hig.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Eriksson, Mårten
Publications (10 of 29) Show all publications
Eriksson, M. (2017). The Swedish Communicative Development Inventory III: Parent reports on language in preschool children. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 41(5), 647-654
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Swedish Communicative Development Inventory III: Parent reports on language in preschool children
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Development, ISSN 0165-0254, E-ISSN 1464-0651, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 647-654Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A revised form of MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory III (SCDI-III) was presented designed for Swedish speakingchildren aged 2 years 6 months–4 years 0 months with the objective to give a proxy measure of their language competence. The instrumentcontains a vocabulary checklist with 100 words, mainly predicates, from four areas; Food words, Body words, Mental words and Emotionwords. Two sections assess the child’s grammar skills and a final section appraises the child’s metalinguistic awareness. Assessments from1,134 parents are reported. Scales with adequate psychometric properties were formed for each section. Monthly median values andspread of score distributions are presented for each scale. Girls scored higher than boys on all scales. The revision, sampling procedures,demographic variables and issues of reliability and validity, are discussed. The general structure of the instrument can well be integrated insimilar instruments designed for other languages and cultures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keyword
assessment, child language, language development, parental reports
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-21427 (URN)10.1177/0165025416644078 (DOI)000407648100010 ()28890587 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85027449886 (Scopus ID)
Note

Finansierat av Kempe-Carlgrenska stiftelsen

Available from: 2016-04-21 Created: 2016-04-21 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Langeborg, L. & Eriksson, M. (2016). Anchoring in numeric judgments of visual stimuli. Frontiers in Psychology, 7, Article ID 225.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anchoring in numeric judgments of visual stimuli
2016 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 7, article id 225Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article investigates effects of anchoring in age estimation and estimation of quantities, two tasks which to different extents are based on visual stimuli. The results are compared to anchoring in answers to classic general knowledge questions that rely on semantic knowledge. Cognitive load was manipulated to explore possible differences between domains. Effects of source credibility, manipulated by differing instructions regarding the selection of anchor values (no information regarding anchor selection, information that the anchors are randomly generated or information that the anchors are answers from an expert) on anchoring were also investigated. Effects of anchoring were large for all types of judgments but were not affected by cognitive load or by source credibility in either one of the researched domains. A main effect of cognitive load on quantity estimations and main effects of source credibility in the two visually based domains indicate that the manipulations were efficient. Implications for theoretical explanations of anchoring are discussed. In particular, because anchoring did not interact with cognitive load, the results imply that the process behind anchoring in visual tasks is predominantly automatic and unconscious.

Keyword
anchoring effects, decision making, age estimation, cognitive load, judgment, source credibility
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-21268 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00225 (DOI)000370598000001 ()26941684 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-02-23 Created: 2016-02-23 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Boman, E., Eriksson, M. & Svedberg, P. (2016). Is perceived autonomy associated with health-related quality of life among adolescents?. Quality of Life Research, 25, 85-85
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is perceived autonomy associated with health-related quality of life among adolescents?
2016 (English)In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 25, p. 85-85Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-24321 (URN)000398451600201 ()
Available from: 2017-06-16 Created: 2017-06-16 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Skoog Waller, S. & Eriksson, M. (2016). Vocal age disguise: the role of fundamental frequency and speech rate and  its perceived effects. Frontiers in Psychology, 7, Article ID 1814.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vocal age disguise: the role of fundamental frequency and speech rate and  its perceived effects
2016 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 7, article id 1814Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The relationship between vocal characteristics and perceived age is of interest in various contexts, as is the possibility to affect age perception through vocal manipulation. A few examples of such situations are when age is staged by actors, when ear witnesses make age assessments based on vocal cues only or when offenders disguise their voice to appear younger or older. This paper investigates how speakers spontaneously manipulate two age related vocal characteristics (f0 and speech rate) in attempt to sound younger versus older than their true age, and if the manipulation corresponds to actual age related changes in f0 and speech rate (Study 1). Further aims of the paper is to determine how successful vocal age disguise is by asking listeners to estimate the age of generated speech samples (Study 2) and to examine whether or not listeners use f0 and speech rate as cues to perceived age. In Study 1, participants from three age groups (20-25, 40-45 and 60-65 years) agreed to read a short text under three voice conditions. There were 12 speakers in each age group (six women and six men). They used their natural voice in one condition, attempted to sound 20 years younger in another and 20 years older in a third condition. In Study 2, 60 participants (listeners) listened to speech samples from the three voice conditions in Study 1 and estimated the speakers’ age. Each listener was exposed to all three voice conditions. The results from Study 1 indicated that the speakers increased fundamental frequency (f0) and speech rate when attempting to sound younger and decreased f0 and speech rate when attempting to sound older. Study 2 showed that the voice manipulations had an effect in the sought-after direction, although the achieved mean effect was only 3 years, which is far less than the intended effect of 20 years. Moreover, listeners used speech rate, but not f0, as a cue to speaker age. It was concluded that age disguise by voice can be achieved by naïve speakers even though the perceived effect was smaller than intended.

Keyword
age disguise, voice disguise, age estimation, fundamental frequency, speech rate, voice manipulation, deception, age perception
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-22991 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01814 (DOI)000388125700001 ()27917144 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85006355933 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-08 Created: 2016-12-08 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Skoog Waller, S., Eriksson, M. & Sörqvist, P. (2015). Can you hear my age?: Influences of speech rate and speech spontaneity on estimation of speaker age. Frontiers in Psychology, 6, Article ID 978.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can you hear my age?: Influences of speech rate and speech spontaneity on estimation of speaker age
2015 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 6, article id 978Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cognitive hearing science is mainly about the study of how cognitive factors contribute to speech comprehension, but cognitive factors also partake in speech processing to infer non-linguistic information from speech signals, such as the intentions of the talker and the speaker’s age. Here, we report two experiments on age estimation by “naïve” listeners. The aim was to study how speech rate influences estimation of speaker age by comparing the speakers’ natural speech rate with increased or decreased speech rate. In Experiment 1, listeners were presented with audio samples of read speech from three different speaker age groups (young, middle aged, and old adults). They estimated the speakers as younger when speech rate was faster than normal and as older when speech rate was slower than normal. This speech rate effect was slightly greater in magnitude for older (60–65 years) speakers in comparison with younger (20–25 years) speakers, suggesting that speech rate may gain greater importance as a perceptual age cue with increased speaker age. This pattern was more pronounced in Experiment 2, in which listeners estimated age from spontaneous speech. Faster speech rate was associated with lower age estimates, but only for older and middle aged (40–45 years) speakers. Taken together, speakers of all age groups were estimated as older when speech rate decreased, except for the youngest speakers in Experiment 2. The absence of a linear speech rate effect in estimates of younger speakers, for spontaneous speech, implies that listeners use different age estimation strategies or cues (possibly vocabulary) depending on the age of the speaker and the spontaneity of the speech. Potential implications for forensic investigations and other applied domains are discussed.

Keyword
age estimation, speech perception, speech rate, cognitive speech processing, speech spontaneity
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-19836 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00978 (DOI)000358224100001 ()26236259 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-06-22 Created: 2015-06-22 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, M., Vidman, Å. & Josefsson, B. (2014). Vad i arbete är hälsofrämjande?. In: Fereshteh Ahmadi & Sam Larsson (Ed.), Hälsa, livsmiljö och arbetsliv: ur ett socialt arbete-perspektiv (pp. 43-59). Gävle: Gävle University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vad i arbete är hälsofrämjande?
2014 (Swedish)In: Hälsa, livsmiljö och arbetsliv: ur ett socialt arbete-perspektiv / [ed] Fereshteh Ahmadi & Sam Larsson, Gävle: Gävle University Press , 2014, p. 43-59Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Gävle: Gävle University Press, 2014
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-18764 (URN)978-91-977592-8-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-01-15 Created: 2015-01-15 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Svedberg, P., Eriksson, M. & Boman, E. (2013). Associations between scores of psychosomatic health symptoms and health-related quality of life in children and adolescents. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 11(176)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between scores of psychosomatic health symptoms and health-related quality of life in children and adolescents
2013 (English)In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 11, no 176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The aims of the present study are to investigate whether there are differences in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) between girls and boys in two different age groups, to study how much of children’s variance in HRQoL can be explained by common psychosomatic health symptoms, and to examine whether the same set of psychosomatic symptoms can explain differences in HRQoL, both between girls and boys and between older and younger school children.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted of 253 children, 99 of ages 11-12 years (n=51 girls, n=48 boys) and 154 of ages 15-16 years (n=82 girls, n=72 boys), in Swedish schools. The KIDSCREEN-52 instrument, which covers 10 dimensions of HRQoL and additional questions about psychosomatic health symptoms, were used. Analyses of variance were conducted to investigate differences between the genders and age groups, and in interaction effects on the KIDSCEEN-52 dimensions. Regression analyses were used to investigate the impacts of psychosomatic symptoms on gender and age group differences in HRQoL.

Results: Boys rated themselves higher than girls on the KIDSCREEN dimensions: physical and psychological well-being, moods and emotions, self-perception, and autonomy. Main effects of age group were found for physical well-being, psychological well-being, moods and emotions, self-perception, autonomy, and school environment, where younger children rated their HRQoL more highly than those aged 15-16 years. Girls rated their moods and emotions dramatically lower than boys in the older age group, but the ratings of emotional status were more similar between genders at younger ages. Psychosomatic symptoms explained between 27% and 50% of the variance in the children’s HRQoL. Sleeping difficulties were a common problem for both girls and boys. Depression and concentration difficulties were particularly associated with HRQoL among girls whereas stomach aches were associated with HRQoL among boys.  

Conclusions: Girls and adolescents experience poorer HRQoL than boys and younger children, but having psychosomatic symptoms seem to explain a substantial part of the variation. Strategies to promote health among school children, in particular to alleviate sleep problems among all children, depression and concentration difficulties among girls, and stomach aches among boys, are of great importance.

Keyword
Health, Quality of Life, Gender, School, Children, Adolescents, Psychomatic symptoms, Slee problems, KIDSCREEN
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-15977 (URN)10.1186/1477-7525-11-176 (DOI)000328557200001 ()2-s2.0-84886076750 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-01-10 Created: 2014-01-09 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, M. (2013). Substantivsturbo hos tvåspråkiga barn. In: : . Paper presented at XIII Nordiska Barnspråkssymposiet, Stockholm, 8–9 november 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Substantivsturbo hos tvåspråkiga barn
2013 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Många studier har hävdat att barn lär sig substantiv före verb och adjektiv, bland annat för att enkla substantiv har en klarare relation till det de betecknar än vad andra ord har (Gentner, 1978; 1982). Det har också hävdats att barn tillämpar en kontrastprincip i den tidiga ordinlärningen som gör att de inte lär sig synonymer (Clark, 1987; 1988). Samtidigt tvåspråkiga barn har enligt samma tanke inte tillägnat sig tvärspråkliga synonymer, dvs två språks ord för samma sak (Volterra & Teaschner, 1978). Inget av dessa påståenden har visat sig vara helt sant. I föreliggande studie undersöks sammansättningen av det tidiga ordförrådet hos 19 barn mellan 16 och 28 månader som växer upp i en finsk-svensk språkig omgivning. Uppgifter om barnens ordförråd inhämtades med den svenska och finska versionen av MB-CDI. Resultatet visar på en hög andel tvärspråkliga synonymer och att tvärspråkliga synonymer var speciellt vanliga för substantiv. Konsekvenser för kontrastprincipen och möjligheten att designa studier som prövar allmänna principer för språktillägnande i tvåspråkiga miljöer diskuteras.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-15994 (URN)
Conference
XIII Nordiska Barnspråkssymposiet, Stockholm, 8–9 november 2013
Projects
Förskolebarns språk
Note

Finansieras från Kempe Carlgrenska Stiftelsen

Available from: 2014-01-13 Created: 2014-01-13 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, M., Marschik, P. B., Tulviste, T., Almgren, M., Pérez Pereira, M., Wehberg, S., . . . Gallego, C. (2012). Differences between girls and boys in emerging language skills: Evidence from 10 language communities. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 30(2), 326-343
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences between girls and boys in emerging language skills: Evidence from 10 language communities
Show others...
2012 (English)In: British Journal of Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0261-510X, E-ISSN 2044-835X, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 326-343Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study explored gender differences in emerging language skills in 13,783 European children from 10 non-English language communities. It was based on a synthesis of published data assessed with adapted versions of the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories (CDIs) from age 0;08-2;06. The results showed that girls are slightly ahead of boys in early communicative gestures, in productive vocabulary and in combining words. The difference increased with age. Boys were not found to be more variable than girls. Despite extensive variation in language skills between language communities, the difference between girls and boys remained. This suggests that the difference is caused by robust factors that do not change between language communities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: John Wiley & Sons, 2012
Keyword
emergent language, language acquisition, gender differences
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-9238 (URN)10.1111/j.2044-835X.2011.02042.x (DOI)000303495700006 ()2-s2.0-84860520352 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-05-06 Created: 2011-05-06 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Sörqvist, P., Langeborg, L. & Eriksson, M. (2011). Women Assimilate across Gender, Men Don’t: The Role of Gender to the Own-Anchor Effect in Age, Height and Weight Estimates. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 41(7), 1733-1748
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Women Assimilate across Gender, Men Don’t: The Role of Gender to the Own-Anchor Effect in Age, Height and Weight Estimates
2011 (English)In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology, ISSN 0021-9029, E-ISSN 1559-1816, Vol. 41, no 7, p. 1733-1748Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper reports two studies of the own-anchor effect (i.e., assimilation in age, height and weight estimates) in same- and cross-gender age, height and weight estimates. The own-anchor effect is believed to be stronger for same-gender estimates, but the investigation reported here is the first to test this hypothesis with participants and target persons of both genders. Several own-anchor effects were found in females’ same- and cross-gender estimates, whereas males only showed own-anchor effects in same-gender estimates. These results lean towards the possibility that women assimilate across gender, whereas men do not. Explanations of these results with reference to Krueger’s theory of social projection and the consequences for witness reliability are discussed.

Keyword
age estimation, height estimation, weight estimation, own-anchor effect, gender differences
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-5042 (URN)10.1111/j.1559-1816.2011.00774.x (DOI)000292648500007 ()2-s2.0-79960262627 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-08-17 Created: 2009-08-17 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications