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Thomas, Kavita Elisheba
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Publications (10 of 23) Show all publications
Thomas, K. E. (2018). Comparing Explicit Exemplar-Based and Rule-Based Corrective Feedback: Introducing Analogy-Based Corrective Feedback. The Modern language journal, 102(2), 371-391
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparing Explicit Exemplar-Based and Rule-Based Corrective Feedback: Introducing Analogy-Based Corrective Feedback
2018 (English)In: The Modern language journal, ISSN 0026-7902, E-ISSN 1540-4781, Vol. 102, no 2, p. 371-391Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study introduces an approach to providing corrective feedback to L2 learners termed analogy-based corrective feedback that is motivated by analogical learning theories and syntactic alignment in dialogue. Learners are presented with a structurally similar synonymous version of their output where the erroneous form is corrected, and they must decode the analogy-based feedback to understand the correction. A quasi-experimental classroom-based study was conducted with upper secondary Swedish EFL learners (N = 49) to investigate the effectiveness of corrective feedback varying in mode (inductive exemplar-based or deductive rule-based) on English subject-verb agreement. Explicit correction, metalinguistic, and analogy-based corrective feedback, all explicitly providing evidence of error and including reformulation prompts, were assessed by timed and untimed grammaticality judgment and sentence completion tasks in a between-groups pretest, posttest, delayed posttest design with a control group. Results indicate significant delayed gains for all feedback types on the untimed grammaticality judgment task for ungrammatical items. No clear advantage was seen for rule-based or exemplar-based CF. Descriptive statistics indicate different trends over successive testing times, where analogy-based feedback often led to lowest performance on the immediate posttest but showed improvement on the delayed posttest, unlike the other two CF types.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2018
Keywords
Analogical learning, Corrective feedback, Exemplars vs. rules, Explicit instruction, Interactive alignment, Prompts
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26240 (URN)10.1111/modl.12470 (DOI)000432035700007 ()2-s2.0-85042141879 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-15 Created: 2018-03-15 Last updated: 2018-06-05Bibliographically approved
Thomas, K. E. (2017). Reviewing Corrective Feedback Research in the Foreign Language Classroom (1ed.). In: Ulrika Serrander & Peder Thalén (Ed.), Kunskap Motstånd Möjlighet: Humanistisk forskning i dag (pp. 85-104). Halmstad: Molin & Sorgenfrei
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reviewing Corrective Feedback Research in the Foreign Language Classroom
2017 (English)In: Kunskap Motstånd Möjlighet: Humanistisk forskning i dag / [ed] Ulrika Serrander & Peder Thalén, Halmstad: Molin & Sorgenfrei, 2017, 1, p. 85-104Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Halmstad: Molin & Sorgenfrei, 2017 Edition: 1
National Category
Languages and Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25955 (URN)978-91-87515-99-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-01-08 Created: 2018-01-08 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Thomas, K. E. (2013). Investigation of Age-Differentiated Spatial Semantic Elaboration Strategies for Communicating Route Instructions. Universal Access in the Information Society, 12(2), 175-190
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigation of Age-Differentiated Spatial Semantic Elaboration Strategies for Communicating Route Instructions
2013 (English)In: Universal Access in the Information Society, ISSN 1615-5289, E-ISSN 1615-5297, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 175-190Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

 This paper investigates the effect of spatial semantic elaboration strategies on young and older participants' performance and preferences in a route drawing task where participants read route instructions and then drew the route on a map. In particular, an elaborated form of spatial perspective that communicated the route instruction in both egocentric and allocentric perspectives was compared against just the egocentric or allocentric perspective instructions individually.

Additionally, route instruction granularity was varied to compare elaborated hierarchical instructions which communicated goal and landmark information with flat instructions. The results of the experiment showed that older participants performed best with least confusion in the allocentric perspective with flat granularity, but that they benefited from semantic elaboration when less optimal spatial strategies were used, unlike young participants who performed best with the mixed (i.e., elaborated) perspective and flat granularity. The experiment showed that older participants actually suffered from what might be information overload when excess semantic elaboration was provided, as was likely the case with the use of the mixed perspective, which confused them considerably. In addition, hierarchical granularity was only beneficial in confusing spatial perspectives, while it detracted from older participants' performance in their optimal perspective, showing that there is a fine balance to be struck between beneficial semantic elaboration and information overload.

