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Westerberg Jacobson, Josefin
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Westerberg Jacobson, J., Lindberg, M., Bjuhr, M. & Willmer, M. (2016). A wish to be thinner increases the odds for disturbed eating 20 years later. In: : . Paper presented at 2016 International Conference on Eating Disorders (ICED 2016, 5-7 May 2016, San Francisco, California, USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A wish to be thinner increases the odds for disturbed eating 20 years later
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background: Studies from various cultures show that a large number of adolescent girls have a wish to be thinner, and thus more often go on diets. The purpose of this longitudinal study was to examine if a wish to be thinner among Swedish girls contributes to the development of disturbed eating, and to describe motives for wishing to be thinner.

Methods: Following ethical approval (reg. no: 258/94; 2014/401) the Demographic and Dieting Questionnaire and the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire were used in a general population cohort of 7-11year-old-girls (n=462), 20 years later in October 2015.Threshold for DE was 1 SD above general population mean. Chi-square tests providing OR were used.

Results: A wish to be thinner during adolescence increases the likelihood 3-5 times to develop disturbed eating during the following 20-year period. Self-described motives for the wish to be thinner was to “correspond to the societal ideal” and to “dealing with difficulties”.

Conclusions: For prevention, it is of importance to detect girls who wish to be thinner as early as possible. By considering the girls’ motives, preventive efforts might be perceived as more meaningful and relevant to the girls at risk of developing eating disorders.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-21517 (URN)
Conference
2016 International Conference on Eating Disorders (ICED 2016, 5-7 May 2016, San Francisco, California, USA
Projects
IDA-projektet
Available from: 2016-05-23 Created: 2016-05-23 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved
Bjuhr, M., Westerberg Jacobson, J., Willmer, M. & Lindberg, M. (2016). Women with disturbed eating behavior rate less work engagement. In: : . Paper presented at 2016 International Conference on Eating Disorders(ICED 2016), 5-7 May 2016, San Francisco, California, USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Women with disturbed eating behavior rate less work engagement
2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

There is a lack of research exploring emotional commitment to work in relation to eating attitudes. Since eating disorders are associated with adverse psychological and social consequences, work engagement could be affected. The purpose was to compare work engagement among women with and without disturbed eating (DE).

A cross-sectional survey using the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale and the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire in a general population cohort of 26-36-year-old women (n=847). Threshold for DE was 1 SD above general population mean. Independent t-test was used to compare work engagement. Ethical approval (reg no:2014/401)

The level of work engagement was lower (p=0.02) among women with DE (mean 3.69 +-1.43) than women without DE (mean 4.06 +-1.18). The score for dedication was also lower (p=0.02) within the DE group (mean 3.74+-1.57 vs 4.22 +-1.26). However, vigour and absorption were not different.

The work engagement in the cohort was within the average range although women with DE had significantly lower emotional commitment to work. As work engagement is linked to business success, workplace growth and sustainability it seems important to explore tailored strategies to improve work engagement among women with DE.

National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-21516 (URN)
Conference
2016 International Conference on Eating Disorders(ICED 2016), 5-7 May 2016, San Francisco, California, USA
Projects
IDA-projektet
Available from: 2016-05-23 Created: 2016-05-23 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved
Engström, M., Westerberg Jacobson, J. & Mårtensson, G. (2015). Staff assessment of structural empowerment and ability to work according to evidence-based practice in mental health care. Journal of Nursing Management, 23(6), 765-774
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Staff assessment of structural empowerment and ability to work according to evidence-based practice in mental health care
2015 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 765-774Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To study associations between staff members' self-rated structural empowerment in mental health care, organisational type, and the ability and willingness to work according to evidence-based practice.

Method: Questionnaire data were collected from 253 mental health staff members.

Result: Multivariate logistic regressions analyses revealed that participants who scored higher on opportunity (OR 2.5) and were employed by the county council (OR 1.9) vs. the municipality were more likely to report high evidence-based practice ability. A generalised estimating equation taking into account unknown correlations within units found opportunity and resources to be significant predictors of evidence-based practice ability. Regarding evidence-based willingness, increased odds were found for higher scores of opportunity (OR 2.2) and being employed by the county council (OR 2.9). The generalised estimating equation also found resources to be a significant predictor of evidence-based willingness. In both organisations, the values for empowerment were moderate.

Conclusion: Structural conditions such as access to opportunities and resources are important for creating supporting structures for practice to be evidence-based. Implications for nursing management: Our results emphasise the managers' essential role in creating empowering structures, and especially access to opportunities and resources, for their staff to carry out evidence-based practice.

Keywords
Evidence-based practice, Mental health staff, Structural empowerment
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-15960 (URN)10.1111/jonm.12206 (DOI)000360840300009 ()24953085 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84940956441 (Scopus ID)
Projects
VIF
Available from: 2014-01-08 Created: 2014-01-08 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Mårtensson, G., Westerberg Jacobson, J. & Engström, M. (2014). Mental health nursing staff's attitudes towards mental illness: an analysis of related factors. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 21(9), 782-788
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mental health nursing staff's attitudes towards mental illness: an analysis of related factors
2014 (English)In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 21, no 9, p. 782-788Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Employer/workplaces have an impact on mental health nursing staff's general attitudes towards persons with mental illness. Staff have more positive attitudes if their knowledge about mental illness is less stigmatized and currently have or have once had a close friend with mental problem. More favourable attitudes among staff towards persons with mental illness could be developed and transmitted in the subculture at work places.

ABSTRACT: There is growing awareness that mental illness is surrounded by negative attitudes and stigmas. The aim of the present study was to investigate factors associated with mental health nursing staff's attitudes towards persons with mental illness. Data were collected from 256 mental health nursing staff employed by one county council and 10 municipalities. The findings show that staff have more positive attitudes towards persons with mental illness if their knowledge about mental illness is less stigmatized, their work places are in the county council, and they currently have or have once had a close friend with mental health problems. The multiple regression model explained 16% of the variance; stigma-related knowledge and employer had significant Beta-coefficients. To account for unknown correlations in data, a linear generalized estimating equation was performed. In this model, stigma-related knowledge and employer remained significant, but a new significant factor also emerged: personal contact, i.e. currently having or having once had a close friend with mental health problems. This indicates correlations at unit level in the county council and in the municipalities. The conclusion is that more favourable attitudes among staff towards persons with mental illness could be developed and transmitted in the subculture at work places.

Keywords
Quantitative methodology, Stigma
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-16452 (URN)10.1111/jpm.12145 (DOI)000344386200004 ()24654776 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84911367003 (Scopus ID)
Projects
VIF
Available from: 2014-03-27 Created: 2014-03-27 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Westerberg Jacobson, J. (2014). Talking with Children with Eating Disorders. In: Listening to the Children: . Paper presented at Listening to the Children, Nordic Congress, NoSB, Stockholm, 4-5 September 2014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Talking with Children with Eating Disorders
2014 (English)In: Listening to the Children, 2014Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-18895 (URN)
Conference
Listening to the Children, Nordic Congress, NoSB, Stockholm, 4-5 September 2014
Available from: 2015-01-30 Created: 2015-01-30 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Westerberg-Jacobson, J., Ghaderi, A. & Edlund, B. (2012). A longitudinal study of motives for wishing to be thinner and weight-control practices in 7- to 18-year-old Swedish girls. European eating disorders review, 20(4), 294-302
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A longitudinal study of motives for wishing to be thinner and weight-control practices in 7- to 18-year-old Swedish girls
2012 (English)In: European eating disorders review, ISSN 1072-4133, E-ISSN 1099-0968, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 294-302Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The main aim of this seven-year longitudinal study, of 411 Swedish pre-adolescent girls (aged 7-11 years, Year 1), was to examine a wish to be thinner, dieting attempts, described motives to be thinner and weight-control practices. A further aim was to examine to what extent body mass index (BMI) accounted for motives for wishing to be thinner and weight-control practices. A wish to be thinner and dieting attempts increased significantly with increasing age between the ages of 9 and 18. The most frequently reported motive for wishing to be thinner was to 'feel better about yourself'. Categories that emerged from the qualitative analysis of self-described motives for the wish to be thinner were, for example, to 'correspond to the societal ideal' and to 'wear particular clothes'. A majority of the girls adopted weight-control practices that would be considered as healthy, but extreme weight control practices increased with age. Girls with BMIs over the 75th percentile reported a greater number of motives for wishing to be thinner and used extreme weight-control practices significantly more often than the other girls. However, of the girls who changed BMI from above the 75th percentile to under the 75th percentile, 34,1% reported that they had not used any weight-control practices at all. Our results show that girls at a very early age are aware of the 'thin' ideal in our society, wish to be thinner and try to lose weight. The results point to the importance of detecting girls who wish to be thinner as early as possible. If we can employ preventive action in time, it is possible that dieting behaviour will never develop.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2012
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-10068 (URN)10.1002/erv.1145 (DOI)000305507100006 ()21800400 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84862768377 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-09-11 Created: 2011-09-11 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Westerberg Jacobson, J. & Edlund, B. (2012). Motives for Wishing to be Thinner and Weight-control Practices in 7 to 18-Year-Old Swedish Girls. In: Dr Paul Robinson, Chair, Organising Committe, EDIC 2012 (Ed.), : . Paper presented at Eating Disorders International Conference 2012, London 15-17 March.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Motives for Wishing to be Thinner and Weight-control Practices in 7 to 18-Year-Old Swedish Girls
2012 (English)In: / [ed] Dr Paul Robinson, Chair, Organising Committe, EDIC 2012, 2012Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-12787 (URN)
Conference
Eating Disorders International Conference 2012, London 15-17 March
Available from: 2012-09-12 Created: 2012-09-06 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Westerberg Jacobson, J. (2011). Wish to be thinner: Development and prediction of disturbed eating: A longitudinal study of Swedish girls and young women. In: Andreas Birgegård (Ed.), Wish to be thinner: Development and prediction of disturbed eating: A longitudinal study of Swedish girls and young women. Paper presented at Svenska Anorexi/Bulimisällskapets Höstmöte 2011.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wish to be thinner: Development and prediction of disturbed eating: A longitudinal study of Swedish girls and young women
2011 (English)In: Wish to be thinner: Development and prediction of disturbed eating: A longitudinal study of Swedish girls and young women / [ed] Andreas Birgegård, 2011Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate the development and prediction of disturbed eating attitudes in 7-20 year old girls. The four studies are part of a seven-year longitudinal project including 1279 girls in several age groups (7, 9, 11, 13, 15 years at inclusion) and their parents.Study I showed that among 11- and 13-year-old girls disturbed eating attitudes increased with increasing age, and that eating attitudes, higher BMI than peers, a less healthy relation to family, and fathers’ eating attitudes, predicted disturbed eating attitudes 2-years later. In study II girls in the ages 9-15 years who wished to be thinner dieted more often, thought that they would be more popular if they were thinner, were skipping meals more often and had a higher BMI compared to the girls without such a wish over five years. Study III demonstrated an increasing trend in the wish to be thinner and dieting attempts between the ages 9-18 years. Among 7-11-year old girls motives for wishing to be thinner were e.g., “feel better about yourself” and “correspond to the societal ideal”. A majority of the girls adopted healthy weight control practices, but also extreme weight control practices were used. In Study IV among 9 and 13-year old girls a wish to be thinner, fathers’ eating attitudes and mothers’ perfectionism contributed most to the prediction of disturbed eating attitudes 7-years later. Protective factors were low BMI, low to medium degree of perfectionism, more healthy eating attitudes and high self-esteem.

In conclusion a wish to be thinner, BMI, eating attitudes, family influences, self-esteem and perfectionism are important factors for development of disturbed eating attitudes in girls. The ‘thin ideal’ internalizes early in girls and it is important to take a critical stand to the thinness ideal in our society, especially in family and school.  

 

 

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-12786 (URN)
Conference
Svenska Anorexi/Bulimisällskapets Höstmöte 2011
Available from: 2012-09-06 Created: 2012-09-06 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Westerberg-Jacobson, J., Edlund, B. & Ghaderi, A. (2010). A 5-year longitudinal study of the relationship between the wish to be thinner, lifestyle behaviours and disturbed eating in 9-20-year old girls. European eating disorders review, 3(18), 207-219
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A 5-year longitudinal study of the relationship between the wish to be thinner, lifestyle behaviours and disturbed eating in 9-20-year old girls
2010 (English)In: European eating disorders review, ISSN 1072-4133, E-ISSN 1099-0968, Vol. 3, no 18, p. 207-219Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this 5-year longitudinal study of 593 girls (9-20 years) was to examine whether the internalization of the thinness ideal in terms of 'a wish to be thinner' might be related to lifestyle factors and longitudinally increase the risk of disturbed eating over time. Results showed that a wish to be thinner was related to lifestyle factors, eating attitudes and body mass index (BMI) longitudinally. Girls who wished to be thinner dieted more often, thought that they would be more popular if they were thinner, skipped meals, were eating breakfast more often alone and had a higher BMI compared to the girls without such a wish. Girls who wished to be thinner were 4 times more likely to develop disturbed eating attitudes over a 5-year period. These findings point to the importance of helping adolescents to establish regular eating habits, to avoid unhealthy dieting practices ant to prevent sedentary behaviours that might lead to overweight and or obesity in early childhood

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-10592 (URN)10.1002/erv.983 (DOI)000277333200005 ()20443204 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-09-30 Created: 2011-09-30 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Westerberg-Jacobson, J., Edlund, B. & Ghaderi, A. (2010). Risk and protective factors for disturbed eating: A 7-year longitudinal study of eating attitudes and psychological factors in adolescent girls and their parents. Eating and Weight Disorders, 15(4), E208-E218
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk and protective factors for disturbed eating: A 7-year longitudinal study of eating attitudes and psychological factors in adolescent girls and their parents
2010 (English)In: Eating and Weight Disorders, ISSN 1124-4909, E-ISSN 1590-1262, Vol. 15, no 4, p. E208-E218Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aims of this seven-year longitudinal study of 228 girls (9 and 13 year olds) were 1) to examine the predictive value of eating attitudes, a wish to be thinner, dieting, perfectionism, self-esteem and body mass index; 2) to examine the girls' parents' eating attitudes and perfectionism in relation to the development of disturbed eating attitudes, seven years later; and 3) to examine whether normal body weight, healthy eating attitudes and low perfectionism together with high self-esteem might operate as protective factors for the later development of disturbed eating attitudes. The pre-adolescent girls (9-years olds) "wish to be thinner" and fathers' eating attitudes contributed most to the prediction of disturbed eating attitudes seven years later. Corresponding analysis for the adolescent girls (13-year olds) showed that a "wish to be thinner" and mothers' rating on perfectionism contributed most to the prediction of disturbed eating attitudes seven years later. Protective factors were low BMI and more healthy eating attitudes - especially moderated by high self-esteem, and a low-to-medium degree of perfectionism. High self-esteem appeared to be a protective factor when the girls had a high degree of perfectionism. These results suggest that it is important to focus on healthy eating attitudes at home to prevent overweight in early childhood, enhance self-esteem and to take a critical stand toward the thinness ideal in our society 

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-10594 (URN)000293207700002 ()21406944 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-09-30 Created: 2011-09-30 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
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