drop in performance for each employee may be expensive for the organization in the long run.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
cognitive task; memory; noise; cell office; flex office; open-plan office
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-32013 (URN)10.1016/j.jenvp.2020.101503 (DOI)000600919400007 ()2-s2.0-85092503300 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-01761Swedish Transport Administration, 2015/43010
Available from: 2020-03-08 Created: 2020-03-08 Last updated: 2021-06-02Bibliographically approved
Bjärntoft, S., Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E., Larsson, J. & Jahncke, H. (2020). Occupational and individual determinants of work-life balance among office workers with flexible work arrangements. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(4), Article ID 1418.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupational and individual determinants of work-life balance among office workers with flexible work arrangements
Show others...
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 4, article id 1418Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Flexible work arrangements permitting workers to work anytime and anywhere are increasingly common. This flexibility can introduce both challenges and opportunities for the organisation, as well as for worker work-life balance (WLB). This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the extent to which occupational factors (organizational, leadership and psychosocial) and individual work-related behaviours (over-commitment, overtime work and boundary management) are associated with WLB, and whether these associations are modified by the perceived level of flexibility at work (i.e., control over when, where, and how to do the work). In total, 2960 full-time office workers with flexible work arrangements at the Swedish Transport Administration participated. Associations were determined using linear regression analyses with adjustment for covariates. The strongest negative associations with WLB were found for over-commitment, quantitative job demands, expectations of availability, and overtime work. Strongest positive associations were found for boundary management, information about organizing work, social support, and relation-oriented leadership. Perceived flexibility was positively associated with WLB, and interacted with several of the examined factors, buffering their negative associations with WLB. Results suggest that WLB can be promoted by organizational initiatives focusing on minimizing excessive job demands, increasing psychosocial resources, supporting boundary management, and enhancing perceived flexibility.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2020
Keywords
work-life balance; autonomy; job resources; job demands; work control
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work; Health-Promoting Work, Flexibelt arbete
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30408 (URN)10.3390/ijerph17041418 (DOI)000522388500294 ()32098327 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85079902220 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761Swedish Transport Administration, 2015/92392
Available from: 2019-07-05 Created: 2019-07-05 Last updated: 2023-12-06Bibliographically approved
Mixter, S., Mathiassen, S. E., Lindfors, P., Dimberg, K., Jahncke, H., Lyskov, E. & Hallman, D. (2020). Stress-related responses to alternations between repetitive physical work and cognitive tasks of different difficulties. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(22), Article ID 8509.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stress-related responses to alternations between repetitive physical work and cognitive tasks of different difficulties
Show others...
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 22, article id 8509Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Alternating between physical and cognitive tasks has been proposed as an alternative in job rotation, allowing workers to recover from the physical work while still being productive. However, effects of such alternations on stress have not been investigated. This controlled experiment aimed at determining the extent to which stress-related responses develop during alternating physical and cognitive work, and to determine the extent to which cognitive task (CT) difficulty influences these responses. Fifteen women performed three sessions of 10 consecutive work bouts each including a seven-minute repetitive physical task (pipetting) and a three-minute CT (n-back) at one of three difficulty levels. Stress was assessed in