hig.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Crenshaw, Albert G.
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 51) Show all publications
Sandberg, C., Crenshaw, A. G., Elcadi, G. H., Christensen, C., Hlebowicz, J., Thilén, U. & Johansson, B. (2018). Impaired skeletal muscle endurance in adults with complex congenital heart disease is associated with local muscle oxygenation. International Journal of Cardiology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impaired skeletal muscle endurance in adults with complex congenital heart disease is associated with local muscle oxygenation
Show others...
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Keywords
Congenital heart disease, Muscle function, Muscle endurance, Muscle oxygenation, near-infrared spectroscopy
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27641 (URN)
Available from: 2018-08-14 Created: 2018-08-14 Last updated: 2018-09-04Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, P., Crenshaw, A. G., Edmunsson, D., Toolanen, G. & Crnalic, S. (2017). Muscle oxygenation in Type 1 diabetic and non-diabetic patients with and without chronic compartment syndrome. PLoS ONE, 12(10), Article ID e0186790.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Muscle oxygenation in Type 1 diabetic and non-diabetic patients with and without chronic compartment syndrome
Show others...
2017 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 10, article id e0186790Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Type 1 diabetic patients and non-diabetic patients were referred for evaluation for chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) based on clinical examination and complaints of activity-related leg pain in the region of the tibialis anterior muscle. Previous studies using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) showed greater deoxygenation during exercise for CECS patients versus healthy controls; however, this comparison has not been done for diabetic CECS patients.

Methods. We used NIRS to test for differences in oxygenation kinetics for Type 1 diabetic patients diagnosed with (CECS-diabetics, n = 9) versus diabetic patients without (CON-diabetics, n = 10) leg anterior chronic exertional compartment syndrome. Comparisons were also made between non-diabetic CECS patients (n = 11) and healthy controls (CON, n = 10). The experimental protocol consisted of thigh arterial cuff occlusion (AO, 1-minute duration), and treadmill running to reproduce symptoms. NIRS variables generated were resting StO2%, and oxygen recovery following AO. Also, during and following treadmill running the magnitude of deoxygenation and oxygen recovery, respectively, were determined.

Results. There was no difference in resting StO2%between CECS-diabetics (78.2±12.6%) vs. CONdiabetics (69.1±20.8%), or between CECS (69.3±16.2) vs. CON (75.9±11.2%). However, oxygen recovery following AO was significantly slower for CECS (1.8±0.8%/sec) vs. CON (3.8±1.7%/sec) (P = 0.002); these data were not different between the diabetic groups. StO2%during exercise was lower (greater deoxygenation) for CECS-diabetics (6.3±8.6%) vs. CON-diabetics (40.4±22.0%), and for CECS (11.3±16.8%) vs. CON (34.1±21.2%) (P<0.05 for both). The rate of oxygen recovery post exercise was faster for CECS-diabetics (3.5±2.6%/sec) vs. CON-diabetics (1.4±0.8%/sec) (P = 0.04), and there was a tendency of difference for CECS (3.1±1.4%/sec) vs. CON (1.9±1.3%/sec) (P = 0.05).

Conclusion. The greater deoxygenation during treadmill running for the CECS-diabetics group (vs. CON-diabetics) is in line with previous studies (and with the present study) that compared non-diabetic CECS patients with healthy controls. Our findings could suggest that NIRS may be useful as a diagnostic tool for assessing Type 1 diabetic patients suspected of CECS.

National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25463 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0186790 (DOI)000413403000042 ()29059243 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85032174485 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-25 Created: 2017-10-25 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Gold, J., Hallman, D., Hellström, F., Björklund, M., Crenshaw, A. G., Mathiassen, S. E., . . . Ali, S. (2017). Systematic review of quantitative imaging biomarkers for neck and shoulder musculoskeletal disorders. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 18, Article ID 395.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Systematic review of quantitative imaging biomarkers for neck and shoulder musculoskeletal disorders
Show others...
2017 (English)In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 18, article id 395Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

This study systematically summarizes quantitative imaging biomarker research in non-traumatic neck and shoulder musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). There were two research questions: 1) Are there quantitative imaging biomarkers associated with the presence of neck and shoulder MSDs?, 2) Are there quantitative imaging biomarkers associated with the severity of neck and shoulder MSDs?

Methods

PubMed and SCOPUS were used for the literature search. One hundred and twenty-five studies met primary inclusion criteria. Data were extracted from 49 sufficient quality studies.

