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Wright, Sandra A. I.ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8895-5631
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 31) Show all publications
Bui, T. T. A., Wright, S. A. I., Falk, A. B., Vanwalleghem, T., Van Hemelrijck, W., Hertog, M. L. .., . . . Davey, M. W. (2019). Botrytis cinerea differentially induces postharvest antioxidant responses in 'Braeburn' and 'Golden Delicious' apple fruit. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 99(13), 5662-5670
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Botrytis cinerea differentially induces postharvest antioxidant responses in 'Braeburn' and 'Golden Delicious' apple fruit
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2019 (English)In: Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, ISSN 0022-5142, E-ISSN 1097-0010, Vol. 99, no 13, p. 5662-5670Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The fruit of two apple cultivars - 'Braeburn', which is susceptible to inoculation with Botrytis cinerea, and the less susceptible cv. 'Golden Delicious' - were investigated with respect to their response to inoculation with B. cinerea. Successful infection by B. cinerea leads to an oxidative burst and perturbation of plant redox homeostasis. To investigate the interaction between apple fruit and B. cinerea, antioxidant metabolism in fruit samples from sun-exposed and shaded sides of different tissue types was measured over time.

RESULTS: The sun-exposed tissue of 'Braeburn' had higher initial levels of total vitamin C in the peel and phenolic compounds in the flesh than 'Golden Delicious', despite its greater susceptibility to gray mold. A substantial antioxidant response was recorded in diseased 'Braeburn' fruit 14 days after inoculation, which involved an elevated superoxide dismutase activity and ascorbate peroxidase activity, a progressive oxidation of total vitamin C, and a decrease in peroxidase activity and phenolic content. Disease development was slower on the sun-exposed sides than on the shaded sides.

CONCLUSION: The two cultivars appeared to utilize different strategies to defend themselves against B. cinerea. 'Golden Delicious' almost entirely escaped infection. Preharvest exposure of apple fruit to high light / temperature stress appears to prepare them to better resist subsequent postharvest attack and disease. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
Botrytis cinerea, Malus × domestica, antioxidant metabolism, postharvest storage
National Category
Food Science Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30531 (URN)10.1002/jsfa.9827 (DOI)000485950200007 ()31150567 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85068644495 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Vinnova, 2014-05046Vinnova, 2014-03890
Available from: 2019-08-20 Created: 2019-08-20 Last updated: 2019-10-11Bibliographically approved
Rönnander, J., Ljunggren, J., Hedenström, E. & Wright, S. A. (2018). Biotransformation of vanillin into vanillyl alcohol by a novel strain of Cystobasidium laryngis isolated from decaying wood. AMB Express, 8(1), Article ID 137.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biotransformation of vanillin into vanillyl alcohol by a novel strain of Cystobasidium laryngis isolated from decaying wood
2018 (English)In: AMB Express, ISSN 2191-0855, E-ISSN 2191-0855, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 137Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vanillin is an aromatic aldehyde found as a component of lignocellulosic material, and in the cured pods of orchidaceae plants. Like other phenolic substances, vanillin has antimicrobial activity and can be extracted from lignin either by a thermo-chemical process or through microbial degradation. Vanillin, can serve as a model monomer in biodegradation studies of lignin. In the present study, a yeast isolated from decaying wood on the Faroe Islands, was identified as Cystobasidium laryngis strain FMYD002, based on internal transcribed spacer sequence analysis. It demonstrated the ability to convert vanillin to vanillyl alcohol, as detected by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography–quadrupole-time-of-flight. Structural analysis of vanillyl alcohol was carried out by using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and 1H NMR spectroscopy, and further verified by synthesis. The reduction of vanillin to vanillyl alcohol has been documented for only a few species of fungi. However, to our knowledge, this biotransformation has not yet been reported for basidiomycetous yeast species, nor for any representative of the subphylum Pucciniomycotina. The biotransformation capability of the present strain might prove useful in the industrial utilisation of lignocellulosic residues.

Keywords
Vanillin, Cystobasidium, Bioconversion, Biodegradation, Cystobasidiomycetes, Rhodotorula
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27861 (URN)10.1186/s13568-018-0666-4 (DOI)000442555800002 ()30143905 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85052069822 (Scopus ID)
Note

Operational Programme European Regional Development Fund (OP ERDF) Grant no: CCI: 2014SE16RFOP007  20201022

Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-11-27Bibliographically approved
Falk, A. B., Lindström, S., Mattsson, M. & Wright, S. A. I. (2018). Influence of some weather parameters on the susceptibility of apple fruit to postharvest grey mould attack. In: Proceedings 2018: . Paper presented at 18th International Conference on Organic Fruit Growing; University of Hohenheim, Germany; 19-21 February 2018 (pp. 124-127).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of some weather parameters on the susceptibility of apple fruit to postharvest grey mould attack
2018 (English)In: Proceedings 2018, 2018, p. 124-127Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Several cultural and weather factors during the season influence the susceptibility of apple fruit to post-harvest pathogens. In the present study, the effect of different weather parameters on postharvest susceptibility of apples of the cv. ‘Ingrid Marie’ to grey mould was investigated. In 2015, apple fruit were collected from orchards in Southern Sweden, where local weather stations monitored different parameters. After harvest, the fruit were tested for susceptibility to grey mould by artificially inoculating them with%FLQHUHD. Lesion development was monitored over a 10-day-period. Analysis of results for a few orchards showed that cold weather for over a month preceding harvest and a low total number of growth degree days gave apples that were more susceptible to grey mould. This study was carried out in conventional orchards, but the conclusions can be important also for organic production, since they deal with the general effect of sunshine, temperature and rain, factors that may strengthen fruit during cultivation, regardless of production type. Future studies may focus on organic production to investigate whether these effects are general and also apply to organic production.

Keywords
sun, temperature, apple, Botyris cinerea, prediction
National Category
Food Science Biological Sciences Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-28730 (URN)
Conference
18th International Conference on Organic Fruit Growing; University of Hohenheim, Germany; 19-21 February 2018
Available from: 2018-11-30 Created: 2018-11-30 Last updated: 2018-11-30Bibliographically approved
Pinedo, C., Wright, S. A. I., Collado, I. G., Goss, R. J. M., Castoria, R., Hrelia, P., . . . Durán-Patrón, R. (2018). Isotopic Labeling Studies Reveal the Patulin Detoxification Pathway by the Biocontrol Yeast Rhodotorula kratochvilovae LS11. Journal of Natural Products, 81(12), 2692-2699
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Isotopic Labeling Studies Reveal the Patulin Detoxification Pathway by the Biocontrol Yeast Rhodotorula kratochvilovae LS11
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Natural Products, ISSN 0163-3864, E-ISSN 1520-6025, Vol. 81, no 12, p. 2692-2699Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Patulin (1) is a mycotoxin contaminant in fruit and vegetable products worldwide. Biocontrol agents, such as the yeast Rhodotorula kratochvilovae strain LS11, can reduce patulin (1) contamination in food. R. kratochvilovae LS11 converts patulin (1) into desoxypatulinic acid (DPA) (5), which is less cytotoxic than the mycotoxin (1) to in vitro human lymphocytes. In the present study, we report our investigations into the pathway of degradation of patulin (1) to DPA (5) by R. kratochvilovae. Isotopic labeling experiments revealed that 5 derives from patulin (1) through the hydrolysis of the γ-lactone ring and subsequent enzymatic modifications. The ability of patulin (1) and DPA (5) to cause genetic damage was also investigated by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay on in vitro human lymphocytes. Patulin (1) was demonstrated to cause much higher chromosomal damage than DPA (5).

National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-28699 (URN)10.1021/acs.jnatprod.8b00539 (DOI)000454962500011 ()30460844 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059442745 (Scopus ID)
Note

Finansiärer:

MINECO  Grant no: AGL2015-65684-C2-1-R and HI2007-0026 

Italian Ministry of University and Research (Project PRIN) Grant no: 2006072204 

Available from: 2018-11-28 Created: 2018-11-28 Last updated: 2019-03-01Bibliographically approved
Wright, S. A. I. & Rönnander, J. (2018). Novel biodegradation of vanillin by a woodinhabiting isolate of Cystobasidium sp.. In: Book of abstracts: International Specialized Symposium on Yeasts ISSY 34. Paper presented at 34th International Specialized Symposium on Yeasts, ISSY 34; Bariloche, Patagonia, Argentina; 1-4 October 2018 (pp. 114-114).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Novel biodegradation of vanillin by a woodinhabiting isolate of Cystobasidium sp.
2018 (English)In: Book of abstracts: International Specialized Symposium on Yeasts ISSY 34, 2018, p. 114-114Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Cystobasidium species are mostly found in temperate or cold environments. They have been isolated from a wide range of habitats: plants, soils, rocks, aquatic environments and indoor dust. The genus Cystobasidium mainly consists of species of red yeasts in the Rhodotorula minuta clade. These basidiomycetous yeast species are commonly found in temperate to cold regions. In the present study, two strains of Cystobasidium sp. were isolated from decaying wood of housing on the Faroe Islands, where the average yearly temperature ranges from 2°C to 13°C. The sequences of the two strains had two identical gaps within the ITS1ހ5.8SހITS2 region and a second gap within the D1/D2 LSU unit, when aligned to those of C. laryngis CBS 2221, their closest match. The isolates were designated as Cystobasidium sp. Both isolates converted vanillin into vanillyl alcohol in the presence of oxygen. The biotransformation of vanillin into vanillyl alcohol has been documented for only a few species of fungi, but to our knowledge, it has not previously been reported for any basidiomycetous yeast species. Rhodotorula rubra, a distantly related basidiomycetous yeast converts vanillin into vanillic acid. In the present study, the two isolates of Cystobasidium sp. did not produce any trace of vanillic acid, as determined by LC-MS, 1HހNMR and GC. Oxidizing vanillin into vanillic acid should be preferred by the fungi, since it results in more chemical energy, as compared to reducing it to vanillyl alcohol. The fungus may choose this pathway to escape the toxicity of both vanillin and vanillic acid. Vanillin has antimicrobial activity, and vanillic acid is more toxic than vanillyl alcohol. Vanillin is a constituent of the lignin molecule. Cystobasidium species are commonly found in the phyllosphere. Their ability to utilize plant chemicals should render them successful competitors on plants and wood.

National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-28739 (URN)
Conference
34th International Specialized Symposium on Yeasts, ISSY 34; Bariloche, Patagonia, Argentina; 1-4 October 2018
Available from: 2018-12-03 Created: 2018-12-03 Last updated: 2018-12-11Bibliographically approved
Puglisi, I., De Patrizio, A., Schena, L., Jung, T., Evoli, M., Pane, A., . . . Cacciola, S. O. (2017). Two previously unknown Phytophthora species associated with brown rot of Pomelo (Citrus grandis) fruits in Vietnam. PLoS ONE, 12(2), Article ID e0172085.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Two previously unknown Phytophthora species associated with brown rot of Pomelo (Citrus grandis) fruits in Vietnam
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2017 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 2, article id e0172085Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Two distinct Phytophthora taxa were found to be associated with brown rot of pomelo (Citrus grandis), a new disease of this ancestral Citrus species, in the Vinh Long province, Mekong River Delta area, southern Vietnam. On the basis of morphological characters and using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of the rDNA and the cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) as barcode genes, one of the two taxa was provisionally named as Phytophthora sp. prodigiosa, being closely related to but distinct from P. insolita, a species in Phytophthora Clade 9, while the other one, was closely related to but distinct from the Clade 2 species P. meadii and was informally designated as Phytophthora sp. mekongensis. Isolates of P. sp. prodigiosa and P. sp. mekongensis were also obtained from necrotic fibrous roots of Volkamer lemon (C. volkameriana) rootstocks grafted with 'King' mandarin (Citrus nobilis) and from trees of pomelo, respectively, in other provinces of the Mekong River Delta, indicating a widespread occurrence of both Phytophthora species in this citrus-growing area. Koch's postulates were fulfilled via pathogenicity tests on fruits of various Citrus species, including pomelo, grapefruit (Citrus x paradisi), sweet orange (Citrus x sinensis) and bergamot (Citrus x bergamia) as well as on the rootstock of 2-year-old trees of pomelo and sweet orange on 'Carrizo' citrange (C. sinensis 'Washington Navel' x Poncirus trifoliata). This is the first report of a Phytophthora species from Clade 2 other than P. citricola and P. citrophthora as causal agent of fruit brown rot of Citrus worldwide and the first report of P. insolita complex in Vietnam. Results indicate that likely Vietnam is still an unexplored reservoir of Phytophthora diversity.

National Category
Horticulture
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23700 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0172085 (DOI)000394424500080 ()28208159 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85013093738 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-03-02 Created: 2017-03-02 Last updated: 2018-11-28Bibliographically approved
Van Tri, M., Van Hoa, N., Minh Chau, N., Pane, A., Faedda, R., De Patrizio, A., . . . Cacciola, S. O. (2015). Decline of jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus) incited by Phytophthora palmivora in Vietnam. Phytopathologia Mediterranea, 54(2), 275-280
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decline of jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus) incited by Phytophthora palmivora in Vietnam
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2015 (English)In: Phytopathologia Mediterranea, ISSN ISSN 0031-9465, EISSN 1593-2095, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 275-280Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A new disease of jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.) was observed in the south- eastern region of South Vietnam. Symptoms included root rot, cankers and gummosis of trunks, chlorosis, wilt, blight of leaves, defoliation, fruit brown rot, and tree death. The disease was found in 10% of surveyed farms with an incidence varying from 2% to nearly 60% of the trees. A Phytophthora species, identified as P. palmivora (Butler) Butler, using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of the rDNA as a barcode gene and morphological and cultural features, was consistently isolated from symptomatic roots, fruits, trunk cankers and leaves. Koch’s postulates were fulfilled using pathogenicity tests on seedlings, leaves and detached fruits of jackfruit. To our knowledge, this is the first report of P. palmivora on jackfruit in Vietnam.

Keywords
Oomycetes, South Vietnam, ITS regions, A1 mating type, Koch’s postulates
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-20061 (URN)10.14601/Phytopathol_Mediterr-15008 (DOI)000361471700008 ()2-s2.0-84959858574 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education (STINT)
Note

Funding Agency:

SAMAGRUMI (Sensori Ambientali per il Miglioramento della Qualita delle Produzioni Agrumicole)   PO. FESR Sicily

Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research (MIUR)  Grant no: FIRB 2010-RB-FR10PZ4N

Available from: 2015-08-05 Created: 2015-08-05 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Wright, S. A. I. (2015). Patulin in food. Current Opinion in Food Science, 5, 105-109
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patulin in food
2015 (English)In: Current Opinion in Food Science, ISSN 2214-7993, E-ISSN 2214-8000, Vol. 5, p. 105-109Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Patulin is produced by species of Penicillium, Aspergillus and Byssochlamys. It is a mycotoxin that primarily contaminates pome fruit products, but is being reported from other fruit and foods, for example shellfish and cheese. New findings reveal that patulin binds to the bases of DNA, in addition to its well-established ability to conjugate sulfhydryl groups. Novel cellular targets are also being uncovered. In the EU, patulin levels in apple products are now mostly below specified limits. Biocontrol agents either prevent infection by mycotoxigenic fungi or lower patulin levels. More knowledge about critical control points, the role of patulin in plant disease, and the environmental cues that stimulate patulin production will enable the tailoring of effective, future control measures.

Keywords
Patulin, mycotoxin
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-20920 (URN)10.1016/j.cofs.2015.10.003 (DOI)000394654500017 ()2-s2.0-84952650337 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Aboul-Ata, A.-A. E., Vitti, A., Nuzzaci, M., El-Attar, A. K., Piazzolla, G., Tortorella, C., . . . Piazzolla, P. (2014). Plant-Based Vaccines: Novel and Low-Cost Possible Route for Mediterranean Innovative Vaccination Strategies. In: Maramorosch, K; Murphy, F A (Ed.), Advances in Virus Research: (pp. 1-37). Elsevier, 89
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Plant-Based Vaccines: Novel and Low-Cost Possible Route for Mediterranean Innovative Vaccination Strategies
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2014 (English)In: Advances in Virus Research / [ed] Maramorosch, K; Murphy, F A, Elsevier, 2014, Vol. 89, p. 1-37Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A plant bioreactor has enormous capability as a system that supports many biological activities, that is, production of plant bodies, virus-like particles (VLPs), and vaccines. Foreign gene expression is an efficient mechanism for getting protein vaccines against different human viral and nonviral diseases. Plants make it easy to deal with safe, inexpensive, and provide trouble-free storage. The broad spectrum of safe gene promoters is being used to avoid risk assessments. Engineered virus-based vectors have no side effect. The process can be manipulated as follows: (a) retrieve and select gene encoding, use an antigenic protein from GenBank and/or from a viral-genome sequence, (b) design and construct hybrid-virus vectors (viral vector with a gene of interest) eventually flanked by plant-specific genetic regulatory elements for constitutive expression for obtaining chimeric virus, (c) gene transformation and/or transfection, for transient expression, into a plant host model, that is, tobacco, to get protocols processed positively, and then moving into edible host plants, (d) confirmation of protein expression by bioassay, PCR-associated tests (RT-PCR), Northern and Western blotting analysis, and serological assay (ELISA), (e) expression for adjuvant recombinant protein seeking better antigenicity, (f) extraction and purification of expressed protein for identification and dosing, (g) antigenicity capability evaluated using parental or oral delivery in animal models (mice and/or rabbit immunization), and (h) growing of construct-treated edible crops in protective green houses. Some successful cases of heterologous gene-expressed protein, as edible vaccine, are being discussed, that is, hepatitis C virus (HCV). R9 mimotope, also named hypervariable region 1 (HVR1), was derived from the HVR1 of HCV. It was used as a potential neutralizing epitope of HCV. The mimotope was expressed using cucumber mosaic virus coat protein (CP), alfalfa mosaic virus CP P3/RNA3, and tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) CP tobacco mild green mosaic virus (TMGMV) CP as expression vectors into tobacco plants. Expressed recombinant protein has not only been confirmed as a therapeutic but also as a diagnostic tool. Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), HSV-2 gD, and HSV-2 VP16 subunits were transfected into tobacco plants, using TMV CP TMGMV CP expression vectors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Series
Advances in Virus Research, ISSN 0065-3527 ; 89
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-18220 (URN)10.1016/B978-0-12-800172-1.00001-X (DOI)000335807700001 ()2-s2.0-84898925463 (Scopus ID)978-0-12-800172-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-11-29 Created: 2014-11-28 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Wright, S. A. I., de Felice, D., Ianiri, G., Pinedo-Rivilla, C., De Curtis, F. & Castoria, R. (2014). Two rapid assays for screening of patulin biodegradation. International Journal of Environmental Science and Technology, 11(5), 1387-1398
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Two rapid assays for screening of patulin biodegradation
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2014 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 1735-1472, E-ISSN 1735-2630, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 1387-1398Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The mycotoxin patulin is produced by the blue mould pathogen Penicillium expansum in rotting apples during postharvest storage. Patulin is toxic to a wide range of organisms, including humans, animals, fungi and bacteria. Wash water from apple packing and processing houses often harbours patulin and fungal spores, which can contaminate the environment. Ubiquitous epiphytic yeasts, such as Rhodosporidium kratochvilovae strain LS11 which is a biocontrol agent of P. expansum in apples, have the capacity to resist the toxicity of patulin and to biodegrade it. Two non-toxic products are formed. One is desoxypatulinic acid. The aim of the work was to develop rapid, high-throughput bioassays for monitoring patulin degradation in multiple samples. Escherichia coli was highly sensitive to patulin, but insensitive to desoxypatulinic acid. This was utilized to develop a detection test for patulin, replacing time-consuming thin layer chromatography or high-performance liquid chromatography. Two assays for patulin degradation were developed, one in liquid medium and the other in semi-solid medium. Both assays allow the contemporary screening of a large number of samples. The liquid medium assay utilizes 96-well microtiter plates and was optimized for using a minimum of patulin. The semi-solid medium assay has the added advantage of slowing down the biodegradation, which allows the study and isolation of transient degradation products. The two assays are complementary and have several areas of utilization, from screening a bank of microorganisms for biodegradation ability to the study of biodegradation pathways.

Keywords
Apple, Desoxypatulinic acid, Mycotoxin
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-15974 (URN)10.1007/s13762-013-0325-x (DOI)000338118100020 ()2-s2.0-84902367658 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-01-09 Created: 2014-01-09 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8895-5631

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