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Cananau, Iulian, Dr.
Publications (10 of 15) Show all publications
Cananau, I. (2020). On the Path to Citizenship: A Conceptual Historicist Reading of Antebellum Women's Protest Literature. Orbis Litterarum, 75(1), 1-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the Path to Citizenship: A Conceptual Historicist Reading of Antebellum Women's Protest Literature
2020 (English)In: Orbis Litterarum, ISSN 0105-7510, E-ISSN 1600-0730, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This essay introduces a new approach to the history of pro‐ test literature, and to literary history writing in general. My case studies investigate three antebellum American works by women that express discontent with women’s condition: the “Declaration of Sentiments” of the Seneca Falls Convention (1848), Margaret Fuller’s Woman in the Nineteenth Century (1845), and Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (published in 1861, but written probably between 1852 and 1857). Drawing on Reinhart Koselleck’s theory and practice of conceptual history, the essay includes an analysis of the semantic field of citizenship in these works with an aim to explore the textual politics of their protest within the con‐ ceptual and ideological context of antebellum America.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2020
Keywords
antebellum America, citizenship, concepts, Koselleck, protest literature, womanhood
National Category
Specific Literatures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30914 (URN)10.1111/oli.12244 (DOI)000495173900001 ()2-s2.0-85074752032 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-11-10 Created: 2019-11-10 Last updated: 2020-01-23Bibliographically approved
Cananau, I. (2019). Toward a comparatist horizon in conceptual history [Review]. History of European Ideas, 45(1), 117-120
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Toward a comparatist horizon in conceptual history
2019 (English)In: History of European Ideas, ISSN 0191-6599, E-ISSN 1873-541X, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 117-120Article, book review (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
National Category
History of Ideas
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27587 (URN)10.1080/01916599.2018.1493307 (DOI)000476914900009 ()2-s2.0-85049807065 (Scopus ID)
Note

Recension av:

Conceptual history in the European space, edited by Willibald Steinmetz, Michael Freeden and Javier Fernández-Sebastián, New York and Oxford, Berghahn Books, 2017, 320 pp., $120.00/£85.00 (hardback), ISBN 978-1-78533-482-5

Available from: 2018-07-13 Created: 2018-07-13 Last updated: 2019-08-23Bibliographically approved
Cananau, I. (2019). Two Fictionalizations of American Populism: Edward Bellamy’s Looking Backward (1888) and Sinclair Lewis’s It Can’t Happen Here (1935). In: : . Paper presented at Populism, demokrati och humaniora, Högskolan i Gävle, 14-15 November 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Two Fictionalizations of American Populism: Edward Bellamy’s Looking Backward (1888) and Sinclair Lewis’s It Can’t Happen Here (1935)
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper discusses two best-selling fictional novels published at key moments in the history of American populism. The first one, Edward Bellamy’s Looking Backward 2000-1887, is a famous utopia and protest novel that helped crystalize the populist movement and exerted influence on the political agenda and organization of the People’s Party in the early 1890s. The other, It Can’t Happen Here, is a realist dystopia written by Nobel Prize laureate Sinclair Lewis in 1935, in an epoch marked by the successes and failures of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal and the rise of fascism and communism in the United States and abroad. It was also the time when the populist label had been extended to a special kind of left-wing political profile, one centered on the charismatic leader whose discourse and policies were tainted by demagoguery and authoritarianism. Huey P. Long, the colorful political boss from Louisiana, and Father Charles Coughlin, a Roman Catholic priest turned radio star from Detroit who spoke admiringly of Hitler and Mussolini, are prime examples of that species. Reading these two novels and reflecting over their relationship with populism may shed light on the transformation of the perception of American populism in its first fifty years of existence, from a progressive reform movement to an anti-democratic movement fueled by irrational resentments. In addition, approaching the history of American populism though these novels enables one to focus less on the “supply” side of populist politics (i.e. the populist leader and the populist party), as most analysts and commentators of populism do, and more on the “demand” side of it (i.e. the people/voters’ perception of and need for populist politics and politicians). Out of the many and often contradictory definitions of populism in political science, one will be selected, argued for and used throughout the essay.