Keywords
older addressees, spatial language, route instructions, age differentiated strategies
National Category
Specific Languages Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-18227 (URN)10.1007/s10209-012-0274-z (DOI)000319434800004 ()2-s2.0-84878388010 (Scopus ID)
Projects
DiaSpace
Available from: 2014-12-01 Created: 2014-12-01 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Thomas, K. E., Noordzij, M. & Sripada, S. (2012). Atlas.txt: Exploring Linguistic Grounding Techniques for Communicating Spatial Information to Blind Users. Universal Access in the Information Society, 11(1), 85-98
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Atlas.txt: Exploring Linguistic Grounding Techniques for Communicating Spatial Information to Blind Users
2012 (English)In: Universal Access in the Information Society, ISSN 1615-5289, E-ISSN 1615-5297, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 85-98Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

 This paper describes exploratory research into automatically describing geo-referenced information to blind

people. The goal is to produce texts giving an overview describing the spatial layout, and a central concern of such texts

is that they employ an appropriate linguistic reference frame which enables blind hearers to ground the information. We

hypothesise that (1) directly perceivable reference frames are easier to ground and also that (2) spatial descriptions

drawn from composite reference frame systems composed of more than one reference frame are easier to ground. An

experiment exploring text comprehension on a range of texts employing different reference frame systems is presented.

The main results indicate that the second hypothesis is supported. A prototype of a natural language generation system

which generates texts describing geo-referenced information from data is described.

Keywords
blind users, geo-referenced spatial information, natural language generation, reference frame preference
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics Specific Languages Interaction Technologies Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-18225 (URN)10.1007/s10209-010-0217-5 (DOI)000300778300008 ()2-s2.0-84857690167 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Atlas.txt
Note

Funding agency: EPSRC  Grant number: EP/D052882/1

Available from: 2014-12-01 Created: 2014-12-01 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Thomas, K. E. & Andonova, E. (2012). Co-ordination of spatial perspectives in response to addressee feedback: Effects of perceived addressee understanding. Pragmatics and cognition, 20(3), 505-545
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Co-ordination of spatial perspectives in response to addressee feedback: Effects of perceived addressee understanding
2012 (English)In: Pragmatics and cognition, ISSN ISSN 0929-0907, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 505-545Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper we investigate the effect of level of understanding revealed by feedback in the form of clarification requests from a route follower on a route giver’s spatial perspective choice in their response in route instruction dialogues. In an experiment varying the level of understanding displayed by route follower clarification requests (the independent variable), route giver perspective switching in response to this feedback is investigated. Three levels of understanding displayed by feedback are investigated: (1) low-level clarification requests indicating that the instruction was not processed, (2) semantic-level clarification requests indicating that the spatial direction given in the instruction could not be resolved as the speaker of the clarification request could not interpret which perspective was intended, and (3) high-level feedback which indicates that the route giver’s instruction was understood but which note an obstacle to following the instruction. Results show that perspective choice, which is a conceptual feature of language use, is sensitive to perceived level of addressee understanding. We found that route givers consistently switch perspectives in responding to semantic-level clarification requests but not in response to low-level ones, and also that switching occurs more for high-level feedback than for low-level feedback. We address how dialogue systems can take advantage of these findings by modelling our results in an Information State model of dialogue, presenting update rules for response generation which account for our findings and also update rules which enable generation of the feedback themselves.

Keywords
co-ordination in dialogue, spatial language, feedback, dialogue modelling
National Category
Specific Languages Interaction Technologies Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-18230 (URN)10.1075/pc.20.3.04tho (DOI)000323562100004 ()2-s2.0-84878293757 (Scopus ID)
Projects
DiaSpace
Available from: 2014-12-01 Created: 2014-12-01 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Ross, R. J. & Thomas, K. E. (2010). An Empirically-based model for Perspective Selection in Route-Finding Dialogues. In: : . Paper presented at Spatial Cognition VII, International Conference, Spatial Cognition 2010, August 15-19, 2010, Mt. Hood/Portland, OR, USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Empirically-based model for Perspective Selection in Route-Finding Dialogues
2010 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Interaction Technologies Specific Languages
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-18244 (URN)
Conference
Spatial Cognition VII, International Conference, Spatial Cognition 2010, August 15-19, 2010, Mt. Hood/Portland, OR, USA
Available from: 2014-12-01 Created: 2014-12-01 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Tenbrink, T., Ross, R. J., Thomas, K. E., Dethlefs, N. & Andonova, E. (2010). Route instructions in map-based human–human and human–computer dialogue: A comparative analysis. Journal of Visual Languages and Computing, 21(5), 292-309
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Route instructions in map-based human–human and human–computer dialogue: A comparative analysis
Show others...
2010 (English)In: Journal of Visual Languages and Computing, ISSN 1045-926X, E-ISSN 1095-8533, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 292-309Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

When conveying information about spatial situations and goals, speakers adapt flexibly to their addressee in order to reach the communicative goal efficiently and effortlessly. Our aim is to equip a dialogue system with the abilities required for such a natural, adaptive dialogue. In this paper we investigate the strategies people use to convey route information in relation to a map by presenting two parallel studies involving human–human and human–computer interaction. We compare the instructions given to a human interaction partner with those given to a dialogue system which reacts by basic verbal responses and dynamic visualization of the route in the map. The language produced by human route givers is analyzed with respect to a range of communicative as well as cognitively crucial features, particularly perspective choice and references to locations across levels of granularity. Results reveal that speakers produce systematically different instructions with respect to these features, depending on the nature of the interaction partner, human or dialogue system. Our further analysis of clarification and reference resolution strategies produced by human route followers provides insights into dialogue strategies that future systems should be equipped with.

