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Nordhall, Ola
Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Nordhall, O. & Knez, I. (2018). Motivation and Justice at Work: The Role of Emotion and Cognition Components of Personal and Collective Work Identity. Frontiers in Psychology, 8, Article ID 2307.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Motivation and Justice at Work: The Role of Emotion and Cognition Components of Personal and Collective Work Identity
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 8, article id 2307Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate the role of personal and collective work identity (including emotion and cognition components), in predicting work motivation (operationalized as work self-determined motivation) and organizational justice (operationalized as organizational pay justice). Digitized questionnaires were distributed bye-mail to 2905 members, teachers, of a Swedish trade union. A total of 768 individuals answered the questionnaire and by that participated in this study. Personal-compared to collective work identity was shown to positively associate with self-determined motivation accounted for by the emotion component of personal work identity. Collective compared to personal work identity was reported to positively associate with organizational pay justice accounted for by the cognition component of collective work identity. All this suggests that both work-related motivation and organizational justice might be, to some extent, accounted for by the psychological mechanisms of work identity and that, as predicted, different types of work identity, play different significant roles in predicting motivation and justice at work. More precisely, the emotion component of work identity was more pronounced in personal work-bonding relationships, and the cognitive component, of work identity in contrast, was more pronounced in collective work-bonding relationships.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
work identity, personal identity, collective identity, work motivation, organizational justice
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26086 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2017.02307 (DOI)000419923000001 ()29379454 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85040868435 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-31 Created: 2018-01-31 Last updated: 2018-10-15Bibliographically approved
Nordhall, O., Knez, I. & Saboonchi, F. (2018). Predicting general mental health and exhaustion: the role of emotion and cognition components of personal and collective work-identity.. Heliyon, 4(8), Article ID e00735.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predicting general mental health and exhaustion: the role of emotion and cognition components of personal and collective work-identity.
2018 (English)In: Heliyon, ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 4, no 8, article id e00735Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between emotion and cognition components of personal and collective work-identity and self-reported general mental health and exhaustion, in Swedish teachers (N = 768). In line with our predictions, we showed that the emotion component of personal work-identity and the cognition component of collective work-identity associated positively with general mental health and negatively with exhaustion. The reverse result was found, however, for the cognition component of personal work-identity and emotion component of collective work-identity. In general, all this indicates that person-work bonding might, to some degree, account for general mental health and exhaustion in employees. In particular, the findings suggest that general mental health and exhaustion may vary symmetrically across the: (1) Type of person-work bonding (personal vs. collective work-identity); and (2) Type of psychological component (emotion vs. cognition) involved in personal- and collective work-identity.

Keywords
Psychology
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27870 (URN)10.1016/j.heliyon.2018.e00735 (DOI)000443512800040 ()30140768 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85051641370 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-12-04Bibliographically approved
Nordhall, O., Knez, I. & Saboonchi, F. (2018). Teachers´personal work-identity predicts emotional exhaustion and work motivation: amediating role of job demands and resources. In: FALF KONFERENS 2018: Arbetet – problem eller potential för en hållbar livsmiljö?. Paper presented at FALF KONFERENS 2018, 10-12 juni 2018, Gävle. Gävle: Gävle University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teachers´personal work-identity predicts emotional exhaustion and work motivation: amediating role of job demands and resources
2018 (English)In: FALF KONFERENS 2018: Arbetet – problem eller potential för en hållbar livsmiljö?, Gävle: Gävle University Press , 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background

Teachers´ psychological job demands (large class sizes, low social support, and expectations to care for pupils, parents and colleagues) are positively related to their emotional exhaustion. Teachers´ psychological job resources (autonomy, mastery of skills, and experiences of their work as incentive and interesting) are positively related to work motivation and engagement, which can be defined as the positive antipode of emotional exhaustion. In addition, job demands and resources may, in general terms, explain the relationships between the employee and different work motivation- and mental illness outcomes.

