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Willander, Johan
Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Robinson, Y., Olerud, C. & Willander, J. (2017). Do biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs reduce the spinal fracture risk related to ankylosing spondylitis?: A longitudinal multiregistry matched cohort study. BMJ Open, 7(12), Article ID e016548.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs reduce the spinal fracture risk related to ankylosing spondylitis?: A longitudinal multiregistry matched cohort study
2017 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 12, article id e016548Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is associated with an increased spinal fracture risk due to the loss of elasticity in spinal motion segments. With the introduction of biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (bDMARD) treatment for AS, the individual course of the disease has been ameliorated. This study aims to examine the association of bDMARD treatment and risk of spinal fracture.

Design: Longitudinal population-based multiregistry observational matched cohort study.

Setting: Swedish Patient Registry 1987-2014 and Swedish Prescribed Drugs Registry 2005-2014.

Participants: Included were patients ≥18 years of age receiving treatment at a healthcare facility for the primary diagnosis of AS. About 1352 patients received more than one prescription of bDMARD from 2005 to 2014. An untreated control group was created by propensity score matching for age, sex, comorbidity, antirheumatic prescriptions and years with AS (n=1352).

Main Outcome Measures: Spinal fracture-free survival.

Results: No bDMARD treatment-related effect on spinal fracture-free survival was observed in the matched cohorts. Male gender (HR=2.54, 95% CI 1.48 to 4.36) and Charlson Comorbidity Index score (HR=3.02, 95% CI 1.59 to 5.75) contributed significantly to spinal fracture risk.

Conclusion: bDMARD had no medium-term effect on the spinal fracture-free survival in patients with AS.

Trial Registration Number: NCT02840695

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2017
Keywords
ankylosing spondylitis, fracture, rheumatology, spine
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25977 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016548 (DOI)000423826700027 ()2-s2.0-85053120396 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agency:

- Medtronic  

- DePuy Synthes 

Available from: 2018-01-10 Created: 2018-01-10 Last updated: 2018-09-24Bibliographically approved
Carrwik, C., Murakami, H., Willander, J. & Robinson, Y. (2017). Potential harms of interventions for spinal metastatic disease. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (7), Article ID CD012724.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Potential harms of interventions for spinal metastatic disease
2017 (English)In: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ISSN 1469-493X, E-ISSN 1469-493X, no 7, article id CD012724Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: The primary objective of this review is to compare the potential harms of treatment for spinal metastatic disease for the following treatments: 1. Surgical intervention. 2. Surgical intervention with radiation therapy. 3. Radiation therapy alone. Our secondary objectives are: 1. comparing the harms of different surgical methods; 2. comparing the harms between different radiation protocols.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley and Sons Ltd, 2017
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25365 (URN)10.1002/14651858.CD012724 (DOI)2-s2.0-85029772442 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-04 Created: 2017-10-04 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Knez, I., Ljunglöf, L., Arshamian, A. & Willander, J. (2017). Self-grounding visual, auditory and olfactory autobiographical memories. Consciousness and Cognition, 52, 1-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-grounding visual, auditory and olfactory autobiographical memories
2017 (English)In: Consciousness and Cognition, ISSN 1053-8100, E-ISSN 1090-2376, Vol. 52, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Given that autobiographical memory provides a cognitive foundation for the self, we investigated the relative importance of visual, auditory and olfactory autobiographical memories for the self. Thirty subjects, with a mean age of 35.4 years, participated in a study involving a three × three within-subject design containing nine different types of autobiographical memory cues: pictures, sounds and odors presented with neutral, positive and negative valences. It was shown that visual compared to auditory and olfactory autobiographical memories involved higher cognitive and emotional constituents for the self. Furthermore, there was a trend showing positive autobiographical memories to increase their proportion to both cognitive and emotional components of the self, from olfactory to auditory to visually cued autobiographical memories; but, yielding a reverse trend for negative autobiographical memories. Finally, and independently of modality, positive affective states were shown to be more involved in autobiographical memory than negative ones. 

Keywords
Autobiographical memory, Sensory information, The self, adult, clinical article, human, odor, sound
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-24295 (URN)10.1016/j.concog.2017.04.008 (DOI)000404324300001 ()28448791 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85018575287 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M14-0375:1
Available from: 2017-06-16 Created: 2017-06-16 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Robinson, Y., Sheta, R., Salci, K. & Willander, J. (2015). Blood loss in surgery for aggressive vertebral haemangioma with and without embolisation. Asian Spine Journal, 9(3), 483-491
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Blood loss in surgery for aggressive vertebral haemangioma with and without embolisation
2015 (English)In: Asian Spine Journal, ISSN 1976-1902, E-ISSN 1976-7846, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 483-491Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite their benign nature some symptomatic aggressive vertebral haemangiomas (AVH) require surgery to decompress spinal cord and/or stabilise pathological fractures. Preoperative embolisation may reduce the considerable blood loss during surgical decompression. This systematic review investigated whether preoperative embolisation reduced surgical blood loss during treatment of symptomatic AVH. PubMed Medline, Web of Science, and Ovid Medline were searched for case reports and clinical studies on surgical AVH treatment. Included were cases from all publications on surgical treatment of AVH where the amount of surgical blood loss and the use of preoperative embolisation were documented. 51 cases with surgically treated AVH were retrieved from the included studies. Blood loss in the embolised treatment group (980±683 mL) was lower than the non-embolised control group (1,629±946 mL). This systematic review found that embolisation prior to AVH resection reduced surgical blood loss (level of evidence, very low) and can be recommended (strong recommendation).

Keywords
Hemangioma; Spinal cord compression; Surgical blood loss; Therapeutic embolisation
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-19951 (URN)10.4184/asj.2015.9.3.483 (DOI)000420344900023 ()26097668 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84933509002 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-07-01 Created: 2015-07-01 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Cornell Kärnekull, S., Jonsson, F. U., Willander, J. & Larsson, M. (2015). Context independent memory for odors and words. Paper presented at 24th Annual Meeting of the European Chemoreception Research Organization (ECRO), September 10-13, 2014, Dijon, FRANCE. Chemical Senses, 40(3), 240-240
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Context independent memory for odors and words
2015 (English)In: Chemical Senses, ISSN 0379-864X, E-ISSN 1464-3553, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 240-240Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-19288 (URN)000351015600085 ()
Conference
24th Annual Meeting of the European Chemoreception Research Organization (ECRO), September 10-13, 2014, Dijon, FRANCE
Available from: 2015-05-05 Created: 2015-05-05 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Cornell Kärnekull, S., Jönsson, F. U., Willander, J., Sikström, S. & Larsson, M. (2015). Long-term memory for odors: influences of familiarity and identification across 64 days. Chemical Senses, 40(4), 259-267
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term memory for odors: influences of familiarity and identification across 64 days
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Chemical Senses, ISSN 0379-864X, E-ISSN 1464-3553, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 259-267Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Few studies have investigated long-term odor recognition memory, although some early observations suggested that the forgetting rate of olfactory representations is slower than for other sensory modalities. This study investigated recognition memory across 64 days for high and low familiar odors and faces. Memory was assessed in 83 young participants at 4 occasions; immediate, 4, 16, and 64 days after encoding. The results indicated significant forgetting for odors and faces across the 64 days. The forgetting functions for the 2 modalities were not fundamentally different. Moreover, high familiar odors and faces were better remembered than low familiar ones, indicating an important role of semantic knowledge on recognition proficiency for both modalities. Although odor recognition was significantly better than chance at the 64 days testing, memory for the low familiar odors was relatively poor. Also, the results indicated that odor identification consistency across sessions, irrespective of accuracy, was positively related to successful recognition.

Keywords
face recognition, identification consistency, odor recognition, olfactory forgetting
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-19109 (URN)10.1093/chemse/bjv003 (DOI)000355703500006 ()2-s2.0-84929393529 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2011-1792Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M14-0375:1
Available from: 2015-03-16 Created: 2015-03-16 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Willander, J., Sikström, S. & Karlsson, K. (2015). Multimodal retrieval of autobiographical memories: sensory information contributes differently to the recollection of events. Frontiers in Psychology, 6, Article ID 1681.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multimodal retrieval of autobiographical memories: sensory information contributes differently to the recollection of events
2015 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 6, article id 1681Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous studies on autobiographical memory have focused on unimodal retrieval cues (i.e., cues pertaining to one modality). However, from an ecological perspective multimodal cues (i.e., cues pertaining to several modalities) are highly important to investigate. In the present study we investigated age distributions and experiential ratings of autobiographical memories retrieved with unimodal and multimodal cues. Sixty-two participants were randomized to one of four cue-conditions: visual, olfactory, auditory, or multimodal. The results showed that the peak of the distributions depends on the modality of the retrieval cue. The results indicated that multimodal retrieval seemed to be driven by visual and auditory information to a larger extent and to a lesser extent by olfactory information. Finally, no differences were observed in the number of retrieved memories or experiential ratings across the four cue-conditions.

Keywords
autobiographical memory, multimodal, multisensory, unimodal, age distribution, experiential ratings
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-20768 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01681 (DOI)000364558400001 ()26594186 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84949656433 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2008-2415
Available from: 2015-12-03 Created: 2015-12-03 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
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