Keywords
Perspective Granularity Human–computer interaction Communicative strategies
National Category
Interaction Technologies Specific Languages
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-18228 (URN)10.1016/j.jvlc.2010.07.001 (DOI)000282035800005 ()2-s2.0-77956404115 (Scopus ID)
Projects
DiaSpace
Note

Funding agency: DFG  Grant number: SFB/TR 8

Available from: 2014-12-01 Created: 2014-12-01 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Thomas, K. E., Sumegi, L., Ferres, L. & Sripada, S. (2008). Enabling access to geo-referenced information : Atlas.txt. In: Proceedings of the 2008 international cross-disciplinary conference on Web accessibility (W4A): . Paper presented at W4A08 International Disciplinary Conference on Web Accessibility, 21 - 22 April 2008, Beijing, China (pp. 101-104). New York: ACM Digital Library
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enabling access to geo-referenced information : Atlas.txt
2008 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2008 international cross-disciplinary conference on Web accessibility (W4A), New York: ACM Digital Library, 2008, p. 101-104Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We present Atlas.txt, a novel data-to-text natural language generation system which enables access to geo-referenced information like online census data. We first discuss initial findings from an accessibility study on geo-referenced data and outline needs requirements for visually-impaired users of such data. We then present work towards realising our data-to-text system and indicate how it aims to address this issue.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: ACM Digital Library, 2008
Series
ICPS: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series
National Category
Specific Languages Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-18249 (URN)10.1145/1368044.1368066 (DOI)978-1-60558-153-8 (ISBN)
Conference
W4A08 International Disciplinary Conference on Web Accessibility, 21 - 22 April 2008, Beijing, China
Projects
Atlas.txt
Available from: 2014-12-01 Created: 2014-12-01 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Thomas, K. E. & Sripada, S. (2008). What's in a Message? Interpreting Geo-referenced Data for the Visually-impaired. In: Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Natural Language Generation 2008: INLG 2008. Paper presented at 5th International Conference on Natural Language Generation 2008, June 12-14, 2008, Salt Fork, Ohio, USA (pp. 113-120).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What's in a Message? Interpreting Geo-referenced Data for the Visually-impaired
2008 (English)In: Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Natural Language Generation 2008: INLG 2008, 2008, p. 113-120Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we describe content determination issues involved in the Atlas.txt project, which aims to automatically describe georeferenced information such as census data as text for the visually-impaired (VI). Texts communicating geo-referenced census information contain census data abstractions and their corresponding geographic references. Because visually impaired users find interpreting geographic references hard, we hypothesized that an introduction message about the underlying geography should help the users to interpret the geographic references easily. We performed user studies to design and evaluate the introduction message. An initial evaluation study with several sighted users and one partially sighted user showed that an introduction message is certainly preferred by most participants. Many of them used an introduction message themselves when they described maps textually. But the study also showed that the introduction message made no difference when the participants were asked to draw maps using the information in the textual descriptions.

Keywords
natural language generation, geo-referenced data, visually-impaired
National Category
Specific Languages Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-18268 (URN)
Conference
5th International Conference on Natural Language Generation 2008, June 12-14, 2008, Salt Fork, Ohio, USA
Projects
Atlas.txt
Available from: 2014-12-04 Created: 2014-12-04 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Thomas, K. E. & Sripada, S. (2007). Atlas.txt: Linking Geo-referenced Data to Text. In: Stephan Busemann (Ed.), Proceedings of the 11th European Workshop on Natural Language Generation (ENLG 07): . Paper presented at 11th European Workshop on Natural Language Generation (ENLG 07), 17{20 June 2007, Schloss Dagstuhl, Germany (pp. 163-166).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Atlas.txt: Linking Geo-referenced Data to Text
2007 (English)In: Proceedings of the 11th European Workshop on Natural Language Generation (ENLG 07) / [ed] Stephan Busemann, 2007, p. 163-166Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Geo-referenced data which are often communicated via maps are inaccessible to the visually impaired population. We summarise existing approaches to improving accessibility of geo-referenced data and present the Atlas.txt project which aims to produce textual summaries of such data which can be read out via a screenreader. We outline issues involved in generating descriptions of geo-referenced data and present initial work on content determination based on knowledge acquisition from both parallel corpus analysis and input from visually impaired people. In our corpus analysis we build an ontology containing abstract representations of expert-written sentences which we associate with macros containing sequences of data analysis methods. This helps us to identify which data analysis methods need to be applied to generate text from data.

National Category
Specific Languages Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-18248 (URN)
Conference
11th European Workshop on Natural Language Generation (ENLG 07), 17{20 June 2007, Schloss Dagstuhl, Germany
Available from: 2014-12-01 Created: 2014-12-01 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved

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