Furthermore, teachers´ personal work-identity comprises cognitive- (coherence, correspondence, mental time, reflection, agency) and emotional- (attachment, belongingness, closeness) components, differently associated with various work-related outcomes. Our previous results show that the cognitive component positively relates to emotional exhaustion, and the emotional one positively relates to self-determined work motivation. These relationships have up to date not been theoretically and practically related to organizational/job characteristic factors, such as, job demands and resources.

 

Aims

Firstly, we investigated if a positive relationship between teachers´ cognitive personal work-identity and emotional exhaustion was mediated by psychological job demands. Secondly, we checked for if a positive relationship between teachers´ emotional personal work-identity and self-determined work motivation was mediated by psychological job resources.

Methods

768 members, representing eleven different local teachers´ trade unions, working in the south and middle part of Sweden replied to a digitized questionnaire measuring cognitive- and emotional components of personal work identity, job demands (prosocial extra-role performances) and resources (educational inspirations), emotional exhaustion and self-determined work motivation. Two mediation analyzes were performed by PROCESS macro for SPSS (version 2.16.3), model 4.

 

Results

A positive relationship between teachers´ cognitive personal work- identity and emotional exhaustion was mediated by psychological job demands: completely standardized indirect effects: β= .04, 95% CI [.0180, .0650].

Also, a positive relationship between teachers´ emotional personal work- identity and self-determined work motivation was positively mediated by psychological job resources: completely standardized indirect effect: β= .09, 95% CI [.0569, .1178].

This suggests that, when teachers think (cognitive component of work-identity) more of their work, they will be more emotionally exhausted, but when they feel (emotional component of work-identity) more of their work they will be more motivated to work. Psychological job demands and resources may however and to some extent explain these relationships, respectively.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Gävle: Gävle University Press, 2018
National Category
Work Sciences Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27331 (URN)978-91-88145-28-4 (ISBN)
Conference
FALF KONFERENS 2018, 10-12 juni 2018, Gävle
Available from: 2018-06-25 Created: 2018-06-25 Last updated: 2018-06-25Bibliographically approved
Knez, I. & Nordhall, O. (2017). Guilt as a motivator for moral judgment: An autobiographical memory study. Frontiers in Psychology, 8(May), Article ID 750.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Guilt as a motivator for moral judgment: An autobiographical memory study
2017 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 8, no May, article id 750Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim was to investigate the phenomenology of self-defining moral memory and its relations to self-conscious feelings of guilt and willingness to do wrong (moral intention) in social and economic moral situations. We found that people use guilt as a moral motivator for their moral intention. The reparative function of guilt varied, however, with type of situation; that is, participants felt guiltier and were less willing to do wrong in economic compared to social moral situations. The self-defining moral memory was shown to be relatively more easy to access (accessibility), logically structured (coherence), vivid, seen from the first-person perspective (visual perspective), real (sensory detail); but was relatively less positive (valence), emotionally intense, chronologically clear (time perspective), in agreement with the present self (distancing), and shared. Finally, it was indicated that the more guilt people felt the more hidden/denied (less accessible), but more real (more sensory details), the self-defining moral memory.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Research Foundation, 2017
Keywords
Autobiographical memory, Guil, t Moral intention, The self
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-24271 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00750 (DOI)000401285400001 ()28539906 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85019624613 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-06-15 Created: 2017-06-15 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Nordhall, O. & Agerström, J. (2013). Future-oriented people show stronger moral concerns. Current Research in Social Psychology, 21(6), 52-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Future-oriented people show stronger moral concerns
2013 (English)In: Current Research in Social Psychology, ISSN 1088-7423, E-ISSN 1088-7423, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 52-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous research has shown that moral concerns weigh more heavily when people are experimentally induced to think about the distant vs. near future. The current research demonstrates that this also applies to people whose thinking is intrinsically and generally oriented toward the future rather than the present. More specifically, we show that people with a future time perspective are more condemning of others who transgress ethical rules and that they are more committed to follow ethical rules themselves. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-19486 (URN)2-s2.0-84897934527 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-06-07 Created: 2015-06-07 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
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