Results

Most of the 125 studies were cross-sectional and utilized convenience samples of patients as both cases and controls. Only half controlled for potential confounders via exclusion or in the analysis. Approximately one-third reported response rates. In sufficient quality articles, 82% demonstrated at least one statistically significant association between the MSD(s) and biomarker(s) studied. The literature synthesis suggested that neck muscle size may be decreased in neck pain, and trapezius myalgia and neck/shoulder pain may be associated with reduced vascularity in the trapezius and reduced trapezius oxygen saturation at rest and in response to upper extremity tasks. Reduced vascularity in the supraspinatus tendon may also be a feature in rotator cuff tears. Five of eight studies showed an association between a quantitative imaging marker and MSD severity.

Conclusions

Although research on quantitative imaging biomarkers is still in a nascent stage, some MSD biomarkers were identified. There are limitations in the articles examined, including possible selection bias and inattention to potentially confounding factors. Recommendations for future studies are provided.

Keywords
MRI, MSD, near-infrared spectroscopy, overuse, pain, PET/CT, thermography
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-20784 (URN)10.1186/s12891-017-1694-y (DOI)000410323900001 ()10.1186/s12891-017-1694-y (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85029322406 (Scopus ID)
Projects
ImagingBiorev
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761NIH (National Institute of Health), AR056019
Available from: 2015-12-04 Created: 2015-12-04 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved
Richter, H., Crenshaw, A. G., Domkin, D. & Elcadi, G. H. (2016). Near infrared spectroscopy as a useful research tool to measure prefrontal cortex activity during visually demanding near work. IIE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors, 4(2-3), 164-174
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Near infrared spectroscopy as a useful research tool to measure prefrontal cortex activity during visually demanding near work
2016 (English)In: IIE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors, ISSN ISSN 2157-7323, Vol. 4, no 2-3, p. 164-174Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Unlike the usual skeletal muscles, ciliary muscles responsible for focusing the crystalline eye lens and extraocular muscles responsible for convergence eye movements appear resistant to fatigue. Purpose: The dual goals of this article are to briefly outline the current evidence that suggests that probing into blood flow and hemodynamic prefrontal brain activity with Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) could advance progress in visual ergonomic research, and to provide pilot data exemplifying the proposed approach. Methods: The vision task consisted of sustained focusing on a contrast-varying black and white Gabor grating. Four participants with a median age of 46 (IQR 44 – 50) fixated the grating from a distance of 65 cm. Three counterbalanced 10-min tasks required central fixation and accommodation/convergence on the grating target through: (i) 0.0 diopter (D) lenses, (ii) −1.5 D lenses, and (iii) −3.5yD lenses while maintaining maximal focus. Non-invasive measurements of local oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) were quantified with a one-channel Near Infrared Spectrometer, NIRS. The NIRS probe was placed on the prefrontal cortex in the vicinity of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex or Brodmann area 46 (DLPFC, BA 46). Accommodation response and contrast threshold was measured in parallel. Results: General estimating equation analyses showed that baseline subtracted DLPFC blood flow (ΔHbO2) increased significantly over time in all three lens conditions. The effect of time may be caused by a continuous increase in mental effort to compensate for progressively more mental fatigue induced by increased visual attention. The increase of DLPFC ΔHbO2 was also larger in magnitude in participants with larger amplitudes accommodation response (i.e., in participants who minimized deterioration in visual performance). Conclusion: The results from this study indicate that oxyhemoglobin changes recorded over DLPFC with NIRS can be used to assay the degree to which the visual system is strained during demanding near work.

Keywords
Attention fatigue, Accommodation, Compensatory effort, Discomfort, Electromyography, Mental fatigue, Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, Neck pain, Productivity, Visual ergonomics
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-18657 (URN)10.1080/21577323.2015.1067258 (DOI)000442406000008 ()
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Note

Accepted author version posted online.

Available from: 2015-01-01 Created: 2015-01-01 Last updated: 2018-12-06Bibliographically approved
Gold, J. E., Hallman, D., Hellström, F., Björklund, M., Crenshaw, A. G., Djupsjöbacka, M., . . . Barbe, M. F. (2016). Systematic review of biochemical biomarkers for neck and upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorders. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 42(2), 103-124
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Systematic review of biochemical biomarkers for neck and upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorders
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 103-124Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective:  This study systematically summarizes biochemical biomarker research in non-traumatic musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs).  Two research questions guided the review:  1) Are there biochemical markers associated with neck and upper extremity MSDs? and, 2) Are there biochemical markers associated with the severity of neck and upper extremity MSDs? 

Methods:  A literature search was conducted in PubMed and SCOPUS.  Eighty-seven studies met primary inclusion criteria.  Following a quality screen, data were extracted from 44 sufficient quality articles.

