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Marsh, John E.
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 56) Show all publications
Marsh, J. E., Vachon, F., Sörqvist, P., Marsja, E., Röer, J., Richardson, B. & Ljungberg, J. (2023). Irrelevant changing-state vibrotactile stimuli disrupt verbal serial recall: Implications for theories of interference in short-term memory. Journal of Cognitive Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Irrelevant changing-state vibrotactile stimuli disrupt verbal serial recall: Implications for theories of interference in short-term memory
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Cognitive Psychology, ISSN 2044-5911, E-ISSN 2044-592XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

What causes interference in short-term memory? We report the novel finding that immediate memory for visually-presented verbal items is sensitive to disruption from task-irrelevant vibrotactile stimuli. Specifically, short-term memory for a visual sequence is disrupted by a concurrently presented sequence of vibrations, but only when the vibrotactile sequence entails change (when the sequence “jumps” between the two hands). The impact on visual-verbal serial recall was similar in magnitude to that for auditory stimuli (Experiment 1). Performance of the missing item task, requiring recall of item-identity rather than item-order, was unaffected by changing-state vibrotactile stimuli (Experiment 2), as with changing-state auditory stimuli. Moreover, the predictability of the changing-state sequence did not modulate the magnitude of the effect, arguing against an attention-capture conceptualisation (Experiment 3). Results support the view that interference in short-term memory is produced by conflict between incompatible, amodal serial-ordering processes (interference-by-process) rather than interference between similar representational codes (interference-by-content).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
auditory distraction; cross-modal interference; modality; Short-term memory; vibrotactile distraction
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
no Strategic Research Area (SFO)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-41132 (URN)10.1080/20445911.2023.2198065 (DOI)000970460400001 ()2-s2.0-85152445126 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2211-0505Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2014.0205Swedish Research Council, 2015-01116
Available from: 2023-03-06 Created: 2023-03-06 Last updated: 2023-05-22Bibliographically approved
Andersson, H., Holmgren, M., Sörqvist, P., Threadgold, E., Beaman, P., Ball, L. & Marsh, J. E. (2023). The Negative Footprint Illusion is Exacerbated by the Numerosity of Environment-Friendly Additions: Unveiling the Underpinning Mechanisms. Journal of Cognitive Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Negative Footprint Illusion is Exacerbated by the Numerosity of Environment-Friendly Additions: Unveiling the Underpinning Mechanisms
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Cognitive Psychology, ISSN 2044-5911, E-ISSN 2044-592XArticle in journal (Refereed) Accepted
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Sustainable Urban Development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-43413 (URN)
Available from: 2023-12-08 Created: 2023-12-08 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
Sörqvist, P., Volna, I., Zhao, J. & Marsh, J. E. (2022). Irregular stimulus distribution increases the negative footprint illusion. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 63(5), 530-535
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Irregular stimulus distribution increases the negative footprint illusion
2022 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 63, no 5, p. 530-535Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As a climate change mitigation strategy, environmentally certified 'green' buildings with low carbon footprints are becoming more prevalent in the world. An interesting psychological question is how people perceive the carbon footprint of these buildings given their spatial distributions in a given community. Here we examine whether regular distribution (i.e., buildings organized in a block) or irregular distribution (i.e., buildings randomly distributed) influences people's perception of the carbon footprint of the communities. We first replicated the negative footprint illusion, the tendency to estimate a lower carbon footprint of a combined group of environmentally certified green buildings and ordinary conventional buildings, than the carbon footprint of the conventional buildings alone. Importantly, we found that irregular distribution of the buildings increased the magnitude of the negative footprint illusion. Potential applied implications for urban planning of green buildings are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2022
Keywords
Negative footprint illusion; perceived numerosity; spatial distribution
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Sustainable Urban Development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-38442 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12829 (DOI)000854979500013 ()35607836 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85130605424 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-04-21 Created: 2022-04-21 Last updated: 2022-09-29Bibliographically approved
