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Hurtig, Anders
Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
MacCutcheon, D., Hurtig, A., Pausch, F., Hygge, S., Fels, J. & Ljung, R. (2019). Second language vocabulary level is related to benefits for second language listening comprehension under lower reverberation time conditions. Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 31(2), 175-185
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Second language vocabulary level is related to benefits for second language listening comprehension under lower reverberation time conditions
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Cognitive Psychology, ISSN 2044-5911, E-ISSN 2044-592X, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 175-185Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The acoustic qualities of a room can have a deleterious effect on the quality of speech signals. The acoustic measurement of reverberation time (RT) has shown to impact second language (L2) speech comprehension positively when lower due to release from spectral and temporal masking effects as well as top-down processing factors. This auralization experiment investigated the benefits of better L2 vocabulary and executive function (updating) skills during L2 listening comprehension tests under shorter versus longer RT conditions (0.3 and 0.9 s). 57 bilingual university students undertook L2 vocabulary, number updating and L2 listening comprehension tests. After splitting groups into high/low vocabulary and updating groups, a mixed ANOVA was conducted. The high number updating group showed no significant differences or interactions in L2 listening comprehension than the lower number updating group across RT conditions. The high vocabulary group had 22% better L2 listening comprehension than the low vocabulary group in long RT, and 9% better in short RT. A significant benefit in L2 listening comprehension due to release from reverberation was only evident in the high vocabulary group. Results indicate that the benefit of good room acoustics for listening comprehension is greatest for those with better language (vocabulary) ability.

Keywords
Reverberation time, Listening comprehension, Second language
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29173 (URN)10.1080/20445911.2019.1575387 (DOI)000461550600004 ()2-s2.0-85060842774 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, European Research Council, FP7/2007-2013EU, European Research Council, FP7-607139
Available from: 2019-01-25 Created: 2019-01-25 Last updated: 2019-10-23Bibliographically approved
Hurtig, A., Keus van de Poll, M., Pekkola, E., Hygge, S., Ljung, R. & Sörqvist, P. (2016). Children’s recall of words spoken in their first and second language: Effects of signal-to-noise ratio and reverberation time. Frontiers in Psychology, 6, Article ID 2029.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children’s recall of words spoken in their first and second language: Effects of signal-to-noise ratio and reverberation time
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2016 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 6, article id 2029Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Speech perception runs smoothly and automatically when there is silence in the background, but when the speech signal is degraded by background noise or by reverberation, effortful cognitive processing is needed to compensate for the signal distortion. Previous research has typically investigated the effects of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and reverberation time in isolation, whilst few have looked at their interaction. In this study, we probed how reverberation time and SNR influence recall of words presented in participants’ first- (L1) and second-language (L2). A total of 72 children (10 years old) participated in this study. The to-be-recalled wordlists were played back with two different reverberation times (0.3 and 1.2 sec) crossed with two different SNRs (+3 dBA and +12 dBA). Children recalled fewer words when the spoken words were presented in L2 in comparison with recall of spoken words presented in L1. Words that were presented with a high SNR (+12 dBA) improved recall compared to a low SNR (+3 dBA). Reverberation time interacted with SNR to the effect that at +12 dB the shorter reverberation time improved recall, but at +3 dB it impaired recall. The effects of the physical sound variables (SNR and reverberation time) did not interact with language.

Keywords
Children, Speech Perception, reverberation time, signal-to-noise ratio, Second-language, classroom acoustics
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-20903 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2015.02029 (DOI)000368055900001 ()26834665 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84959420428 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 242-2010-1006
Available from: 2015-12-19 Created: 2015-12-19 Last updated: 2019-10-23Bibliographically approved
Hurtig, A., Sörqvist, P., Ljung, R., Hygge, S. & Rönnberg, J. (2016). Student's second-language grade may depend on classroom listening position. PLoS ONE, 11(6), Article ID e0156533.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Student's second-language grade may depend on classroom listening position
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2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 6, article id e0156533Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this experiment was to explore whether listening positions (close or distant location from the sound source) in the classroom, and classroom reverberation, influence students’ score on a test for second-language (L2) listening comprehension (i.e., comprehension of English in Swedish speaking participants). The listening comprehension test administered was part of a standardized national test of English used in the Swedish school system. A total of 125 high school pupils, 15 years old, participated. Listening position was manipulated within subjects, classroom reverberation between subjects. The results showed that L2 listening comprehension decreased as distance from the sound source increased. The effect of reverberation was qualified by the participants’ baseline L2 proficiency. A shorter reverberation was beneficial to participants with high L2 proficiency, while the opposite pattern was found among the participants with low L2 proficiency. The results indicate that listening comprehension scores—and hence students’ grade in English—may depend on students’ classroom listening position.

Keywords
adolescent, comprehension, high school, human, human experiment, language, sound, speech, student
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-21515 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0156533 (DOI)000377824800016 ()27295546 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84976293629 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, A0204201Swedish Research Council Formas, 2010-1006
Available from: 2016-05-23 Created: 2016-05-23 Last updated: 2019-10-23Bibliographically approved
Hurtig, A., Keus van de Poll, M., Pekkola, E. & Hygge, S. (2015). Recall of spoken words in English and Swedish heard at different signal-to-noise ratios and different reverberation times: Children aged 10-11 years. In: : . Paper presented at BCEP 2015, 11th Biennial Conference on Environmental Psychology, Bridging theory and practice: inspiring the future of environmental psychology, 24-26 August 2015,Groningen, The Netherlands.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recall of spoken words in English and Swedish heard at different signal-to-noise ratios and different reverberation times: Children aged 10-11 years
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Noise impairs speech perception which in turn makes memory and learning more difficult. School children are expected to be particularly vulnerable to the negative effects of noise. In this study we varied reverberation time (RT) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to see how they affected recall of words in Swedish (native tongue) and English. Participants were 72 children in the fourth grade who listened to wordlists presented in Swedish and English with broadband noise in the background. We compared two reverberation time (RT) conditions: a short RT (0.3 sec.) and a long RT (1.2 sec.), and two signal-to-noise (SNR) conditions: a low SNR (+3 dB) and a high SNR (+12 dB). Each wordlist had 8 words to be recalled. Main effects of language and SNR were found. Children could recall fewer words if they were presented in English or had a low SNR. Interactions were found between Language, RT, SNR and whether the words were at the beginning, in the middle or at the end of the wordlists. Recall performance was best with a short RT and a high SNR. Fourth graders recalled more words in their native language compared to English. Children might have difficulties with semantic association and understanding the meaning of words in English. Recall performance was markedly improved with good listening conditions, which indicates that there is something to be gained by improving the acoustical conditions in a classroom to improve memory and learning.

National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-20344 (URN)
Conference
BCEP 2015, 11th Biennial Conference on Environmental Psychology, Bridging theory and practice: inspiring the future of environmental psychology, 24-26 August 2015,Groningen, The Netherlands
Available from: 2015-09-28 Created: 2015-09-28 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
Hurtig, A., Hygge, S., Kjellberg, A., Nöstl, A., Keus van de Poll, M., Ljung, R. & Sörqvist, P. (2014). Acoustical conditions in the classroom: Recall of spoken words in English and Swedish heard at different signal-to-noise ratios. In: 11th International Congress on Noise as a Public Health Problem (ICBEN), Nara, Japan, 1-5 June, 2014: . Paper presented at 11th International Congress on Noise as a Public Health Problem (ICBEN), Nara, Japan, 1-5 June, 2014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acoustical conditions in the classroom: Recall of spoken words in English and Swedish heard at different signal-to-noise ratios
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2014 (English)In: 11th International Congress on Noise as a Public Health Problem (ICBEN), Nara, Japan, 1-5 June, 2014, 2014Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-17207 (URN)
Conference
11th International Congress on Noise as a Public Health Problem (ICBEN), Nara, Japan, 1-5 June, 2014
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2010-01006
Available from: 2014-06-30 Created: 2014-06-30 Last updated: 2019-10-23Bibliographically approved
Sörqvist, P., Hurtig, A., Ljung, R. & Rönnberg, J. (2014). High second-language proficiency protects against the effects of reverberation on listening comprehension. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 55(2), 91-96
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High second-language proficiency protects against the effects of reverberation on listening comprehension
2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 91-96Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this experiment was to investigate whether classroom reverberation influences second-language (L2) listening comprehension. Moreover, we investigated whether individual differences in baseline L2 proficiency and in working memory capacity (WMC) modulate the effect of reverberation time on L2 listening comprehension. The results showed that L2 listening comprehension decreased as reverberation time increased. Participants with higher baseline L2 proficiency were less susceptible to this effect. WMC was also related to the effect of reverberation (although just barely significant), but the effect of WMC was eliminated when baseline L2 proficiency was statistically controlled. Taken together, the results suggest that top-down cognitive capabilities support listening in adverse conditions. Potential implications for the Swedish national tests in English are discussed.

Keywords
Comprehension; Reverberation; Second language; Speech perception; Working memory capacity
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-16023 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12115 (DOI)000333054400001 ()24646043 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84896374157 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-01-16 Created: 2014-01-16 Last updated: 2019-10-23Bibliographically approved
Hygge, S., Nöstl, A., Hurtig, A., Haga, A. & Holmgren, M. (2014). Recall of spoken word lists in English and native Swedish presented at different signal-to-noise ratios and different reverberation times: A comparison between children aged 10-11 years and college students. In: 11th International Congress on Noise as a Public Health Problem (ICBEN), Nara, Japan, 1-5 June, 2014: . Paper presented at 11th International Congress on Noise as a Public Health Problem (ICBEN), Nara, Japan, 1-5 June, 2014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recall of spoken word lists in English and native Swedish presented at different signal-to-noise ratios and different reverberation times: A comparison between children aged 10-11 years and college students
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2014 (English)In: 11th International Congress on Noise as a Public Health Problem (ICBEN), Nara, Japan, 1-5 June, 2014, 2014Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Two experiments will be presented which assessed free recall of spoken words in Swedish (native tongue) and in English heard under different signal-to-noise ratios (SNR: +3 and +12 dB), and different reverberation times (RT: 0.3 and 1.2 s). All participants encountered these eight experimental conditions (Language*SNR*RT). The first experiment was run with college student (N=48), who were run individually. In the second experiment children in grade 4 (10-11 years, N=72) took part and they were run as a group in their regular classrooms.

Twelve wordlists in English and twelve wordlists in Swedish were generated. The words were chosen according to their ranks in category norms for the two languages. The number of words in each list was 12 for the college group and 8 for children in Grade 4. The 2 x 12 wordlists were presented in counter balanced presentation orders in three blocks (Blocks). To compare primacy and recency effects the word lists were divided into three parts (p3rd). After each wordlist the participants typed in or wrote down the words they could recall.

The basic hypotheses for the recall of the words were that working memory would be overloaded when the SNR was low and the RT was long, and that SNR and RT would interact with each other, with Language and with Study (Grade4/College). The analyses suggest that for both groups there were expected effects of language and of SNR, but the effect of RT was smaller and only showed up in interactions.

National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-17208 (URN)
Conference
11th International Congress on Noise as a Public Health Problem (ICBEN), Nara, Japan, 1-5 June, 2014
Available from: 2014-06-30 Created: 2014-06-30 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
Hygge, S., Nöstl, A., Hurtig, A., Haga, A. & Holmgren, M. (2014). Recall of spoken words in English and Swedish heard at different signal-to-noise ratios and different reverberation times: Children aged 10-11 years and college students. In: 28th International Congress of Applied Psychology (ICAP 2014), Paris, France, 8-13 July, 2014: Abstracts. Paper presented at 28th International Congress of Applied Psychology (ICAP 2014), Paris, France, 8-13 July, 2014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recall of spoken words in English and Swedish heard at different signal-to-noise ratios and different reverberation times: Children aged 10-11 years and college students
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2014 (English)In: 28th International Congress of Applied Psychology (ICAP 2014), Paris, France, 8-13 July, 2014: Abstracts, 2014Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Two experiments will be presented which assessed free recall of spoken words in Swedish (native tongue) and in English heard under different signal-to-noise (SN) ratios (+3 and +12 dB), and different reverberation time (RT, .3 and 1.2 sec). All participants encountered all eight experimental conditions (Language*SN*RT). The first experiment was run with college student (N=48) and they were run individually. In the second experiment children in grade 4 (10-11 years, N=72) took part and they were run in the regular classrooms.

Twelve wordlists in Swedish and twelve wordlists in English generated. The words were chosen according to their ranks in category norms for the two languages, and no category was the same for the two languages. The number of words in each list was 12 for the college group and 8 for grade four. The 2 x 12 wordlists were presented in counter balanced presentation orders in three blocks. Within each block order of S/N and RT was also counterbalanced. After each wordlist the participants wrote down the words they could recall. Pre-experimental measures of working memory capacity were also taken.

The basic hypotheses for the recall of the words were that working memory would be overloaded when the SN-ratio was low and the RT was long, and that SN and RT would interact with each other, with Language and with Age-group.

To compare primacy and recency effects the word lists were divided into three parts (p3rd). After each wordlist the participants typed in or wrote down the words they could recall.

The basic hypotheses for the recall of the words were that working memory would be overloaded when the SNR was low and the RT was long, and that SNR and RT would interact with each other, with Language and with Study (Grade4/College). The analyses suggest that for both groups there were expected effects of language and of SNR, but the effect of RT was smaller and only showed up in interactions.

Keywords
Children and adults, Memory and learning, Noise, Signal-to-noise ratios and reverberation time
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-17205 (URN)
Conference
28th International Congress of Applied Psychology (ICAP 2014), Paris, France, 8-13 July, 2014
Available from: 2014-06-30 Created: 2014-06-30 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
Hygge, S., Kjellberg, A., Nöstl, A., Keus, M., Hurtig, A., Ljung, R. & Sörqvist, P. (2013). Acoustical conditions in the classroom II: Recall of spoken words in English and Swedish heard at different signal-to-noise ratios. In: 42nd International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering 2013, INTER-NOISE 2013: Noise Control for Quality of Life: . Paper presented at InterNoise 2013, Innsbruck, Sept 15-18, 2013 (invited speaker) (pp. 5091-5098).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acoustical conditions in the classroom II: Recall of spoken words in English and Swedish heard at different signal-to-noise ratios
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2013 (English)In: 42nd International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering 2013, INTER-NOISE 2013: Noise Control for Quality of Life, 2013, p. 5091-5098Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

An experiment will be reported which assessed speech intelligibility and free recall of spoken words in Swedish (native tongue) and in English heard under different signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios (+3 and +12 dB), and with/without the spoken words being repeated back orally directly after presentation (shadowing). All participants encountered all experimental conditions. Twelve wordlists with 12 words each were generated in English as well as in Swedish. The words were chosen according to their ranks in category norms for the two languages, and no category was the same for the two languages. Blocks of counter balanced presentation orders, S/N-ratios and shadowing/no shadowing were generated. After each wordlist the participants wrote down the words they could recall. Pre-experimental measures of working memory capacity were taken. The basic hypotheses for the recall of the words were that working memory would be overloaded when the S/N-ratio was low, there was no shadowing and when the language was English. A low score on working memory capacity was expected to further enhance these effects. While writing this abstract data collection is still in progress but results will be presented at the conference.

National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-15064 (URN)2-s2.0-84904489293 (Scopus ID)
Conference
InterNoise 2013, Innsbruck, Sept 15-18, 2013 (invited speaker)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2010-01006
Available from: 2013-08-23 Created: 2013-08-23 Last updated: 2019-10-23Bibliographically approved
Hurtig, A. (2012). Masked- and unmasked speech, effects recollection of semantically categorized words. In: APCAM 11th annual meeting Minneapolis November 15 2012 (at the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel). Paper presented at APCAM 11th annual meeting Minneapolis November 15 2012.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Masked- and unmasked speech, effects recollection of semantically categorized words
2012 (English)In: APCAM 11th annual meeting Minneapolis November 15 2012 (at the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel), 2012Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-13446 (URN)
Conference
APCAM 11th annual meeting Minneapolis November 15 2012
Available from: 2012-11-29 Created: 2012-11-26 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
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