Results:  Most of the 87 studies were cross-sectional and utilized convenience samples of patients as both cases and controls.  A response rate was explicitly stated in only 11 (13%) studies.  Less than half of the studies controlled for potential confounding through restriction or in the analysis.  Most sufficient quality studies were conducted in older populations (mean age in one or more analysis group > 50 yrs).

In sufficient quality articles, 82% demonstrated at least one statistically significant association between the MSD(s) and biomarker(s) studied.  Evidence suggested that: a) the collagen repair marker TIMP-1 is decreased in fibroproliferative disorders, b) 5-HT (serotonin) is increased in trapezius myalgia, and c) triglycerides are increased in a variety of MSDs.  Only five studies showed an association between a biochemical marker and MSD severity.

Conclusion: While some MSD biomarkers were identified, limitations in the articles examined included possible selection bias, confounding, spectrum effect (potentially heterogeneous biomarker associations in populations according to symptom severity or duration) and insufficient attention to co-morbid conditions. A list of recommendations for future studies is provided.

Keywords
collagen degradation and repair, inflammation, lipids, muscle injury, muscle metabolites, pain, serotonin, tendon injury, triglycerides
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-19271 (URN)10.5271/sjweh.3533 (DOI)000371449500002 ()26599377 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84959483922 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Available from: 2015-05-02 Created: 2015-05-02 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved
Elcadi, G., Forsman, M., Hallman, D., Aasa, U., Fahlström, M. & Crenshaw, A. (2014). Oxygenation and hemodynamics do not underlie early muscle fatigue for patients with work-related muscle pain. PLoS ONE, 9(4), e95582
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oxygenation and hemodynamics do not underlie early muscle fatigue for patients with work-related muscle pain
Show others...
2014 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 4, p. e95582-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Patients suffering from work-related muscle pain (WRMP) fatigue earlier during exercise than healthy controls. Inadequate oxygen consumption and/or inadequate blood supply can influence the ability of the muscles to withstand fatigue. However, it remains unknown if oxygenation and hemodynamics are associated with early fatigue in muscles of WRMP patients. In the present study we applied near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) on the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) and trapezius (TD) muscles of patients with WRMP (n = 18) and healthy controls (n = 17). Our objective was to determine if there were group differences in endurance times for a low-level contraction of 15% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) – sustained for 12-13 min, and to see if these differences were associated with differences in muscle oxygenation and hemodynamics. At baseline, oxygen saturation (StO2%) was similar between groups for the ECR, but StO2% was significantly lower for TD for the WRMP patients (76%) compared to controls (85%) (P < 0.01). Also, baseline ECR blood flow was similar in the two groups. For both muscles there were a larger number of patients, compared to controls, that did not maintain the 15% MVC for the allotted time. Consequently, the endurance times were significantly shorter for the WRMP patients than controls (medians, ECR: 347 s vs. 582 s; TD: 430 s vs. 723 s respectively). Responses in StO2% during the contractions were not significantly different between groups for either muscle, i.e. no apparent difference in oxygen consumption. Overall, we interpret our findings to indicate that the early fatigue for our WRMP patients was not associated with muscle oxygenation and hemodynamics.

Keywords
Near Infrared Spectroscopy, Electromyography, muscle pain, trapezius, extensor carpi radialis, oxygenation, hemodynamics, fatigue
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-16596 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0095582 (DOI)000335240300056 ()24755957 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84899705131 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-04-30 Created: 2014-04-30 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Crenshaw, A., Fahlström, M. & Lyskov, E. (2013). A gender comparison of electromyography (EMG) during repetitive arm work with and without mental stress. Paper presented at Joint Annual Meeting of the ASPET/BPS at Experimental Biology (EB), April 20-24, 2013, Boston, MA. The FASEB Journal, 27, 1152.21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A gender comparison of electromyography (EMG) during repetitive arm work with and without mental stress
2013 (English)In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 27, p. 1152.21-Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-17928 (URN)000319860505475 ()
Conference
Joint Annual Meeting of the ASPET/BPS at Experimental Biology (EB), April 20-24, 2013, Boston, MA
Available from: 2014-11-10 Created: 2014-11-10 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Hadrevi, J., Ghafouri, B., Sjörs, A., Antti, H., Larsson, B., Crenshaw, A., . . . Hellström, F. (2013). Comparative metabolomics of muscle interstitium fluid in human trapezius myalgia: an in vivo microdialysis study. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 113(12), 2977-2989
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparative metabolomics of muscle interstitium fluid in human trapezius myalgia: an in vivo microdialysis study
Show others...
2013 (English)In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 113, no 12, p. 2977-2989Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE:

The mechanisms behind trapezius myalgia are unclear. Many hypotheses have been presented suggesting an altered metabolism in the muscle. Here, muscle microdialysate from healthy and myalgic muscle is analysed using metabolomics. Metabolomics analyse a vast number of metabolites, enabling a comprehensive explorative screening of the cellular processes in the muscle.