National Category
Specific Literatures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-31350 (URN)
Conference
Populism, demokrati och humaniora, Högskolan i Gävle, 14-15 November 2019
Available from: 2019-12-20 Created: 2019-12-20 Last updated: 2020-01-07Bibliographically approved
Cananau, I. (2018). Between Womanhood and Citizenship: A Conceptual-Historicist Approach to Antebellum Women's Literature of Protest. In: : . Paper presented at The Joint 32nd European Association for American Studies & 63rd British Association for American Studies Conference (EBAAS 2018); London, UK; 4-7 April 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Between Womanhood and Citizenship: A Conceptual-Historicist Approach to Antebellum Women's Literature of Protest
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This study investigates the tension between the antebellum ideas of “womanhood” and “citizenship” as represented in three classic texts of women’s literature of protest: the “Declaration of Sentiments” of the Seneca Falls Convention, Margaret Fuller’s Woman in the Nineteenth Century, and Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. After a brief discussion of what is meant by “literature of protest” and the reasons why these texts belong to this category, I proceed to read them and their historical context following a method inspired by Reinhart Koselleck’s history of concepts (Begriffsgeschichte); I approach “womanhood” and “citizenship” as concepts whose semantic fields can and should be analyzed in their diachronic and synchronic dimensions. Here, however, I will focus on the latter, in an attempt to account for conflicts as well as commonalities between them.

National Category
Specific Literatures History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-28451 (URN)
Conference
The Joint 32nd European Association for American Studies & 63rd British Association for American Studies Conference (EBAAS 2018); London, UK; 4-7 April 2018
Available from: 2018-11-13 Created: 2018-11-13 Last updated: 2018-12-03Bibliographically approved
Cananau, I. (2018). "Partialist" and "Universalist": Figurations of U.S. Exceptionalism in Antebellum Writing. In: : . Paper presented at Open Covenants: Pasts and Futures of Global America, 10th Biennal Conference of the Swedish Association for American Studies; Stockholm University, Sweden; 28-30 September 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Partialist" and "Universalist": Figurations of U.S. Exceptionalism in Antebellum Writing
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this paper, I investigate the tension between particularism and universalism at the core of antebellum American exceptionalism. “Particularism” is herein understood as a broader term encompassing “nationalism”, “jingoism”, “sectarianism”, as well as “individualism” and “self-interest”.  As for “universalism”, it is conceived neither in theological terms as the doctrine that all people will be eventually saved, nor as a kind of foreign policy, but as virtually synonymous to “universality”, or the condition and quality of being universal. Taking my cues from one of Emerson’s famous paradoxes, namely that “every man is a partialist… and… every man is a universalist also” (in the essay “Nominalist and Realist”), I proceed to identify and compare representations of particularism and universalism in antebellum writings on U.S. national identity by Emerson, Fuller, Simms, Douglass, and Delany.

National Category
Specific Literatures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-28453 (URN)
Conference
Open Covenants: Pasts and Futures of Global America, 10th Biennal Conference of the Swedish Association for American Studies; Stockholm University, Sweden; 28-30 September 2018
Available from: 2018-11-13 Created: 2018-11-13 Last updated: 2018-12-03Bibliographically approved
Cananau, I. (2018). Toward a Methodology of Intuitive Critical Thinking in Literature Teaching. In: : . Paper presented at "Truth(s) and Alternative Facts", 20th Annual International Conference of the English Department of the University of Bucharest, Romania; 7-9 June 208.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Toward a Methodology of Intuitive Critical Thinking in Literature Teaching
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Literature has a special relation with truth. It often purports to reveal that there are many ways of conceiving truth, that indeed there is no absolute truth. Yet there are, in literature, notions of truth like the truth of the slave narratives and all of the so-called protest literature that resist relativization. In a sense, much of our work and expertise as literary scholars is to distinguish between claims to truth and to advance one claim against others through persuasive and valid arguments. To do that, we employ an ability to think critically that we have developed and trained as part of our professional identity. So embedded is this ability in the practice of literary studies that it might be considered exemplary for what theorists of critical thinking tentatively call “a way of being” and “a habit of the mind”. After a brief discussion of a few conceptualizations of truth in literature and literary studies, I present the notion of “intuitive critical thinking” and its possibilities for teaching literature in higher education, with a focus on the syllabi of some of my literature courses at the University of Gävle.

National Category
Didactics Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-28452 (URN)
Conference
"Truth(s) and Alternative Facts", 20th Annual International Conference of the English Department of the University of Bucharest, Romania; 7-9 June 208
Available from: 2018-11-13 Created: 2018-11-13 Last updated: 2018-12-03Bibliographically approved
Cananau, I. (2017). English-Language Literature Teaching and Democratic (Higher) Education. In: : . Paper presented at Litteraturstudiers betydelse för språkutbildning: litteraturdidaktiska perspektiv för ungdomsskola och högskola, 6-7 oktober 2017, Jönköping, Sverige.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>English-Language Literature Teaching and Democratic (Higher) Education
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Out of the values, norms, and practices that constitute the semantic field of democracy, this study hones in and reflects on those that are relevant for the goals and principles of higher education in the national context. Furthermore, the scope of this study is narrowed down to the teaching of English-language literature in Swedish institutions of higher education. Given the relatively high degree of autonomy that the teaching of literature has within the academic subject of English and the wide diversity of lecturers’ and professors’ research interests and backgrounds, it is important to account for the educators’ notions of, and attitudes toward, democratic education and democratic values as well as for the ways in which those values are reflected in their teaching practice. The main questions are: 1) Which norms, structures and practices are considered to foster democracy in higher education and which norms, structures and practices are considered real or potential challenges to democracy in higher education? 2) What specific advantages does the teaching of English-language literature have for democratic education? 3) How do the democratic values fare in the teaching practice (in objectives, content, assessment, as well as in the implementation and course/lesson design)? Empirical evidence will be gathered through semi-structured interviews with English-language literature faculty from several Swedish universities. Some partial results of this investigation, which is part of an on-going project, will be presented at the conference.

Keywords
democracy, Swedish higher education, English literature, teaching
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25586 (URN)
Conference
Litteraturstudiers betydelse för språkutbildning: litteraturdidaktiska perspektiv för ungdomsskola och högskola, 6-7 oktober 2017, Jönköping, Sverige
Available from: 2017-11-24 Created: 2017-11-24 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Cananau, I. (2017). Putting Context to New Use in Literary Studies: A Conceptual-Historicist Interpretation of Poe's 'Man of the Crowd'. Partial Answers, 15(2), 241-261
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Putting Context to New Use in Literary Studies: A Conceptual-Historicist Interpretation of Poe's 'Man of the Crowd'
2017 (English)In: Partial Answers, ISSN 1565-3668, E-ISSN 1936-9247, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 241-261Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Poe’s adherence to a strict aesthetic formalism used to be problematic for studies of the relationship between his work and its American context; the methodology of New Historicism has helped to surmount this problem but sometimes with excessive emphasis on socio-historical contexts. This essay examines critical practices at work in the interpretation of Poe’s canonical piece “The Man of the Crowd” in light of the recent debates in literary studies around the problem of context and contextualization in general and the “hegemony” of new historicism in particular. It then suggests an alternative method of reading literary texts and their contexts — one based on Reinhart Koselleck’s history of concepts. It offers an analysis of “The Man of the Crowd” as an illustration of this method.

Keywords
antebellum American literature, literary history, conceptual history, privacy, E. A. Poe, Reinhart Koselleck, context, new historicism, new formalism
National Category
General Literature Studies Specific Literatures History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-22540 (URN)000403032600003 ()2-s2.0-85020302154 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-10-04 Created: 2016-10-04 Last updated: 2018-12-03Bibliographically approved
Cananau, I. & Sims, C. (2017). Teaching Literature, Implementing Multicultural Education (1ed.). In: Ulrika Serrander & Peder Thalén (Ed.), Kunskap, motstånd, möjlighet: Humanistisk forskning i dag (pp. 297-316). Halmstad: Molin & Sorgenfrei
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teaching Literature, Implementing Multicultural Education
2017 (English)In: Kunskap, motstånd, möjlighet: Humanistisk forskning i dag / [ed] Ulrika Serrander & Peder Thalén, Halmstad: Molin & Sorgenfrei, 2017, 1, p. 297-316Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Halmstad: Molin & Sorgenfrei, 2017 Edition: 1
National Category
Specific Literatures Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25584 (URN)978-91-87515-99-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-11-24 Created: 2017-11-24 Last updated: 2018-11-13Bibliographically approved
Cananau, I. (2016). The Conversational Framework, Democratic Education, and Pedagogic Design in the American Literature Survey: A Case Study. In: : . Paper presented at SAAS 9th Biennial Conference, 30 September-1 October 2016, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Conversational Framework, Democratic Education, and Pedagogic Design in the American Literature Survey: A Case Study
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This presentation attempts to probe the applicability of Diana Laurillard’s “conversational” model of collaborative learning to the teaching of the American Literature Survey at the University of Gävle. For the purpose of exemplification, I have selected a unit on race and gender representations in late nineteenth-century fiction, with a focus on Mark Twain’s Pudd’nhead Wilson and Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s “The Yellow Wallpaper”, respectively. Given that the vast majority of students who take up this course are enrolled in the teacher training program, an important research question is how this pedagogic framework might contribute to developing and consolidating democratic values and practices in their future roles as high school teachers of English in Sweden. This aim converges with the curricular objective that civic values and attitudes should underpin the teaching of all subjects in the Swedish school system. The study is part of a project entitled “Democratic Vistas in the Classroom: Teaching American Literature in Swedish Higher Education”.

National Category
Didactics Learning Specific Literatures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-22542 (URN)
Conference
SAAS 9th Biennial Conference, 30 September-1 October 2016, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
Projects
Democratic Vistas in the Classroom: Teaching American Literature in Swedish Higher Education
Available from: 2016-10-04 Created: 2016-10-04 Last updated: 2018-11-13Bibliographically approved
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