terms of changes in heart rate variability, blood pressure, salivary alpha-amylase, salivary cortisol, perceived stress, and cognitive performance. The work session did not result in any marked stress response, and CT difficulty did not significantly influence stress, apart from alpha-amylase being higher at the easiest CT (F = 5.34, p = 0.02). Thus, according to our results, alternating between repetitive physical tasks and cognitive tasks may be a feasible alternative to classic job rotation between physical tasks only, even if the cognitive task is quite difficult. Future studies should address possible effects of the temporal pattern of alternations, and combine even other occupationally relevant tasks, preferably for extended periods of time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2020
Keywords
recovery, mental task, physical task, women, repetitive work, job rotation
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30459 (URN)10.3390/ijerph17228509 (DOI)000594130400001 ()33212862 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85096109337 (Scopus ID)
Funder
AFA Insurance, 120223
Available from: 2019-08-06 Created: 2019-08-06 Last updated: 2022-12-13Bibliographically approved
Rolfö, L., Jahncke, H., Järvholm, L. S., Öhrn, M. & Babapour, M. (2019). Predictors of Preference for the Activity-based Flexible Office. In: Tareq Ahram, Waldemar Karwowski, and Redha Taiar (Ed.), Human Systems Engineering and Design: Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Human Systems Engineering and Design (IHSED2018). Paper presented at 1st International Conference on Human Systems Engineering and Design (IHSED2018): Future Trends and Applications, October 25-27, 2018, Reims Champagne-Ardenne, France (pp. 546-552). Cham: Springer, 876
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictors of Preference for the Activity-based Flexible Office
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Human Systems Engineering and Design: Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Human Systems Engineering and Design (IHSED2018) / [ed] Tareq Ahram, Waldemar Karwowski, and Redha Taiar, Cham: Springer, 2019, Vol. 876, p. 546-552Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Activity-based Flexible Offices (A-FOs) are implemented with varying degree of success. Employees relocate from cell or open-plan offices, from different organizational backgrounds, varying design and implementation processes, and have different types of work tasks. This study aims at investigating whether preference for the A-FO correlate with these preconditions. The results from Chi-square tests and Spearman’s non-parametric correlation of post-relocation questionnaires distributed to 11 A-FO sites, showed that a high preference for the A-FO correlated strongest with an A-FO preference prior to relocation, being a former open-plan office occupier and with frequent performance of innovation. Low preference for the A-FO correlated with frequent performance of concentration demanding tasks. Working with tasks with high confidentiality did not predict the preference ratings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2019
Series
Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, ISSN 2194-5357, E-ISSN 2194-5365 ; 876
Keywords
ABW, Planning process, Work activities, Office buildings, Statistical tests, Surveys, Activity-based, Chi-square tests, Design and implementations, Non-parametric, Open-plan offices, Work task, Systems engineering
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-28687 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-02053-8_83 (DOI)000589188300083 ()2-s2.0-85055812345 (Scopus ID)978-3-030-02052-1 (ISBN)978-3-030-02053-8 (ISBN)
Conference
1st International Conference on Human Systems Engineering and Design (IHSED2018): Future Trends and Applications, October 25-27, 2018, Reims Champagne-Ardenne, France
Available from: 2018-11-27 Created: 2018-11-27 Last updated: 2020-12-17Bibliographically approved
Haapakangas, A., Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E. & Jahncke, H. (2019). The effects of moving into an activity-based office on communication, social relations and work demands – A controlled intervention with repeated follow-up. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 66, Article ID 101341.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of moving into an activity-based office on communication, social relations and work demands – A controlled intervention with repeated follow-up
2019 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 66, article id 101341Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

When organizations adopt activity-based workplaces (ABWs), improved interaction is a common goal. Yet, few controlled longitudinal studies have been conducted on the effects of ABWs on interaction, social relations and work demands. The aim of this natural intervention study was to investigate the effects of moving into an ABW on satisfaction with communication, on social relations (i.e., social support and social community) and on work demands (i.e., quantitative demands, emotional demands and work pace) 3 months and 12 months after the relocation. The study included four offices which relocated into an ABW and one control office that did not. Questionnaire data from 408 respondents were analyzed with linear mixed models. Satisfaction with communication and the sense of belonging to a community had decreased 3 and 12 months after the relocation. Work pace was not affected while small, mostly short-term, negative effects on social support, quantitative demands and emotional demands were only observed among employees who had moved to ABWs from private offices. Differences between office sites were also observed. The results suggest that, to avoid negative outcomes, organizations moving to ABWs should focus on solving difficulties in locating colleagues at the office and on supporting particularly workers from private offices in adopting activity-based working.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Flexible office, Collaboration, Stress, Office design, New ways of working, COPSOQ
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29117 (URN)10.1016/j.jenvp.2019.101341 (DOI)000503091000010 ()2-s2.0-85071843921 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-01761Swedish Transport Administration, 2015/43010
Note

Additional finance: Arbetarskyddsfonden nr. 117523

Available from: 2019-01-15 Created: 2019-01-15 Last updated: 2021-04-01Bibliographically approved
Projects
Buller i kontorslandskap - Experiment och interventionsstudier med normalhörande och hörselnedsatta personer [070112]; University of Gävle; Publications
Jahncke, H. & Halin, N. (2012). Performance, fatigue and stress in open-plan offices: the effects of noise and restoration on hearing impaired and normal hearing individuals. Noise & Health, 14(60), 260-272Jahncke, H., Hygge, S., Halin, N., Green, A. M. & Dimberg, K. (2011). Open-plan office noise: Cognitive performance and restoration. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 31(4), 373-382Jahncke, H. (2011). Restoration at work: Effects of different sound exposures. In: Proceedings of the Institute of Acoustics: . Paper presented at 10th International Congress on Noise as a Public Health Problem 2011 (ICBEN 2011), 24-28 July 2011, London , United Kingdom (pp. 532-539). London: Institute of Acoustics, 33Jahncke, H. (2011). The effects of sounds on restorative processes. In: Proceedings at the 9th Biennial conference on Environmental Psychology, September 26-28: . Paper presented at 9th Biennial conference on Environmental Psychology, Eindhoven, the Netherlands, September 26-28 2011. Jahncke, H., Hygge, S., Halin, N., Green, A. M. & Dimberg, K. (2010). An experiment on noise and cognition in a simulated open-plan office. In: 39th International Congress on Noise Control Engineering 2010, INTER-NOISE 2010: . Paper presented at INTER-NOISE 2010, the 39th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering, 13-16 June, 2010, Lisbon, Portugal (pp. 2827-2836). Lisbon, Portugal: Portuguese acoustical society, 4Jahncke, H. & Hygge, S. (2010). Buller i öppna kontorslandskap. Audionytt, 3, 16-18Jahncke, H. (2010). Work and restoration in open-plan offices during different sound exposures. In: V. Mrowinski, M. Kyrios & N. Voudouris (Ed.), Proceedings at the 27th International Congress of Applied Psychology (ICAP), 13-16 June (CD): . Paper presented at ICAP (pp. 567-568). Melbourne, Australia: The Australian Psychological Society Ltd
The Burden of Noise - Rethinking criteria for acceptable acoustical conditions in the classroom [2010-1006_Formas]; University of Gävle; Publications
Hurtig, A., Sörqvist, P., Ljung, R., Hygge, S. & Rönnberg, J. (2016). Student's second-language grade may depend on classroom listening position. PLOS ONE, 11(6), Article ID e0156533. Hygge, S., Kjellberg, A. & Nöstl, A. (2015). Speech intelligibility and recall of first and second language words heard at different signal-to-noise ratios. Frontiers in Psychology, 6, Article ID 1390. Hurtig, A., Hygge, S., Kjellberg, A., Nöstl, A., Keus van de Poll, M., Ljung, R. & Sörqvist, P. (2014). Acoustical conditions in the classroom: Recall of spoken words in English and Swedish heard at different signal-to-noise ratios. In: 11th International Congress on Noise as a Public Health Problem (ICBEN), Nara, Japan, 1-5 June, 2014: . Paper presented at 11th International Congress on Noise as a Public Health Problem (ICBEN), Nara, Japan, 1-5 June, 2014. Hygge, S., Kjellberg, A., Nöstl, A., Keus, M., Hurtig, A., Ljung, R. & Sörqvist, P. (2013). Acoustical conditions in the classroom II: Recall of spoken words in English and Swedish heard at different signal-to-noise ratios. In: 42nd International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering 2013, INTER-NOISE 2013: Noise Control for Quality of Life: . Paper presented at InterNoise 2013, Innsbruck, Sept 15-18, 2013 (invited speaker) (pp. 5091-5098). Hygge, S., Kjellberg, A., Sörqvist, P., Ljung, R. & Jahncke, H. (2012). Dålig akustik i klassrum ger sämre inlärning. Vi hörs, 2, 11-13
Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor [TRV 2015/43010]; University of Gävle; Publications
Jahncke, H. & Hallman, D. (2020). Objective measures of cognitive performance in activity based workplaces and traditional office types. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 72, Article ID 101503. Haapakangas, A., Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E. & Jahncke, H. (2019). The effects of moving into an activity-based office on communication, social relations and work demands – A controlled intervention with repeated follow-up. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 66, Article ID 101341. Haapakangas, A., Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E. & Jahncke, H. (2018). Self-rated productivity and employee well-being in activity-based offices: the role of environmental perceptions and workspace use. Building and Environment, 145, 115-124Jahncke, H., Persson, L. & Hallman, D. (2017). Aktivitetsbaserade arbetsplatser: Koncentration, stillasittande och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor: Kartläggning år 2015-2017. Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor A: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor B: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor C: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor D: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i GävleJahncke, H., Edvinsson, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Hallman, D. (2016). Delrapport kontor E: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor. Gävle: Högskolan i Gävle
Hälsofrämjande återhämtningsmönster i schemalagda arbeten [TRV 2016/47640]; University of Gävle
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6668-5044

Search in DiVA

Show all publications