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Marsh, John E.
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Publications (10 of 49) Show all publications
Elliott, E. M., Marsh, J. E., Zeringue, J. & McGill, C. I. (2019). Are individual differences in auditory processing related to auditory distraction by irrelevant sound?: A replication study. Paper presented at United States. Memory & Cognition
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are individual differences in auditory processing related to auditory distraction by irrelevant sound?: A replication study
2019 (English)In: Memory & Cognition, ISSN 0090-502X, E-ISSN 1532-5946Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Irrelevant sounds can be very distracting, especially when trying to recall information according to its serial order. The irrelevant sound effect (ISE) has been studied in the literature for more than 40 years, yet many questions remain. One goal that has received little attention involves the discernment of a predictive factor, or individual difference characteristic, that would help to determine the size of the ISE. The current experiments were designed to replicate and extend prior work by Macken, Phelps, and Jones (Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 16, 139-144, 2009), who demonstrated a significant predictive relationship between the size of the ISE and a type of auditory processing called global pattern matching. The authors also found a relationship between auditory processing involving deliberate recoding of sounds and serial order recall performance in silence. Across two experiments, this dissociation was not replicated. Additionally, the two types of auditory processing were not significantly correlated with each other. The lack of a clear pattern of findings replicating the Macken et al. (Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 16, 139-144, 2009) study raises several questions regarding the need for future research on the characteristics of these auditory processing tasks, and the stability of the measurement of the ISE itself.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Psychonomic Society, 2019
Keywords
Auditory distraction, Individual differences, Replication, Serial recall
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30572 (URN)10.3758/s13421-019-00968-8 (DOI)31363999 (PubMedID)
Conference
United States
Available from: 2019-08-23 Created: 2019-08-23 Last updated: 2019-08-23Bibliographically approved
Threadgold, E., Marsh, J. E., McLatchie, N. & Ball, L. J. (2019). Background music stints creativity: evidence from compound remote associate tasks. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 33(5), 873-888
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Background music stints creativity: evidence from compound remote associate tasks
2019 (English)In: Applied Cognitive Psychology, ISSN 0888-4080, E-ISSN 1099-0720, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 873-888Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Summary Background music has been claimed to enhance people's creativity. In three experiments, we investigated the impact of background music on performance of Compound Remote Associate Tasks (CRATs), which are widely thought to tap creativity. Background music with foreign (unfamiliar) lyrics (Experiment 1), instrumental music without lyrics (Experiment 2), and music with familiar lyrics (Experiment 3) all significantly impaired CRAT performance in comparison with quiet background conditions. Furthermore, Experiment 3 demonstrated that background music impaired CRAT performance regardless of whether the music induced a positive mood or whether participants typically studied in the presence of music. The findings challenge the view that background music enhances creativity and are discussed in terms of an auditory distraction account (interference-by-process) and the processing disfluency account.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
Compound Remote Associate Tasks, creativity, distraction, insight, music
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30207 (URN)10.1002/acp.3532 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-06-25 Created: 2019-06-25 Last updated: 2019-10-07Bibliographically approved
Marsja, E., Marsh, J. E., Hansson, P. & Neely, G. (2019). Examining the Role of Spatial Changes in Bimodal and Uni-Modal To-Be-Ignored Stimuli and How They Affect Short-Term Memory Processes. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, Article ID 299.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Examining the Role of Spatial Changes in Bimodal and Uni-Modal To-Be-Ignored Stimuli and How They Affect Short-Term Memory Processes
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 299Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examines the potential vulnerability of short-term memory processes to distraction by spatial changes within to-be-ignored bimodal, vibratory, and auditory stimuli. Participants were asked to recall sequences of serially presented digits or locations of dots while being exposed to to-be-ignored stimuli. On unexpected occasions, the bimodal to-be-ignored sequence, vibratory to-be-ignored sequence, or auditory to-be-ignored sequence changed their spatial origin from one side of the body (e.g., ear and arm, arm only, ear only) to the other. It was expected that the bimodal stimuli would make the spatial change more salient compared to that of the uni-modal stimuli and that this, in turn, would yield an increase in distraction of serial short-term memory in both the verbal and spatial domains. Our results support this assumption as a disruptive effect of the spatial deviant was only observed when presented within the bimodal to-be-ignored sequence: uni-modal to-be-ignored sequences, whether vibratory: or auditory, had no impact on either verbal or spatial short-term memory. Implications for models of attention capture and the potential special attention capturing role of bimodal stimuli are discussed.