METHODS:

Microdialysate samples were obtained from the shoulder muscle of healthy and myalgic subjects that performed a work and stress test. Samples from the baseline period and from the recovery period were analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) together with multivariate analysis to detect differences in extracellular content of metabolites between groups. Systematic differences in metabolites between groups were identified using multivariate analysis and orthogonal partial least square discriminate analysis (OPLS-DA). A complementary Mann-Whitney U test of group difference in individual metabolites was also performed.

RESULTS:

A large number of metabolites were detected and identified in this screening study. At baseline, no systematic differences between groups were observed according to the OPLS-DA. However, two metabolites, L-leucine and pyroglutamic acid, were significantly more abundant in the myalgic muscle compared to the healthy muscle. In the recovery period, systematic difference in metabolites between the groups was observed according to the OPLS-DA. The groups differed in amino acids, fatty acids and carbohydrates. Myristic acid and putrescine were significantly more abundant and beta-D-glucopyranose was significantly less abundant in the myalgic muscle.

CONCLUSION:

This study provides important information regarding the metabolite content, thereby presenting new clues regarding the pathophysiology of the myalgic muscle.

Keywords
Metabolomics; Trapezius myalgia; Microdialysis; Repetitive work; Recovery; GC-MS; Metabolites
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-13800 (URN)10.1007/s00421-013-2716-6 (DOI)000327087000009 ()24078209 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84890282309 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761; 2010-0913Swedish Research Council, K2011-69X-21874-01-6
Available from: 2013-02-06 Created: 2013-02-06 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Sandfeld, J., Larsen, L. H., Crenshaw, A. & Jensen, B. R. (2013). Muscle oxygenation, EMG, and cardiovascular responses for cabin attendants vs. controls. Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine, 84(5), 478-485
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Muscle oxygenation, EMG, and cardiovascular responses for cabin attendants vs. controls
2013 (English)In: Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 0095-6562, E-ISSN 1943-4448, Vol. 84, no 5, p. 478-485Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: The goal was to investigate the effect of acute moderate hypobaric exposure on the physiological responses to sustained contractions (local) and light to moderate dynamic exercise (systemic) for cabin attendants (CAB) and a matched control group (CON).

METHOD: There were 14 CAB and 13 CON who participated. The experimental protocol was designed as a 2 x 2 randomized crossover study for which subjects performed a forearm isometric test and a cycling test in normobaric (NORM) and hypobaric [HYPO; 574 mmHg approximately 8000 ft (2440 m) above sea level (ASL)] conditions. Oxygen saturation (StO2%) was measured in the extensor carpi radialis muscle at rest and during an isometric wrist extension (20% MVC). Heart rate (HR), ventilation (V(E)), and oxygen uptake (VO2) were measured at rest, during cycling exercise at intensities of 50 W and 100 W, and during recovery. Blood samples were collected and analyzed for hemoglobin concentrations.

RESULTS: Local response: There was a significant effect of HYPO for both CAB and CON with a decrease in StO2% of 6.5% both at rest and during contraction. Systemic response: there was no general effect of HYPO on HR, VE, or VO2. No differences were found between groups in either the local or systemic response or in the blood parameters.

CONCLUSION: This study shows an effect of moderate hypobaric exposure on local muscle oxygenation during rest and sustained contraction. Whether this has an impact on fatigue development during work among cabin attendants is discussed.

Keywords
hypoxia, hypobaric, NIRS, EMG, attendants
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-17327 (URN)10.3357/ASEM.3443.2013 (DOI)000332996000004 ()2-s2.0-84878557893 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-08-08 Created: 2014-08-08 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Elcadi, G., Forsman, M., Aasa, U., Fahlström, M. & Crenshaw, A. (2013). Shoulder and forearm oxygenation and myoelectric activityin patients with work-related muscle pain and healthy subjects. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 113(5), 1103-1115
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shoulder and forearm oxygenation and myoelectric activityin patients with work-related muscle pain and healthy subjects
Show others...
2013 (English)In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 113, no 5, p. 1103-1115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Near infrared spectroscopy, Electromyography, Muscle pain, Trapezius, Extensor carpi radialis
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-13341 (URN)10.1007/s00421-012-2530-6 (DOI)000317627700001 ()2-s2.0-84876335490 (Scopus ID)
Projects
NirsPat
Available from: 2012-11-05 Created: 2012-11-05 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications