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Marsh, John E.
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Publications (10 of 41) Show all publications
Marois, A., Marsh, J. E. & Vachon, F. (2019). Is auditory distraction by changing-state and deviant sounds underpinned by the same mechanism?: Evidence from pupillometry. Biological Psychology, 141, 64-74
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is auditory distraction by changing-state and deviant sounds underpinned by the same mechanism?: Evidence from pupillometry
2019 (English)In: Biological Psychology, ISSN 0301-0511, E-ISSN 1873-6246, Vol. 141, p. 64-74Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The mere presence of task-irrelevant auditory stimuli is known to interfere with cognitive functioning. Disruption can be caused by changing auditory distractors (the changing-state effect) or by a sound that deviates from the auditory background (the deviation effect). The unitary account of auditory distraction explains both phenomena in terms of attentional capture whereas the duplex-mechanism account posits that they reflect two fundamentally different forms of distraction in which only the deviation effect is caused by attentional capture. To test these predictions, we exploited a physiological index of attention orienting: the pupillary dilation response (PDR). Participants performed visual serial recall while ignoring sequences of spoken letters. These sequences either comprised repeated or changing letters, and one letter could sometimes be replaced by pink noise (the deviant). Recall was poorer in both changing-state and deviant trials. Interestingly, the PDR was elicited by deviant sounds but not changing-state sounds, while a tonic increase in pupil size was found throughout changing-state trials. This physiological dissociation of the changing-state and the deviation effects suggests they are subtended by distinct mechanisms thereby procuring support for the duplex-mechanism account over the unitary account.

Keywords
Auditory distraction; Pupillometry; Irrelevant sound; Attention capture; Interference-by-process
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29331 (URN)10.1016/j.biopsycho.2019.01.002 (DOI)000456014300008 ()30633950 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059804020 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-01116
Note

Funding agency:

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) Grant no:  418623-2013

Available from: 2019-02-27 Created: 2019-02-27 Last updated: 2019-03-01Bibliographically approved
Campbell, T. A. & Marsh, J. E. (2019). On corticopetal-corticofugal loops of the new early filter: from cell assemblies to the rostral brainstem. NeuroReport, 30(3), 202-206
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On corticopetal-corticofugal loops of the new early filter: from cell assemblies to the rostral brainstem
2019 (English)In: NeuroReport, ISSN 0959-4965, E-ISSN 1473-558X, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 202-206Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NLM (Medline), 2019
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29374 (URN)10.1097/WNR.0000000000001184 (DOI)000459194800010 ()30702551 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060958439 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-01116
Available from: 2019-03-12 Created: 2019-03-12 Last updated: 2019-03-12Bibliographically approved
Marsh, J. (2018). Can intrinsic and extrinsic metacognitive cues shield against distraction in problem solving?. Journal of cognition, 1(1), Article ID 15.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can intrinsic and extrinsic metacognitive cues shield against distraction in problem solving?
2018 (English)In: Journal of cognition, E-ISSN 2514-4820, Vol. 1, no 1, article id 15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We investigated the capacity for two different forms of metacognitive cue to shield against auditory distraction in problem solving with Compound Remote Associates Tasks (CRATs). Experiment 1 demonstrated that an intrinsic metacognitive cue in the form of processing disfluency (manipulated using an easy-to-read vs. difficult-to-read font) could increase focal task engagement so as to mitigate the detrimental impact of distraction on solution rates for CRATs. Experiment 2 showed that an extrinsic metacognitive cue that took the form of an incentive for good task performance (i.e., 80% or better CRAT solutions) could likewise eliminate the negative impact of distraction on CRAT solution rates. Overall, these findings support the view that both intrinsic and extrinsic metacognitive cues have remarkably similar effects. This suggests that metacognitive cues operate via a common underlying mechanism whereby a participant applies increased focal attention to the primary task so as to ensure more steadfast task engagement that is not so easily diverted by task-irrelevant stimuli.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25728 (URN)10.5334/joc.9 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-12-04 Created: 2017-12-04 Last updated: 2018-06-26Bibliographically approved
Campbell, T. A. & Marsh, J. E. (2018). Commentary: Donepezil enhances understanding of degraded speech in Alzheimer's disease. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 10, Article ID 197.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Commentary: Donepezil enhances understanding of degraded speech in Alzheimer's disease
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, ISSN 1663-4365, E-ISSN 1663-4365, Vol. 10, article id 197Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
Alzheimer's dementia (AD), Cognitive hearing science, Donepezil (aricept), New early filter model, Sinewave speech perception
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27646 (URN)10.3389/fnagi.2018.00197 (DOI)000438521700001 ()30057546 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85050195136 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-01116
Note

A commentary on Donepezil enhances understanding of degraded speech in Alzheimer’s disease by Hardy, C. J. D., Hwang, Y. T., Bond, R. L., Marshall, C. R., Ridha, B. H., Crutch, S. J., et al. (2017). Ann. Clin. Transl. Neurol. 4, 835–840. doi: 10.1002/acn3.471.

Available from: 2018-08-15 Created: 2018-08-15 Last updated: 2019-03-12Bibliographically approved
Joseph, T., Hughes, R., Sörqvist, P. & Marsh, J. (2018). Differences in auditory distraction between adults and children: A duplex-mechanism approach. Journal of Cognition, 1(1), Article ID 13.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences in auditory distraction between adults and children: A duplex-mechanism approach
2018 (English)In: Journal of Cognition, E-ISSN 2514-4820, Vol. 1, no 1, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Differences in the impact of irrelevant sound on recall performance in children (aged 7-9 years old; N = 89) compared to adults (aged 18-22 years old; N = 89) were examined. Tasks that required serial rehearsal (serial and probed-order recall tasks) were contrasted with one that did not (the missing-item task) in the presence of irrelevant sound that was either steady-state (a repeated speech token), changing-state (two alternating speech tokens) and, for the first time with a child sample, could also contain a deviant token (a male-voice token embedded in a sequence otherwise spoken in a female voice). Participants either completed tasks in which the to-be-remembered list-length was adjusted to individual digit span or was fixed at one item greater than the average span we observed for the age-group. The disruptive effects of irrelevant sound did not vary across the two methods of determining list-length. We found that tasks encouraging serial rehearsal were especially affected by changing-state sequences for both age-groups (i.e., the changing-state effect) and there were no group differences in relation to this effect. In contrast, disruption by a deviant sound—generally assumed to be the result of attentional diversion—was evident among children in all three tasks while adults were less susceptible to this effect. This pattern of results suggests that developmental differences in distraction are due to differences in attentional control rather than serial rehearsal efficiency.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Ubiquity Press, 2018
Keywords
Attention; Cognitive Control; Development of cognition; Working memory
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26075 (URN)10.5334/joc.15 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-01-29 Created: 2018-01-29 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Marois, A., Dube, F.-L., Marsh, J. E. & Vachon, F. (2018). Is auditory distraction by changing and deviant sounds underpinned by the same mechanism?: Evidence from pupillometry. Paper presented at 58th Annual Meeting of the Society-for-Psychophysiological-Research, 3-7 October 2018, Quebec City, Canada. Psychophysiology, 55(1), S112-S113, Article ID 4-005.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is auditory distraction by changing and deviant sounds underpinned by the same mechanism?: Evidence from pupillometry
2018 (English)In: Psychophysiology, ISSN 0048-5772, E-ISSN 1469-8986, Vol. 55, no 1, p. S112-S113, article id 4-005Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Auditory Distraction; Pupillometry; Attention Capture
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29067 (URN)000453539300453 ()
Conference
58th Annual Meeting of the Society-for-Psychophysiological-Research, 3-7 October 2018, Quebec City, Canada
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Threadgold, E., Marsh, J. E. & Ball, L. J. (2018). Normative data for 84 UK English rebus puzzles. Frontiers in Psychology, 9, Article ID 2513.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Normative data for 84 UK English rebus puzzles
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 9, article id 2513Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent investigations have established the value of using rebus puzzles in studying the insight and analytic processes that underpin problem solving. The current study sought to validate a pool of 84 rebus puzzles in terms of their solution rates, solution times, error rates, solution confidence, self-reported solution strategies, and solution phrase familiarity. All of the puzzles relate to commonplace English sayings and phrases in the United Kingdom. Eighty-four rebus puzzles were selected from a larger stimulus set of 168 such puzzles and were categorized into six types in relation to the similarity of their structures. The 84 selected problems were thence divided into two sets of 42 items (Set A and Set B), with rebus structure evenly balanced between each set. Participants (N = 170; 85 for Set A and 85 for Set B) were given 30 s to solve each item, subsequently indicating their confidence in their solution and self-reporting the process used to solve the problem (analysis or insight), followed by the provision of ratings of the familiarity of the solution phrases. The resulting normative data yield solution rates, error rates, solution times, confidence ratings, self-reported strategies and familiarity ratings for 84 rebus puzzles, providing valuable information for the selection and matching of problems in future research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
Insight, Norming, Problem solving, Rebus, Test validation
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29064 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2018.02513 (DOI)000453335700001 ()2-s2.0-85058383172 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
Marsh, J., Yang, J., Qualter, P., Richardson, C., Perham, N., Vachon, F. & Hughes, R. W. (2018). Post-Categorical Auditory Distraction in Serial Short-Term Memory: Insights from Increased Task-Load and Task-Type. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory and Cognition, 44(6), 882-897
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Post-Categorical Auditory Distraction in Serial Short-Term Memory: Insights from Increased Task-Load and Task-Type
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory and Cognition, ISSN 0278-7393, E-ISSN 1939-1285, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 882-897Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Task-irrelevant speech impairs short-term serial recall appreciably. On the interference-by-process account, the processing of physical (i.e., precategorical) changes in speech yields order cues that conflict with the serial-ordering process deployed to perform the serial recall task. In this view, the postcategorical properties (e.g., phonology, meaning) of speech play no role. The present study reassessed the implications of recent demonstrations of auditory postcategorical distraction in serial recall that have been taken as support for an alternative, attentional-diversion, account of the irrelevant speech effect. Focusing on the disruptive effect of emotionally valent compared with neutral words on serial recall, we show that the distracter-valence effect is eliminated under conditions—high task-encoding load—thought to shield against attentional diversion whereas the general effect of speech (neutral words compared with quiet) remains unaffected (Experiment 1). Furthermore, the distracter-valence effect generalizes to a task that does not require the processing of serial order—the missing-item task—whereas the effect of speech per se is attenuated in this task (Experiment 2). We conclude that postcategorical auditory distraction phenomena in serial short-term memory (STM) are incidental: they are observable in such a setting but, unlike the acoustically driven irrelevant speech effect, are not integral to it. As such, the findings support a duplex-mechanism account over a unitary view of auditory distraction.

Keywords
irrelevant speech, serial STM, serial recall, auditory distraction, emotional valence
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-24846 (URN)10.1037/xlm0000492 (DOI)000433984000003 ()29389192 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85041192033 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-01116
Available from: 2017-08-16 Created: 2017-08-16 Last updated: 2018-06-25Bibliographically approved
Richter, H., Forsman, M., Elcadi, G. H., Brautaset, R., Marsh, J. E. & Zetterberg, C. (2018). Prefrontal cortex activity evoked by convergence load under conflicting stimulus-to-accommodation and stimulus-to-vergence eye-movements measured by NIRS: Prefrontal cortex oxygenation and visual fatigue. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 12, Article ID 298.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prefrontal cortex activity evoked by convergence load under conflicting stimulus-to-accommodation and stimulus-to-vergence eye-movements measured by NIRS: Prefrontal cortex oxygenation and visual fatigue
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5161, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 12, article id 298Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To extend our knowledge of the functional linkages between visual fatigueand regional cerebral prefrontal cortex (PFC) oxygenation, we measured time related hemodynamic changes over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) duringconvergence load under conflicting stimulus-to-accommodation and stimulus-tovergence eye movements with and without concurrent mental load.

Methods: Twenty healthy participants with a median age of 28 years (range:18–44 years) fixated upon a vertical bar presented separately to the left andright eyes, using polarized filters, during four counterbalanced 10-min periods:(i) no accommodation/vergence conflict (Control, Ctrl); (ii) added convergenceload and accommodation/vergence conflict (Conv); (iii) added cognitive load only(Cog) and; (iv) a combination of added cognitive and convergence load andaccommodation/vergence conflict (Cc). Viewing distance was 65 cm. Non-invasivemeasurements of hemodynamic activity over the dlPFC were quantified by functionalnear-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). During the two-convergence load conditions, thehorizontal disparity of the two bars varied dynamically from no disparity to a disparityset 20% below the individual threshold for diplopia. Cognitive load was induced by then-back-2 test which required the subject to memorize and recall the changing colorsof the horizontal bars and decide when a given color was the same as that occurring two colors previously. fNIRS data were averaged over 10-s windows centered at 0, 2,4, 6, 8, and 10 min of each task, subtracted from a 20-s baseline window immediatelypreceding the visual task, and then represented as changes in oxygenated hemoglobin(ΔHbO2); deoxygenated hemoglobin (ΔHHb) and total hemoglobin (ΔtHb).

Results: Linear mixed model analyses showed that hemodynamic activity wassystematically influenced by time (p < 0.001). The group-averaged time-related levelof change across the viewing conditions did not differ when compared with one another(p > 0.05). Larger convergence eye-movement responses under conflicting stimulus-to accommodation,and stimulus-to-vergence over time, increased ΔHbO2 and ΔtHb onlyin condition Cc and after 8 min of task time (p < 0.10 for min-6 and min-8: p < 0.05 for min-10).

Discussion: Collectively, our data suggest that HbO2, HHb, and tHb, recorded over the dlPFC with fNIRS, can be used to assay the degree to which supervisory oculomotorcontrol processes are activated during visually deficient near work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
Visual fatigue, Accommodation, Compensatory effort, Convergence, Disparity, Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS), Time series analysis, Visual ergonomics
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25766 (URN)10.3389/fnhum.2018.00298 (DOI)000440216100002 ()30104967 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054772976 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761Swedish Research Council, 2015-01116
Note

Corrigendum: Prefrontal Cortex Oxygenation Evoked by Convergence Load Under Conflicting Stimulus-to-Accommodation and Stimulus-to-Vergence Eye-Movements Measured by NIRS DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2018.00384.

ScopusId: 2-s2.0-85054817559

ISI-id: 000445088000001

Available from: 2017-12-08 Created: 2017-12-08 Last updated: 2019-03-12Bibliographically approved
Ball, L. J., Threadgold, E., Marsh, J. E. & Christensen, B. T. (2018). The effects of stimulus complexity and conceptual fluency on aesthetic judgments of abstract art: Evidence for a default–interventionist account. Metaphor and Symbol, 33(3), 235-252
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of stimulus complexity and conceptual fluency on aesthetic judgments of abstract art: Evidence for a default–interventionist account
2018 (English)In: Metaphor and Symbol, ISSN 1092-6488, E-ISSN 1532-7868, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 235-252Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We report an experiment investigating how stimulus complexity and conceptual fluency (i.e., the ease of deriving meaning) influence aesthetic liking judgments for abstract artworks. We presented participants with paintings at two levels of complexity (high vs. low) and five levels of conceptual fluency (determined from a prior norming study) and requested separate ratings of beauty and creativity. Our predictions were derived from the PIA Model (Pleasure-Interest Model of Aesthetic Liking), which views aesthetic preferences as being formed by two, distinct fluency-based processes: an initial, automatic, stimulus-driven, default process and a subsequent, perceiver-driven deliberative process. A key trigger for deliberative processing is assumed to be disfluency at the default stage, as caused by factors such as visual complexity. We predicted that complexity and conceptual fluency would interact in determining aesthetic liking, with people preferring complex stimuli, but only when these are relatively easy to process conceptually. Our results supported this prediction for beauty judgments, although creativity judgments showed a curiously uniform profile. Nevertheless, the predictive capacity of the PIA Model in relation to beauty judgments attests to the explanatory strength of this default?interventionist theory of aesthetic liking. We conclude by noting important parallels between the PIA Model and the Revised Optimal Innovation Hypothesis, which likewise has broad reach in explaining how defaultness and non-defaultness affect pleasure across a range of linguistic and pictorial stimuli.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27842 (URN)10.1080/10926488.2018.1481255 (DOI)000440605900008 ()2-s2.0-85050965818 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-05 Created: 2018-09-05 Last updated: 2018-09-05Bibliographically approved
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