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Sjöblom, Yvonne
Publications (10 of 43) Show all publications
Soyez, V., Gilligan, R., Arnau-Sabatès, L., Johansson, H., Hojer, I., Pazlorova, H., . . . Stoddart, J. (2024). Early work experiences, social inclusion and transition to adulthood: The voice of care-experienced young adults. Journal of Social Work
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early work experiences, social inclusion and transition to adulthood: The voice of care-experienced young adults
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1468-0173, E-ISSN 1741-296XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

It is widely recognised that young people in out-of-home care are often involved in a complex process of culminating disadvantage and exclusion. Investing in the core ingredients of social inclusion (participation and interpersonal relationships) while still in care can counterbalance ongoing exclusion processes. In this article, we explore how early work experiences (before the age of 18) can play a role in this. Findings: A thematic analysis was performed on interview data from 74 young adults in six countries. Several elements promote community participation (gaining financial autonomy, gaining a feeling of independence, and being able to contribute as a worker) and help to develop a sense of belonging (striving for normality and building long-lasting social connections). Early work experiences also contribute to personal growth (building capabilities and shaping the future). Applications: This article highlights how early work experiences have the potential to promote social inclusion for out-of-home care-experienced young people and serve as gateway experiences for both educational and work trajectories. Entry into the world of work should not be postponed until the age of 18. Caregivers can play a role in motivating young people to work while still being in care and helping them to find a job. The experiences gained during these early work experiences can also have a place in the care process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE, 2024
Keywords
qualitative research; skills teaching; social capital; social inclusion; social work; work
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-43753 (URN)10.1177/14680173231225423 (DOI)001146940100001 ()2-s2.0-85183054035 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-02-05 Created: 2024-02-05 Last updated: 2024-02-09Bibliographically approved
Johansson, H., Sjöblom, Y., Höjer, I., Gilligan, R., Arnau‐Sabatés, L., Pazlarová, H., . . . Stoddart, J. (2024). Exploring care leavers' agency in achieving entry into the world of work: A cross‐national study in six countries. International Journal of Social Welfare, 33(1), 309-319
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring care leavers' agency in achieving entry into the world of work: A cross‐national study in six countries
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2024 (English)In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 309-319Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article draws attention to the relevance of young care leavers' exercise of agency as one possible key ingredient in overcoming barriers to engagement in work. Several previous studies show difficulties in entering adult life, both in relation to higher and further education as well as entrance into work life. The article analyses interviews with young adults from six countries, who have spent at least part of their childhood and youth in out-of-home care and the results indicate that the care leavers have the ability to make plans and set up goals for the future that they in many cases are able to achieve or at least are striving for over time. In many instances, they show a strong motivation, for example, to educate themselves pursuing their goals. To support this transition of young care leavers, it is important to listen to ‘successful’ cases such as the ones presented.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2024
Keywords
agency; cross-national; employment; qualitative research; transition from care; youth
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-41721 (URN)10.1111/ijsw.12603 (DOI)000967666000001 ()2-s2.0-85152778687 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-05-01 Created: 2023-05-01 Last updated: 2023-12-11Bibliographically approved
Bengtsson, M., Sjöblom, Y. & Öberg, P. (2020). Transitional patterns when leaving care – Care leavers’ agency in a longitudinal perspective. Children and youth services review, 118, Article ID 105486.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transitional patterns when leaving care – Care leavers’ agency in a longitudinal perspective
2020 (English)In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 118, article id 105486Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Based on three waves of semi-structured interviews, this longitudinal qualitative study aims to understand the transition from out-of-home care (OHC; foster care, residential care) to independent adulthood, for a group of Swedish care leavers aged 16–20 years (n = 14). What are the main patterns in their transition process? How is agency reflected in these processes? The first interview (T1) was conducted when they were all still in OHC but on the verge of leaving, the second (T2) when the majority had left care and the third (T3) when they had been out for some time. Average time from T1 to T3 was 21 months, ranging from 17 to 28 months. By directed content analysis and an abductive approach, three transitional patterns were identified: From care to societal insiders, From care to societal outsiders and From care to societal in-betweeners. These patterns were connected to different dimensions of agency. Agency with long-term goals was shown to be connected to a stable transition from care, facilitating the emerging identification as independent “insiders” of society. Agency oriented towards the short term instead seemed to be connected to unstable transitions with a growing perception of being left as “outsiders” of society. Shuttling between those agentic positions, trying to apply long-term agency but experiencing the need for instant and pragmatic decisions, implied a halted transition “in-between” OHC and independent adulthood. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Agency, Leaving care, Longitudinal studies, Transition, Young people
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-34075 (URN)10.1016/j.childyouth.2020.105486 (DOI)000580051200117 ()2-s2.0-85091672294 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-10-08 Created: 2020-10-08 Last updated: 2023-12-01Bibliographically approved
Storø, J., Sjöblom, Y. & Höjer, I. (2019). A comparison of state support for young people leaving care in Norway and Sweden: Differences within comparable welfare systems. Child & Family Social Work, 24(3), 393-399
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparison of state support for young people leaving care in Norway and Sweden: Differences within comparable welfare systems
2019 (English)In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 393-399Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this article is to account for and discuss support to young care leavers within the comparable welfare regimes of Norway and Sweden and to explore key differences between these 2 countries. This model implies that children and young people are included and entitled to support through being family members, not as independent actors in their own right. This makes young care leaver’s transition from care to adulthood problematic—as they often do not have access to family support, they may be positioned in a vacuum where they are clients neither entitled to support from the child welfare system nor supported by their families of origin. In Norway, legislators and policymakers have agreed that care leavers need particular attention and targeted support, whereas in Sweden, there has been no such agreement. However, the Norwegian system of giving leaving care services is not strong enough to provide transition support to all care leavers, even if the legislation gives stronger protection than in Sweden. The article discusses the need for targeted measures of support for a successful care-leaving process. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2019
Keywords
adolescence; adult; adulthood; article; attention; child; child welfare; controlled study; human; law; Norway; social support; Sweden; vacuum
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30566 (URN)10.1111/cfs.12471 (DOI)000477909900010 ()2-s2.0-85069960958 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-23 Created: 2019-08-23 Last updated: 2021-05-19Bibliographically approved
Bengtsson, M., Sjöblom, Y. & Öberg, P. (2018). ‘Well, it’s up to me now’ – young care leavers’ strategies for handling adversities when leaving out-of-home care in Sweden. Nordic Social Work Research, 8(sup 1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘Well, it’s up to me now’ – young care leavers’ strategies for handling adversities when leaving out-of-home care in Sweden
2018 (English)In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 8, no sup 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AbstractThis qualitative longitudinal study of 20 young Swedish care leavers investigates their subjective experience of and strategies for handling adversities when being in the process of leaving out-of-home care. The empirical data is based on two sets of interviews, the first conducted at time 1 (T1) when they were still in care but the moving out process had begun, the second (T2) 6-10 months later when the vast majority had left care. The thematic analysis based on resilience theory showed that the majority of the informants over time developed process-oriented strategies, which in our categorization emanated either from the inner world of the informants (e.g. through re-framing of experiences and an emerging self-reliance) or from their outer contextual world (e.g. through a restructuring of the social network). The results are discussed from a resilience theoretical perspective in which the informants' strategies are illustrated by the conceptual pair of 'navigation' and 'negotiation', used to make sense of their inner and outer world-oriented strategies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
Leaving care; longitudinal studies; resilience; young people; handling adversities
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26112 (URN)10.1080/2156857X.2018.1428673 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-02-07 Created: 2018-02-07 Last updated: 2022-09-19Bibliographically approved
Bengtsson, M., Sjöblom, Y. & Öberg, P. (2018). Young care leavers’ expectations of their future: A question of time horizon. Child & Family Social Work, 23(2), 188-195
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Young care leavers’ expectations of their future: A question of time horizon
2018 (English)In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 188-195Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper investigates young care leavers’ expectations of their future after discharge from care. The results are based on qualitative longitudinal data where 16- to 21-year-old care leavers (n = 15) were interviewed twice, first when still in care but planning for their discharge (T1) and the second time 6–9 months later (T2). The analysis using a general inductive approach showed that their expectations were dependent on the time horizon and that there was an obvious difference between the young informants’ short- and long-term expectations. Their short-term expectations consisted of worries connected to their approaching discharge (at T1) and how to cope with challenges of everyday life after discharge from care (at T2). These results seem to echo negative outcomes shown in previous quantitative research. However, the informants’ long-term expectations provide a different picture, being mainly positive in both interviews (T1 and T2). The results are discussed from a life course perspective, where the informants’ visions of their future are framed and understood in terms of the different stages of their transition process.

Keywords
adolescence, foster care, leaving care, residential care, young people (well-being of in care)
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25356 (URN)10.1111/cfs.12399 (DOI)000430665900007 ()2-s2.0-85045758513 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-04 Created: 2017-10-04 Last updated: 2022-09-19Bibliographically approved
Söderqvist, Å., Sjöblom, Y. & Bülow, P. (2016). Home sweet home?: Professionals' understanding of ‘home’ within residential care for unaccompanied youths in Sweden. Child & Family Social Work, 21(4), 591-599
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Home sweet home?: Professionals' understanding of ‘home’ within residential care for unaccompanied youths in Sweden
2016 (English)In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 591-599Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The number of unaccompanied minors arriving in Sweden continues to rise. The majority are placed in residential care units. This qualitative study aims to increase the understanding given by the professionals to the concept of ‘home’ within the framework of residential care for unaccompanied young people. Data are based on participatory observations at two residential care units, followed up by individual interviews with staff. The findings confirm that the concept of home has a complex meaning involving both objective aspects such as physical buildings, and more subjective components that can be seen as state of mind. The staff's desire to offer an ‘ordinary home’ fails because of the surveillance, their dominant positions and especially due to the legal restrictions that were not initially meant for this target group. Unaccompanied young people have to be considered based on their own specific needs in order to make it possible for society to offer the most suitable care.