Elliott, E. M., Marsh, J. E., Zeringue, J. & McGill, C. I. (2020). Are individual differences in auditory processing related to auditory distraction by irrelevant sound?: A replication study. Memory & Cognition, 48(1), 145-157
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are individual differences in auditory processing related to auditory distraction by irrelevant sound?: A replication study
2020 (English)In: Memory & Cognition, ISSN 0090-502X, E-ISSN 1532-5946, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 145-157Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Irrelevant sounds can be very distracting, especially when trying to recall information according to its serial order. The irrelevant sound effect (ISE) has been studied in the literature for more than 40 years, yet many questions remain. One goal that has received little attention involves the discernment of a predictive factor, or individual difference characteristic, that would help to determine the size of the ISE. The current experiments were designed to replicate and extend prior work by Macken, Phelps, and Jones (Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 16, 139-144, 2009), who demonstrated a significant predictive relationship between the size of the ISE and a type of auditory processing called global pattern matching. The authors also found a relationship between auditory processing involving deliberate recoding of sounds and serial order recall performance in silence. Across two experiments, this dissociation was not replicated. Additionally, the two types of auditory processing were not significantly correlated with each other. The lack of a clear pattern of findings replicating the Macken et al. (Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 16, 139-144, 2009) study raises several questions regarding the need for future research on the characteristics of these auditory processing tasks, and the stability of the measurement of the ISE itself.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Psychonomic Society, 2020
Keywords
Auditory distraction, Individual differences, Replication, Serial recall
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
no Strategic Research Area (SFO)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30572 (URN)10.3758/s13421-019-00968-8 (DOI)000511938900011 ()31363999 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85078684170 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-23 Created: 2019-08-23 Last updated: 2020-11-23Bibliographically approved
Marsh, J. E., Campbell, T. A., Vachon, F., Taylor, P. J. & Hughes, R. W. (2020). How the deployment of visual attention modulates auditory distraction. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, 82(1), 350-362
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How the deployment of visual attention modulates auditory distraction
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2020 (English)In: Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, ISSN 1943-3921, E-ISSN 1943-393X, Vol. 82, no 1, p. 350-362Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Classically, attentional selectivity has been conceptualized as a passive by-product of capacity-limits on stimulus-processing. Here, we examine the role of more active cognitive control processes in attentional selectivity, focusing on how distraction from task-irrelevant sound is modulated by levels of task-engagement in a visually-presented short-term memory task. Task-engagement was varied by manipulating the load involved in the encoding of the (visually-presented) to-be-remembered items. Using a list of Navon letters (where a large letter is composed of smaller, different-identity, letters), participants were oriented to attend and serially recall the list of large letters (low encoding-load) or to attend and serially recall the list of small letters (high encoding-load). Attentional capture by a single deviant noise burst within a task-irrelevant tone sequence (the deviation effect) was eliminated under high encoding-load (Experiment 1). However, distraction from a continuously changing sequence of tones (the changing-state effect) was immune to the influence of load (Experiment 2). This dissociation in the amenability of the deviation effect and the changing-state effect to cognitive control supports a duplex- over a unitary-mechanism account of auditory distraction in which the deviation effect is due to attentional capture while the changing-state effect reflects direct interference between the processing of the sound and processes involved in the focal task. That the changing-state effect survives high encoding-load also goes against an alternative explanation of the attenuation of the deviation effect under high load in terms of the depletion of a limited perceptual resource that would result in diminished auditory processing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Selective attention, cognitive control, auditory distraction, attentional capture, interference-by-process
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
no Strategic Research Area (SFO)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29820 (URN)10.3758/s13414-019-01800-w (DOI)000511569600023 ()31290133 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85068928972 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-01116Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-06-12 Created: 2019-06-12 Last updated: 2022-09-09Bibliographically approved
Sörqvist, P., Colding, J. & Marsh, J. E. (2020). Psychological obstacles to the efficacy of environmental footprint tools. Environmental Research Letters, 15(9), Article ID 091001.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychological obstacles to the efficacy of environmental footprint tools
2020 (English)In: Environmental Research Letters, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 15, no 9, article id 091001Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Physics (IOP), 2020
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Intelligent Industry; Sustainable Urban Development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-32351 (URN)10.1088/1748-9326/ab9968 (DOI)000565479200001 ()2-s2.0-85090875818 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-05-29 Created: 2020-05-29 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Meng, Z., Lan, Z., Yan, G., Marsh, J. E. & Liversedge, S. P. (2020). Task demands modulate the effects of speech on text processing. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory and Cognition, 46(10), 1892-1905
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Task demands modulate the effects of speech on text processing
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory and Cognition, ISSN 0278-7393, E-ISSN 1939-1285, Vol. 46, no 10, p. 1892-1905Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Task-irrelevant background sound can disrupt performance of visually based cognitive tasks. The cross-modal breakdown of attentional selectivity in the context of reading was addressed using analyses of eye movements. Moreover, the study addressed whether task-sensitivity to distraction via background speech on reading was modulated by the cognitive demands of the focal task. Two randomly-assigned groups of native Chinese participants read the same set of Chinese experimental sentences while being exposed to meaningful speech, meaningless (foreign) speech, or silence. For one group, participants were instructed to judge whether the sentences made sense (i.e., semantic acceptability task); for another, participants were instructed to detect whether the sentences contained a noncharacter (i.e., noncharacter detection task). Results showed no significant effect across sound conditions for the noncharacter detection task. For the semantic acceptability task, however, there was a substantial disruptive effect of the meaningfulness of the speech. Compared with reading with meaningless speech or reading in silence, the meaningful speech increased numbers of fixations, regressions, regression path, and total reading times. These results suggest that the disruption of reading by background speech is jointly dependent on the nature of the speech and the task process deployed, thereby favoring an Interference-by-Process account over Interference-by-Content and Attentional Diversion accounts of distraction to reading by background sound.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association, 2020
Keywords
eye-movements, process-oriented, reading, auditory distraction, Auditory Stimulation, Meaningfulness, Oral Communication, Sentences, Distraction, Noise Effects, Silence
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-34140 (URN)10.1037/xlm0000861 (DOI)000580444800007 ()32437187 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85087086151 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-10-16 Created: 2020-10-16 Last updated: 2023-09-18Bibliographically approved
Vachon, F., Marsh, J. E. & Labonte, K. (2020). The Automaticity of Semantic Processing Revisited: Auditory Distraction by a Categorical Deviation. Journal of experimental psychology. General, 149(7), 1360-1397
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Automaticity of Semantic Processing Revisited: Auditory Distraction by a Categorical Deviation
2020 (English)In: Journal of experimental psychology. General, ISSN 0096-3445, E-ISSN 1939-2222, Vol. 149, no 7, p. 1360-1397Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Automatic information processing has been and still is a debated topic. Traditionally, automatic processes are deemed to take place autonomously and independently of top-down cognitive control. For decades, the literature on reading has brought to the fore empirical phenomena such as Stroop and semantic priming effects that provide support for the assumption that semantic information can be accessed automatically. More recently, there has been growing evidence that semantic processing is in fact susceptible to higher-level cognitive influences, suggesting that this form of processing is instead conditionally automatic. The purpose of the present study was to revisit this debate using a novel approach: The automatic access to the meaning of irrelevant auditory stimuli was tested through the assessment of their distractive power. More specifically, we aimed to examine whether a categorical change in the content of to-be-ignored auditory sequences composed of speech items that are personally nonsignificant to participants (e.g.. a digit among letters) can disrupt an unrelated visual focal task. In seven experiments. we assessed this categorical deviation effect and its functional properties. We established that distraction by categorical deviation is noncontingent on the activated task set and appears resistant to top-down control manipulations. By suggesting not only that the semantic content of the irrelevant sound can be extracted preattentively, but also that such semantic activation is ineluctable during auditory distraction, these findings shed new light on the automatic nature of semantic processing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association, 2020
Keywords
attentional capture, automaticity, deviation effect, irrelevant sound, semantic processing
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-32884 (URN)10.1037/xge0000714 (DOI)000537798700009 ()31750710 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-06-22 Created: 2020-06-22 Last updated: 2020-06-22Bibliographically approved
Hughes, R. W. & Marsh, J. E. (2020). When is forewarned forearmed?: Predicting auditory distraction in short-term memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory and Cognition, 46(3), 427-442
Open this publication in new window or tab >>When is forewarned forearmed?: Predicting auditory distraction in short-term memory
2020 (English)In: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory and Cognition, ISSN 0278-7393, E-ISSN 1939-1285, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 427-442Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Two experiments critically examined a predictive-coding based account of the vulnerability of short-term memory to auditory distraction, particularly the disruptive effect of changing-state sound on verbal serial recall. Experiment 1 showed that providing participants with the opportunity to predict the contents of an imminent spoken distractor sentence via a forewarning reduced its particularly disruptive effect but only to the same level of disruption as that produced by ‘simpler’ changing-state sequences (a sequence of letter-names). Moreover, a post-categorically unpredictable changing-state sequence (e.g., “F, B, H, E …”) was no more disruptive than a post-categorically predictable sequence (“A, B, C, D …”). Experiment 2 showed that a sentence distractor was disruptive regardless of whether participants reported adopting a serial rehearsal strategy to perform the focal task (in this case, a missing-item task) whereas, critically, the disruptive effect of simpler changing-state sequences was only found in participants who reported using a serial rehearsal strategy. Moreover, when serial rehearsal was not used to perform the focal task, the disruptive effect of sentences was completely abolished by a forewarning. These results indicate that predictability plays no role in the classical changing-state irrelevant sound effect and that foreknowledge selectively attenuates a functionally distinct stimulus-specific attentional-diversion effect. As such, the results are at odds with a unitary, attentional, account of auditory distraction in short-term memory and instead strongly support a duplex-mechanism account.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association (APA), 2020
Keywords
Auditory distraction, serial recall, predictive coding, short-term memory, interference-by-process, duplex-mechanism account
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
no Strategic Research Area (SFO)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29722 (URN)10.1037/xlm0000736 (DOI)000516711500003 ()31180705 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-06-09 Created: 2019-06-09 Last updated: 2023-09-18Bibliographically approved
Threadgold, E., Marsh, J. E., McLatchie, N. & Ball, L. J. (2019). Background music stints creativity: evidence from compound remote associate tasks. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 33(5), 873-888
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Background music stints creativity: evidence from compound remote associate tasks
2019 (English)In: Applied Cognitive Psychology, ISSN 0888-4080, E-ISSN 1099-0720, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 873-888Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Summary Background music has been claimed to enhance people's creativity. In three experiments, we investigated the impact of background music on performance of Compound Remote Associate Tasks (CRATs), which are widely thought to tap creativity. Background music with foreign (unfamiliar) lyrics (Experiment 1), instrumental music without lyrics (Experiment 2), and music with familiar lyrics (Experiment 3) all significantly impaired CRAT performance in comparison with quiet background conditions. Furthermore, Experiment 3 demonstrated that background music impaired CRAT performance regardless of whether the music induced a positive mood or whether participants typically studied in the presence of music. The findings challenge the view that background music enhances creativity and are discussed in terms of an auditory distraction account (interference-by-process) and the processing disfluency account.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
Compound Remote Associate Tasks, creativity, distraction, insight, music
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
no Strategic Research Area (SFO)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30207 (URN)10.1002/acp.3532 (DOI)000483705900012 ()2-s2.0-85069492825 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-06-25 Created: 2019-06-25 Last updated: 2020-11-23Bibliographically approved
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