Keywords
attention capture; audition; bimodal; distraction; multisensory; serial recall; short-term memory; vibration
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29726 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00299 (DOI)000460833300001 ()30914983 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065149781 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2011-1782
Available from: 2019-06-09 Created: 2019-06-09 Last updated: 2019-08-08Bibliographically approved
Marsh, J. E., Hansson, P., Eriksson Sörman, D. & Körning Ljungberg, J. (2019). Executive Processes Underpin the Bilingual Advantage on Phonemic Fluency: Evidence from Analyses of Switching and Clustering. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, Article ID 1355.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Executive Processes Underpin the Bilingual Advantage on Phonemic Fluency: Evidence from Analyses of Switching and Clustering
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 1355Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bilinguals often show a disadvantage in lexical access on verbal fluency tasks wherein the criteria require the production of words from semantic categories. However, the pattern is more heterogeneous for letter (phonemic) fluency wherein the task is to produce words beginning with a given letter. Here, bilinguals often outperform monolinguals. One explanation for this is that phonemic fluency, as compared with semantic fluency, is more greatly underpinned by executive processes and that bilinguals exhibit better performance on phonemic fluency due to better executive functions. In this study, we re-analyzed phonemic fluency data from the Betula study, scoring outputs according to two measures that purportedly reflect executive processes: clustering and switching. Consistent with the notion that bilinguals have superior executive processes and that these can be used to offset a bilingual disadvantage in verbal fluency, bilinguals (35-65 years at baseline) demonstrated greater switching and clustering throughout the 15-year study period.

Keywords
aging; bilingualism; executive function; longitudinal study; phonemic fluency
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29724 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01355 (DOI)000471303800001 ()31244740 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85068690283 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, 1988-0082:17Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, J2001-0682Swedish Research Council, 421-2011-1782Swedish Research Council, 345-2003-3883Swedish Research Council, 315-2004-6977Swedish Research Council, 2015-01116Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2211-0505Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205
Note

Swedish Council for Planning and Coordination of Research (FRN) Grant no:s: D1988-0092, D1989-0115, D1990-0074, D1991-0258, D1992-0143, D1997-0756, D1997-1841, D1999-0739, B1999-474 

Swedish Council for Research in the Humanities and Social Sciences Grant no. F377/1988-2000 

Swedish Council for Social Research Grant no. 1988-1990: 88-0082 311/1991-2000 

Available from: 2019-06-09 Created: 2019-06-09 Last updated: 2019-08-23Bibliographically approved
Marsh, J. E., Campbell, T. A., Vachon, F., Taylor, P. J. & Hughes, R. W. (2019). How the deployment of visual attention modulates auditory distraction. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How the deployment of visual attention modulates auditory distraction
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2019 (English)In: Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, ISSN 1943-3921, E-ISSN 1943-393XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Classically, attentional selectivity has been conceptualized as a passive by-product of capacity-limits on stimulus-processing. Here, we examine the role of more active cognitive control processes in attentional selectivity, focusing on how distraction from task-irrelevant sound is modulated by levels of task-engagement in a visually-presented short-term memory task. Task-engagement was varied by manipulating the load involved in the encoding of the (visually-presented) to-be-remembered items. Using a list of Navon letters (where a large letter is composed of smaller, different-identity, letters), participants were oriented to attend and serially recall the list of large letters (low encoding-load) or to attend and serially recall the list of small letters (high encoding-load). Attentional capture by a single deviant noise burst within a task-irrelevant tone sequence (the deviation effect) was eliminated under high encoding-load (Experiment 1). However, distraction from a continuously changing sequence of tones (the changing-state effect) was immune to the influence of load (Experiment 2). This dissociation in the amenability of the deviation effect and the changing-state effect to cognitive control supports a duplex- over a unitary-mechanism account of auditory distraction in which the deviation effect is due to attentional capture while the changing-state effect reflects direct interference between the processing of the sound and processes involved in the focal task. That the changing-state effect survives high encoding-load also goes against an alternative explanation of the attenuation of the deviation effect under high load in terms of the depletion of a limited perceptual resource that would result in diminished auditory processing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Selective attention, cognitive control, auditory distraction, attentional capture, interference-by-process
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29820 (URN)10.3758/s13414-019-01800-w (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-01116Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-06-12 Created: 2019-06-12 Last updated: 2019-10-07Bibliographically approved
Marois, A., Marsh, J. E. & Vachon, F. (2019). Is auditory distraction by changing-state and deviant sounds underpinned by the same mechanism?: Evidence from pupillometry. Biological Psychology, 141, 64-74
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is auditory distraction by changing-state and deviant sounds underpinned by the same mechanism?: Evidence from pupillometry
2019 (English)In: Biological Psychology, ISSN 0301-0511, E-ISSN 1873-6246, Vol. 141, p. 64-74Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The mere presence of task-irrelevant auditory stimuli is known to interfere with cognitive functioning. Disruption can be caused by changing auditory distractors (the changing-state effect) or by a sound that deviates from the auditory background (the deviation effect). The unitary account of auditory distraction explains both phenomena in terms of attentional capture whereas the duplex-mechanism account posits that they reflect two fundamentally different forms of distraction in which only the deviation effect is caused by attentional capture. To test these predictions, we exploited a physiological index of attention orienting: the pupillary dilation response (PDR). Participants performed visual serial recall while ignoring sequences of spoken letters. These sequences either comprised repeated or changing letters, and one letter could sometimes be replaced by pink noise (the deviant). Recall was poorer in both changing-state and deviant trials. Interestingly, the PDR was elicited by deviant sounds but not changing-state sounds, while a tonic increase in pupil size was found throughout changing-state trials. This physiological dissociation of the changing-state and the deviation effects suggests they are subtended by distinct mechanisms thereby procuring support for the duplex-mechanism account over the unitary account. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Attention capture, Auditory distraction, Interference-by-process, Irrelevant sound, Pupillometry, adult, Article, auditory stimulation, auditory system function, behavior, cognition, female, human, human experiment, male, noise, normal human, priority journal, pupil, recall, sound, steady state, task performance, attention, hearing, masking, orientation, physiology, procedures, psychology, young adult, Acoustic Stimulation, Auditory Perception, Humans, Mental Recall, Perceptual Masking
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30512 (URN)10.1016/j.biopsycho.2019.01.002 (DOI)000456014300008 ()30633950 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059804020 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-01116
Available from: 2019-08-16 Created: 2019-08-16 Last updated: 2019-09-04Bibliographically approved
Campbell, T. A. & Marsh, J. E. (2019). On corticopetal-corticofugal loops of the new early filter: from cell assemblies to the rostral brainstem. NeuroReport, 30(3), 202-206
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On corticopetal-corticofugal loops of the new early filter: from cell assemblies to the rostral brainstem
2019 (English)In: NeuroReport, ISSN 0959-4965, E-ISSN 1473-558X, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 202-206Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NLM (Medline), 2019
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29374 (URN)10.1097/WNR.0000000000001184 (DOI)000459194800010 ()30702551 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060958439 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-01116
Available from: 2019-03-12 Created: 2019-03-12 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved
Sörqvist, P. & Marsh, J. E. (Eds.). (2019). The Cognitive Psychology of Climate Change. Frontiers Media S.A.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Cognitive Psychology of Climate Change
2019 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Climate change is one of society’s great challenges. The scientific community agrees that human activity is to a large degree responsible for these changes and efforts to promote more sustainable behaviors and lifestyles often backfire. People travel for longer distances when driving a vehicle that uses a ‘sustainable’ energy source; they purchase ‘organic’ food as a means to be environmentally friendly without necessarily reducing other means of consumption; and those who deliberately change their behavior to be more environmentally friendly in one area often start behaving environmentally irresponsibly in another. Environmentally harmful behavior and decision making often have their roots in cognitive biases and cognitive inabilities to properly understand climate change issues, to understand the effects of one's own behavior on the environment, and other means by which thinking and reasoning about climate change issues are biased.

This Research Topic addresses the cognitive challenges of climate change: how people perceive, understand and solve environmental problems. It covers studies on individual and collective judgment and decision making, heuristics and biases, reasoning and thinking, perception and problem solving in relation to climate change and sustainability-related problems. It also covers, but is not limited to, the cognitive psychology of the CO2 accumulation problem, biases in judgments of environmental impact of objects and actions, confirmation biases in thinking and reasoning about climate change issues, and ways in which people's thinking about and understanding of climate change problems can be improved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Series
Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-8714
Keywords
Perception, Judgement, Cognition, Climate Change, Environment
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30684 (URN)10.3389/978-2-88963-013-4 (DOI)9782889630134 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-09-24 Created: 2019-09-24 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Hughes, R. W. & Marsh, J. E. (2019). When is forewarned forearmed?: Predicting auditory distraction in short-term memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory and Cognition
Open this publication in new window or tab >>When is forewarned forearmed?: Predicting auditory distraction in short-term memory
2019 (English)In: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory and Cognition, ISSN 0278-7393, E-ISSN 1939-1285Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

Two experiments critically examined a predictive-coding based account of the vulnerability of short-term memory to auditory distraction, particularly the disruptive effect of changing-state sound on verbal serial recall. Experiment 1 showed that providing participants with the opportunity to predict the contents of an imminent spoken distractor sentence via a forewarning reduced its particularly disruptive effect but only to the same level of disruption as that produced by ‘simpler’ changing-state sequences (a sequence of letter-names). Moreover, a post-categorically unpredictable changing-state sequence (e.g., “F, B, H, E …”) was no more disruptive than a post-categorically predictable sequence (“A, B, C, D …”). Experiment 2 showed that a sentence distractor was disruptive regardless of whether participants reported adopting a serial rehearsal strategy to perform the focal task (in this case, a missing-item task) whereas, critically, the disruptive effect of simpler changing-state sequences was only found in participants who reported using a serial rehearsal strategy. Moreover, when serial rehearsal was not used to perform the focal task, the disruptive effect of sentences was completely abolished by a forewarning. These results indicate that predictability plays no role in the classical changing-state irrelevant sound effect and that foreknowledge selectively attenuates a functionally distinct stimulus-specific attentional-diversion effect. As such, the results are at odds with a unitary, attentional, account of auditory distraction in short-term memory and instead strongly support a duplex-mechanism account.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association (APA), 2019
Keywords
Auditory distraction, serial recall, predictive coding, short-term memory, interference-by-process, duplex-mechanism account
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29722 (URN)10.1037/xlm0000736 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-06-09 Created: 2019-06-09 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved
Marsh, J. (2018). Can intrinsic and extrinsic metacognitive cues shield against distraction in problem solving?. Journal of cognition, 1(1), Article ID 15.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can intrinsic and extrinsic metacognitive cues shield against distraction in problem solving?
2018 (English)In: Journal of cognition, E-ISSN 2514-4820, Vol. 1, no 1, article id 15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We investigated the capacity for two different forms of metacognitive cue to shield against auditory distraction in problem solving with Compound Remote Associates Tasks (CRATs). Experiment 1 demonstrated that an intrinsic metacognitive cue in the form of processing disfluency (manipulated using an easy-to-read vs. difficult-to-read font) could increase focal task engagement so as to mitigate the detrimental impact of distraction on solution rates for CRATs. Experiment 2 showed that an extrinsic metacognitive cue that took the form of an incentive for good task performance (i.e., 80% or better CRAT solutions) could likewise eliminate the negative impact of distraction on CRAT solution rates. Overall, these findings support the view that both intrinsic and extrinsic metacognitive cues have remarkably similar effects. This suggests that metacognitive cues operate via a common underlying mechanism whereby a participant applies increased focal attention to the primary task so as to ensure more steadfast task engagement that is not so easily diverted by task-irrelevant stimuli.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25728 (URN)10.5334/joc.9 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-12-04 Created: 2017-12-04 Last updated: 2018-06-26Bibliographically approved
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