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Svensson, S., Mathiassen, S. E., Hallman, D., Heiden, M. & Bergström, G. (2023). Associations between telework experience and psychosocial working conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic: A cross-sectional analysis among white-collar workers in Sweden. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 65(2), e74-e82
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between telework experience and psychosocial working conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic: A cross-sectional analysis among white-collar workers in Sweden
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 65, no 2, p. e74-e82Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To determine to what extent pre-COVID-19 experience of telework was associated with perceived psychosocial working conditions (PWC; job demands, social support and influence at work) during the COVID-19 pandemic among white-collar workers in Sweden, and to determine to what extent the association depends on demographic factors, organizational tenure, and amount of computer use.

Methods: Cross-sectional questionnaire data from 603 white-collar workers were collected October-December 2020 in an industrial company.

Results: In general, telework experience was not significantly associated with PWC. Women who began teleworking due to COVID-19 reported more job demands than women not teleworking. For those who began teleworking due to COVID-19, managerial support increased with age.

Conclusion: In general, telework experience was not associated with PWC, but telework due to COVID-19 may have influenced PWC differently depending on gender and age.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WoltersKluwer, 2023
Keywords
Telework; COVID-19; Job demands; Influence at work; Social support
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work, Flexibelt arbete
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-39433 (URN)10.1097/JOM.0000000000002758 (DOI)000925880100008 ()36729912 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85147457310 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-01257
Available from: 2022-07-04 Created: 2022-07-04 Last updated: 2024-04-26Bibliographically approved
Mathiassen, S. E., Waleh Åström, A., Strömberg, A. & Heiden, M. (2023). Cost and statistical efficiency of posture assessment by inclinometry and observation, exemplified by paper mill work. PLOS ONE, 18(10), Article ID e0292261.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cost and statistical efficiency of posture assessment by inclinometry and observation, exemplified by paper mill work
2023 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 10, article id e0292261Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Postures at work are paramount in ergonomics. They can be determined using observation and inclinometry in a variety of measurement scenarios that may differ both in costs associated with collecting and processing data, and in efficiency, i.e. the precision of the eventual outcome. The trade-off between cost and efficiency has rarely been addressed in research despite the obvious interest of obtaining precise data at low costs. Median trunk and upper arm inclination were determined for full shifts in 28 paper mill workers using both observation and inclinometry. Costs were estimated using comprehensive cost equations; and efficiency, i.e. the inverted standard deviation of the group mean, was assessed on basis of exposure variance components. Cost and efficiency were estimated in simulations of six sampling scenarios: two for inclinometry (sampling from one or three shifts) and four for observation (one or three observers rating one or three shifts). Each of the six scenarios was evaluated for 1 through 50 workers. Cost-efficiency relationships between the scenarios were intricate. As an example, inclinometry was always more cost-efficient than observation for trunk inclination, except for observation strategies involving only few workers; while for arm inclination, observation by three observers of one shift per worker outperformed inclinometry on three shifts up to a budget of €20000, after which inclinometry prevailed. At a budget of €10000, the best sampling scenario for arm inclination was 2.5 times more efficient than the worst. Arm inclination could be determined with better cost-efficiency than trunk inclination. Our study illustrates that the cost-efficiency of different posture measurement strategies can be assessed and compared using easily accessible diagrams. While the numeric examples in our study are specific to the investigated occupation, exposure variables, and sampling logistics, we believe that inclinometry will, in general, outperform observation. In any specific case, we recommend a thorough analysis, using the comparison procedure proposed in the present study, of feasible strategies for obtaining data, in order to arrive at an informed decision support.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PLOS, 2023
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40999 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0292261 (DOI)001082402300022 ()37788296 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85173062236 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Available from: 2023-02-02 Created: 2023-02-02 Last updated: 2023-11-16Bibliographically approved
Wahlström, V., Januario, L., Mathiassen, S. E., Heiden, M. & Hallman, D. (2023). Hybrid office work in women and men: do directly measured physical behaviors differ between days working from home and days working at the office?. Annals of Work Exposures and Health, 67(9), 1043-1055
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hybrid office work in women and men: do directly measured physical behaviors differ between days working from home and days working at the office?
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2023 (English)In: Annals of Work Exposures and Health, ISSN 2398-7308 , E-ISSN 2398-7316 , Vol. 67, no 9, p. 1043-1055Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ObjectiveWe investigated and compared temporal sitting patterns among male and female hybrid office workers when working at the office (WAO), working from home (WFH), and for non-working days (NWD).

MethodsWe analyzed data collected in 2020 among 165 hybrid office workers, carrying thigh-worn accelerometers for 938 days in total. Day type (WAO, WFH, or NWD) and time in bed were identified using diaries. Time awake was exhaustively classified as non-sitting time and time sitting in short, moderate, and long bouts. Effects of day type and gender on the 24-h compositions of physical behaviors were analyzed using multilevel linear mixed models.

ResultsDuring workdays (both WAO and WFH), workers spent less time in bed and more time sitting, particularly in moderate and long bouts, than during NWD. Time in bed was longer when working from home than when working at the office, and more of the awake time was spent sitting. Differences between WAO and WFH in ratios between short, moderate, and long bouts of sitting were small and inconsistent. Men spent more time sitting than women, and more time in moderate and long sitting bouts relative to short bouts.

ConclusionsWhen working from home, hybrid office workers sat more during their hours awake compared to when working at the office. Sitting time was larger during working days than during non-working days and was higher in men than in women. These results may contribute to support organizational policies for hybrid work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford Academic, 2023
Keywords
covid-19 pandemic, compositional data analysis, remote work, sedentary, temporal patterns, time in bed
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work, Flexibelt arbete
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40561 (URN)10.1093/annweh/wxad057 (DOI)001078696200001 ()37795673 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85178498189 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-12-05 Created: 2022-12-05 Last updated: 2024-04-26Bibliographically approved
Korkeakunnas, T., Heiden, M., Lohela Karlsson, M. & Rambaree, K. (2023). Managers’ Perceptions of Telework in Relation to Work Environment and Performance. Sustainability, 15(7), Article ID 5845.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managers’ Perceptions of Telework in Relation to Work Environment and Performance
2023 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 15, no 7, article id 5845Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study aimed to investigate managers’ perceptions of telework in relation to the work environment and the performance of their organizations. It was grounded on interviews with 17 managers from public and private organizations in Sweden using a phenomenographic research approach. The managers had experience in leading employees who teleworked, and their contact information was provided by the organizations. The results showed that managers perceived that telework led to more focus on delivery at work. When telework enabled working undisturbed and getting more work done, employees started to question the need to come to the workplace. Further, some employees changed their behaviors at the workplace; they tended to close their office doors to avoid distractions. Others valued social activities when working at the workplace. Managers also reported that telework could make small close-working teams even closer, but they could lose contact with others outside the teams. In addition, telework led to quicker but less informed decisions, which may benefit productivity in the short term but not in the long term. The findings of the study highlight managers’ perspectives on the consequences of telework in an organization, which is important for maintaining organizational sustainability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
telecommuting, manager, wellbeing, effectivity, deliver, work routines, social community, added value, attractivity
National Category
Business Administration Work Sciences
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work, Flexibelt arbete
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-41247 (URN)10.3390/su15075845 (DOI)000970352100001 ()2-s2.0-85152647768 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-01257
Available from: 2023-03-29 Created: 2023-03-29 Last updated: 2024-04-26Bibliographically approved
Heiden, M., Hallman, D., Svensson, M., Mathiassen, S. E., Svensson, S. & Bergström, G. (2023). Mismatch between actual and preferred extent of telework: cross-sectional and prospective associations with well-being and burnout. BMC Public Health, 23, Article ID 1736.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mismatch between actual and preferred extent of telework: cross-sectional and prospective associations with well-being and burnout
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2023 (English)In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 23, article id 1736Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: This study aimed to determine whether telework mismatch, i.e., lack of fit between actual and preferred extent of telework, is cross-sectionally and prospectively associated with well-being and burnout.

Methods: A questionnaire was sent to employees in a Swedish manufacturing company in November 2020 (baseline) and September 2021 (follow-up). It contained questions about well-being (WHO-5 Well-Being Index) and burnout (Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire III), as well as the preferred extent of telework and extent of telework performed. Telework mismatch was calculated as the difference between the actual and preferred extent of telework. Change in mismatch over time was categorized as 1) less mismatch at follow-up than at baseline, 2) more mismatch at follow-up, and 3) identical levels of mismatch at baseline and follow-up. Multivariate and univariate analyses of variance were used to determine the effects of mismatch and change in mismatch over time on baseline ratings and changes in ratings of well-being and burnout. All analyses were performed with and without adjustment for age, sex, marital status, children, type of employment, commuting time and extent of telework performed.

Results: The response rate was 39% at baseline (n=928, 67% men, mean(SD) age: 45(11) years) and 60% at follow-up (n=556, 64% men, mean(SD) age: 46(11) years). A cross-sectional association was found between telework mismatch and well-being, showing that employees who teleworked more than they would like reported worse well-being than those who teleworked less than they would like. No statistically significant association was found between telework mismatch and burnout. The ability of telework mismatch at baseline to predict changes in well-being or burnout over 10 months was small and non-significant. No association was found between change in telework mismatch over the 10-month period and corresponding changes in well-being or burnout.

Conclusion: Our results suggest that telework should be thoughtfully practiced in companies/organizations to avoid negative consequences for employees who already telework more than they prefer. Studies are needed to determine how long-term changes in match between preferred and actual extent of telework is associated with employee well-being, including how the association is modified by the nature of the job and the work environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
telecommuting, flexible work, person-environment fit, match, Sweden
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work, Flexibelt arbete
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40591 (URN)10.1186/s12889-023-16683-8 (DOI)001064421700007 ()37674141 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85169998556 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-01257AFA Insurance, 200244
Available from: 2022-12-08 Created: 2022-12-08 Last updated: 2023-10-05Bibliographically approved
Brusaca, L. A., Januario, L., Mathiassen, S. E., Barbieri, D., Oliveira, R., Heiden, M., . . . Hallman, D. (2022). 24-hour compositions of physical (in)activity among office workers during the COVID-19 pandemic: a comparison between Brazil and Sweden. In: Proceedings of the ICAMPAM2022 conference: . Paper presented at ICAMPAM2022.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>24-hour compositions of physical (in)activity among office workers during the COVID-19 pandemic: a comparison between Brazil and Sweden
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2022 (English)In: Proceedings of the ICAMPAM2022 conference, 2022Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background: Sedentary behavior (SED) has generally increased during the COVID-19 pandemic in people working from home, and physical activity (PA) has therefore decreased. However, it is unclear whether the pandemic has affected office workers in different countries in the same way. We aimed to compare the 24-hour time-use compositions of physical behaviors between Brazilian and Swedish office workers at working and non-working days during the pandemic. Methods: Physical behaviors were monitored over 7 days using thigh-worn accelerometer in 73 Brazilian and 202 Swedish workers. Daily time-use compositions were exhaustively described in terms of SED in short (<30 min) and long (≥30 min) bouts, light PA (LPA), moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), and time-in-bed (TIB). Following a compositional data analysis, isometric log-ratios (ilr) were calculated to express the ratio of TIB to time spent awake, SED (short and long bouts) relative to LPA and MVPA, SED in short relative to long bouts, and LPA relative to MVPA. We examined differences between countries using MANOVA, followed by univariate post-hoc tests of pairwise differences. Results: Both groups spent most of their time SED and in bed. On working days, Brazilian workers spent 294 min in SED in short bouts, 477 min in SED in long bouts, 157 min in LPA, 50 min in MVPA and 461 min TIB; Swedes spent 274, 365, 257, 86 and 458 min, respectively. During non-working days, results were 279, 359, 237, 61 and 504 min among Brazilians and 263, 251, 305, 93 and 529 min among Swedes.  Brazilians and Swedes differed significantly in the set of ilrs as a whole during working (p < 0.001) and non-working days (p < 0.001) and in all pairwise comparisons, except for the ratio of TIB to time spent awake during non-working days. Conclusions: During the COVID-19 pandemic Brazilian and Swedish office workers behaved differently. Whether this relates to restrictions being different or to differences even before the pandemic is not clear.

National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-39738 (URN)
Conference
ICAMPAM2022
Available from: 2022-08-18 Created: 2022-08-18 Last updated: 2022-08-22Bibliographically approved
Mutiganda, J. C., Wiitavaara, B., Heiden, M., Svensson, S., Fagerström, A., Bergström, G. & Aboagye, E. (2022). A systematic review of the research on telework and organizational economic performance indicators. Frontiers in Psychology, 13, Article ID 1035310.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A systematic review of the research on telework and organizational economic performance indicators
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2022 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 13, article id 1035310Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: A systematic review is conducted in the study to investigate the relationship between telework and organizational economic performance indicators such as self-reported employee performance, organizational performance, actual employee turnover rates, or intentions.

Methods: The databases Scopus, Business Source Premier, and Web of Science were used to conduct a literature search. Original articles published from 2000 and up to May 2021 were selected. Studies were screened for inclusion independently by review pairs and data were extracted. The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT) was used to evaluate the quality of the studies included.

Results: Forty-three studies were included with some addressing multiple outcomes. Self-reported performance was higher for teleworking employees compared to those working in the ordinary workplace. The extent of the change in performance was dependent on individual characteristics and the extent of the teleworking practice in the organization. Telework was also associated with increased organizational performance, particularly in homogenous samples with unique work tasks. When telework is voluntary, it appears that both actual employee turnover rates and intentions to leave the organization are lower.

Discussion: Further research with high-quality prospective designs is necessary to properly understand the contribution of telework to organizational economic performance indicators.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers, 2022
Keywords
telework, employee turnover, systematic review, organizational economic performance, employee perceived performance
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work, Flexibelt arbete
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40580 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2022.1035310 (DOI)000907117300001 ()36619046 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85145503539 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-01257
Available from: 2022-12-07 Created: 2022-12-07 Last updated: 2023-04-14Bibliographically approved
Svensson, S., Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E., Heiden, M., Fagerström, A., Mutiganda, J. C. & Bergström, G. (2022). Flexible work: Opportunity and Challenge (FLOC) for individual, social and economic sustainability. Protocol for a prospective cohort study of non-standard employment and flexible work arrangements in Sweden. BMJ Open, 12(7), Article ID e057409.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Flexible work: Opportunity and Challenge (FLOC) for individual, social and economic sustainability. Protocol for a prospective cohort study of non-standard employment and flexible work arrangements in Sweden
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2022 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 12, no 7, article id e057409Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction

Flexibility in working life, including non-standard employment (NSE) and flexible work arrangements (FWAs), offers the organisation a better ability to adapt to changing conditions while also posing considerable challenges for organisations as well as workers. The aim of the Flexible Work: Opportunity and Challenge (FLOC) study is to investigate associations between NSE and FWA on the one hand, and individual, social and economic sustainability on the other.

Methods and analysis This prospective open cohort study targets approximately 8000 workers 18–65 years old in 8–10 public and private organisations in Sweden. We will use a comprehensive battery of measurement methods addressing financial performance, physical and psychosocial exposures, and physical and mental health, both at the organisational and the individual level. Methods include valid survey questionnaires and register data, and, in subpopulations, technical measurements, interviews and diaries. Main exposures are type of employment and type of work arrangement. Main outcomes are indicators of social and economic sustainability and, at the individual level, health and well-being. Data, collected over 54 months at approximately 18-month intervals, will be analysed using multivariate methods considering main effects as well as potential effect modifiers. The analyses will take into account that respondents are nested in organisations, divisions and/or have specific managers.

Ethics and dissemination: FLOC is approved by the Swedish Ethical Review Authority (decision numbers 2019–06220, 2020–06094 and 2021–02725). Data will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at international conferences, and researchers will assist the organisations in improving policies and routines for employment and organisation of work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ, 2022
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work, Flexibelt arbete; Intelligent Industry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-39435 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2021-057409 (DOI)000823695600022 ()35820754 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85133909570 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-01257
Available from: 2022-07-04 Created: 2022-07-04 Last updated: 2024-04-26Bibliographically approved
Widar, L., Heiden, M., Boman, E. & Wiitavaara, B. (2022). How is telework experienced in academia?. Sustainability, 14(10), Article ID 5745.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How is telework experienced in academia?
2022 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 10, article id 5745Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An increasing number of academic institutions offer their staff the option to work from other places than the conventional office, i.e., telework. Academic teaching and research staff are recognized as some of the most frequent teleworkers, and this seems to affect their well-being, work performance, and recovery in different ways. This study aimed to investigate academics’ experiences and perceptions of telework within the academic context. For this, we interviewed 26 academics from different Swedish universities. Interviews were analyzed with a phenomenographic approach, which showed that telework was perceived as a natural part of academic work and a necessary resource for coping with, and recovering from, high work demands. Telework was mostly self-regulated but the opportunity could be determined by work tasks, professional culture, and management. Telework could facilitate the individual’s work but could contribute to challenges for the workgroup. Formal regulations of telework were considered a threat to academics’ work autonomy and to their possibility to cope with the high work demands. The findings provide insight into academics’ working conditions during teleworking, which may be important for maintaining a sustainable work environment when academic institutions offer telework options.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
telework; academics; autonomy; working conditions; well-being; experiences; interviews; occupational health
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work, Flexibelt arbete
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-38140 (URN)10.3390/su14105745 (DOI)000801722700001 ()2-s2.0-85130374172 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-03-11 Created: 2022-03-11 Last updated: 2023-05-02Bibliographically approved
Hemphälä, H., Heiden, M., Zetterberg, C., Lindberg, P., Lindén, J. & Nylén, P. (2022). Objective risk assessment of glare and subjective rating of the frequency of glare ‐ a visual ergonomics risk assessment, VERAM. In: : . Paper presented at 51st NES conference, October 23-25 Uppsala, Sweden 2022.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Objective risk assessment of glare and subjective rating of the frequency of glare ‐ a visual ergonomics risk assessment, VERAM
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2022 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Insufficient lighting conditions and glare from luminaires in the visual environment can affect our visual ability and cause eyestrain, headache, and musculoskeletal strain. Knave et al. found that the frequency of reported glare was associated with more eyestrain. In this study a subjectively rated frequency of glare was compared to an objectively rated risk for glare made by trained assessors.

A visual ergonomics risk assessment method (VERAM) was used to gather data at workplaces, mainly computer workstations (n=420). Trained assessors (ergonomists) measured the luminance ratio and assessed the risk for glare (objective risk for glare) divided into three categories high risk (red), low risk (yellow) and no risk (green).Workers rated the frequency of experienced glare at their workplaces (subjective assessment of glare) via questionnaires. The frequency of subjective strain was divided into three categories; no, never; occasionally; a few times a week/almost always.

Workers rated the frequency of glare present more seldom than the trained assessors rated the presence for risk for glare, at the same workplaces. One factor behind this might be individuals’ ability to evaluate the visual environment such as risk for glare. A trained assessor can easier evaluate any risks in the visual environment.

When the objective risk for glare was assessed to be high (red) or low (yellow) the percentage of individuals reporting strain, such as eyestrain and musculoskeletal strain, increased for most symptoms compared to when there was no risk (green). An objective risk assessment for glare needs to be performed together with a subjective rating of the frequency of glare to find the individuals with problems.

Keywords
discomfort glare, asthenopia, neck pain
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40458 (URN)
Conference
51st NES conference, October 23-25 Uppsala, Sweden 2022
Available from: 2022-11-18 Created: 2022-11-18 Last updated: 2022-11-28Bibliographically approved
Projects
Cost-efficient modeling of physical work load - an empirical study of work postures in industry [2010-00748_Forte]; University of Gävle; Publications
Trask, C., Mathiassen, S. E., Rostami, M. & Heiden, M. (2017). Observer variability in posture assessment from video recordings: the effect of partly visible periods. Applied Ergonomics, 60, 275-281Heiden, M., Garza, J., Trask, C. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2017). Predicting directly measured trunk and upper arm postures in paper mill work from administrative data, workers’ ratings and posture observations. Annals of Work Exposures and Health, 61(2), 207-217Heiden, M., Garza, J., Trask, C. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2016). Cost-efficient assessment of variation in arm posture during paper mill work. In: : . Paper presented at Ninth International Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders (PREMUS), June 20-23, 2016, Toronto, Canada. Garza, J., Mathiassen, S. E. & Heiden, M. (2016). Reliability of using observations when assessing different posture variables. In: : . Paper presented at Ninth International Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders (PREMUS), Toronto, June 20-23, 2016. Trask, C., Mathiassen, S. E., Rostami, M. & Heiden, M. (2016). Variance components of observed postural exposure - the effect of partly visible periods. In: : . Paper presented at Ninth International Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders (PREMUS), June 20-23, 2016, Toronto, Canada. Heiden, M. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2015). Prediction of trunk and upper arm postures in paper mill workers by statistical modelling: an empirical validation study. In: Gitte Lindgaard & Dave Moore (Ed.), Proceedings of the 19th Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association, Melbourne 9-14 August 2015: . Paper presented at 19th Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association, 9-14 August 2015, Melbourne, Australia.
(O)frivilligt distansarbete - hur påverkar det arbetshälsan? [200244]; University of Gävle; Publications
Heiden, M., Hallman, D., Svensson, M., Mathiassen, S. E., Svensson, S. & Bergström, G. (2023). Mismatch between actual and preferred extent of telework: cross-sectional and prospective associations with well-being and burnout. BMC Public Health, 23, Article ID 1736.
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5055-0698

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