Keywords
child welfare, home, residential care, unaccompanied minors, asylum-seeking children
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-22910 (URN)10.1111/cfs.12183 (DOI)000386998800022 ()
Available from: 2015-01-09 Created: 2016-12-01 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Söderqvist, Å., Bülow, P. H. & Sjöblom, Y. (2015). "In Sweden work is more important than the culture, actually!": The care leaving process for unaccompanied youths from the perspective of social workers. Transnational Social Review, 5(3), 241-257
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"In Sweden work is more important than the culture, actually!": The care leaving process for unaccompanied youths from the perspective of social workers
2015 (English)In: Transnational Social Review, ISSN 2193-1674, E-ISSN 2196-145X, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 241-257Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In 2014 about 7000 unaccompanied minors applied for asylum in Sweden and a great part got to stay. Thus Sweden is one of the countries receiving the highest number in Europe. Previous research have shown that individuals with out-of-home care experiences belong to a vulnerable group. Besides that, young people with a migrant background sometimes experienced exclusion and discrimination. This study aim to explore social workers’ understanding of the unaccompanied youth’s minority backgrounds in relation to the process of leaving-care. With a qualitative approach data have been collected through focus-groups at two residential care units. Within this kind of Human service organizations the staff struggle with meeting the perceived needs of the youths based on their minority background. Alongside they are trying to teach what they considered as being good Swedish practices claimed being necessary when facing life outside care. A transnational perspective prevents an understanding of the unaccompanied youth’s context as static, but promotes rather a way of relating to both the youths past and present time in order to be prepared for the future.

Keywords
Unaccompanied minors, transnationalism, professionals, leaving-care
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23545 (URN)10.1080/21931674.2015.1082778 (DOI)
Projects
Unaccompanied youths, Out-of-home care placements and ethnicity (diss project)
Available from: 2015-11-19 Created: 2017-02-06 Last updated: 2018-04-20Bibliographically approved
Höjer, I. & Sjöblom, Y. (2014). Voices of 65 Young People Leaving Care in Sweden: "There Is So Much I Need to Know!". Australian Social Work, 67(1), 71-87
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Voices of 65 Young People Leaving Care in Sweden: "There Is So Much I Need to Know!"
2014 (English)In: Australian Social Work, ISSN 0312-407X, E-ISSN 1447-0748, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 71-87Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study is to examine young care leavers’ experiences of supportive and nonsupportive factors after leaving care. Telephone interviews were conducted with 65 young people, between 18 and 26 years old, who had left care in Sweden within the previous 3 months to 3 years. The care-leaving process was in many cases described by the young people as badly planned and compressed. Some interviewees received support from the formal network (social services, foster carers, residential homes, contact persons) for housing (37) and financial matters (36), but few received support from the formal network concerning employment (14) and education (11). Emotional support was mainly provided by partners and friends. Altogether, the results suggest that access to support is a helpful factor for young people leaving care, but also that many of our interviewees had no such access, from neither formal nor informal networks.

Keywords
Transition, Leaving Care, Young People, Social Capital, Support
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-22929 (URN)10.1080/0312407X.2013.863957 (DOI)000333986600006 ()
Available from: 2015-01-09 Created: 2016-12-01 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Höjer, I. & Sjöblom, Y. (2014). What Makes a Difference?: Turning Points for Young People in the Process of Leaving Placements in Public Care. Social Work & Society, 12(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What Makes a Difference?: Turning Points for Young People in the Process of Leaving Placements in Public Care
2014 (English)In: Social Work & Society, ISSN 1613-8953, E-ISSN 1613-8953, Vol. 12, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study is to examine young care leavers’ narrative accounts expressed as turning points connected to their experiences of being in care and leaving care. Telephone interviews were conducted with 65 young people, between 18 and 26 years old, who had left care in Sweden within the time span of previous three months to three years.

Altogether, the results suggest that there are both positive and negative turning points connected to the care experience for young care leavers. To develop a trusting relationship to a family member or a significant other, a feeling of being in control of your life and experience an opportunity to change a negative life course are important factors in the young care leaver’s accounts about turning points. These factors were also linked to how they interpreted their care experiences and the impact it had on their self-identity and well-being.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Duisburg-Essen: Center for Social Work and Social Policy, 2014
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-22930 (URN)
Available from: 2015-01-09 Created: 2016-12-01 Last updated: 2021-03-02Bibliographically approved
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