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Sjölander, Per
Publications (10 of 22) Show all publications
Kaiser, N., Sjölander, P., Liljegren, A. E., Jacobsson, L. & Renberg, E. S. (2010). Depression and anxiety in the reindeer-herding Sami population of Sweden. International Journal of Circumpolar Health, 69(4), 383-393
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Depression and anxiety in the reindeer-herding Sami population of Sweden
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2010 (English)In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 69, no 4, p. 383-393Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives. The objective of this study was to investigate symptoms and predicting factors of depression and anxiety among reindeer-herding Sami in Sweden. Study design. A total of 319 reindeer-herding Sami (168 men, 151 women) were compared with urban and rural reference populations comprising 1,393 persons (662 men, 731 women). Methods. A cross-sectional questionnaire study on mental health, which included the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Data were analysed with regard to population, gender, age group, education and work-related stress. Results. The Sami population disclosed higher mean values for both depression and anxiety than the reference groups, with Sami men reporting the highest rates. Work-related stress was associated with anxiety and depression in the Sami group. Conclusions. By comparing Sami men and women with reference groups of men and women living in urban and rural areas in northern Sweden, this study identified that reindeer-herding Sami men require special attention with regard to mental health problems.

Keywords
depression, anxiety, Sami, reindeer herding, Sweden
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-10269 (URN)10.3402/ijch.v69i4.17674 (DOI)000283705400009 ()20719108 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-78049341719 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-09-21 Created: 2011-09-21 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Ross, A. ., Johansson, Å., Vavruch-Nilsson, V., Hassler, S., Sjölander, P., Edin-Liljegren, A. & Gyllensten, U. (2009). Adherence to a traditional lifestyle affects food and nutrient intake among modern Swedish Sami. International Journal of Circumpolar Health, 68(4), 372-385
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adherence to a traditional lifestyle affects food and nutrient intake among modern Swedish Sami
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2009 (English)In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 68, no 4, p. 372-385Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives. To compare the nutrient and food intake of Sami still engaged in reindeer herding (traditional lifestyle or reindeer-herding Sami [RS]) and Sami not involved in reindeer herding (industrialized lifestyle or non-reindeer-herding Sami [NRS]) with other northern Swedish populations. Study design. Cross-sectional analysis of data from a prospective cardiovascular intervention program in northern Sweden. Methods. Data were used from a prospective cardiovascular intervention program in northern Sweden. Sami recruited into this study were divided according to whether they were involved in reindeer herding (traditional lifestyle, RS) (66 females, 79 males) or not (NRS) (255 females, 195 males), and compared to non-Sami from the same area taking part in the same study (controls) (499 females, 501 males). Subjects completed a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and clinical parameters were analysed. Results. RS had a higher overall intake of energy for both females (P<0.01) and males (P<0.05), but not total food intake compared to controls and NRS. The overall Sami diet was characterized by a higher proportion of energy from protein and fat. RS had a lower energy adjusted intake of vitamins A and E, and fibre, and a higher intake of sodium. RS and NRS both had a lower intake of vegetables and a higher intake of meat, and for RS, fish. Nutrient and food-intake patterns were similar for males and females. Conclusions. Classification of Sami into RS and NRS indicates that a traditional lifestyle defined by occupation is reflected in differences in food and nutrient intake.

Keywords
Sami, traditional diet, dietary intake, reindeer herding
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-5643 (URN)000271099600008 ()19917189 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-70349817305 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-10-14 Created: 2009-10-14 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Sjölander, P. (2009). Samernas hälsa och livssituation. In: Björngren Cuadra, Carin (Ed.), Omvårdnad i mångkulturell rum: frågor om kultur, etik och reflektion (pp. 181-212). Lund: Studentlitteratur
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Samernas hälsa och livssituation
2009 (Swedish)In: Omvårdnad i mångkulturell rum: frågor om kultur, etik och reflektion / [ed] Björngren Cuadra, Carin, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2009, p. 181-212Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2009
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-5602 (URN)978-91-44-05307-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Ineland, L., Jacobsson, L., Salander Renberg, E. & Sjölander, P. (2008). Attitudes towards mental disorders and psychiatric treatment: changes over time in a Swedish population. Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, 62(3), 192-197
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attitudes towards mental disorders and psychiatric treatment: changes over time in a Swedish population
2008 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 192-197Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Over the years a lot of research of attitudes towards mental disorders, towards people with mental illness and towards psychiatric services and treatment have shown a persistent negative attitude. There are, however, few studies on changes over time. The aim of this study was to compare responses to a questionnaire on attitudes towards mental disorders and psychiatric patients and the perception of psychiatric treatment in a community in northern Sweden in 1976 and 2003. In 1976 a random sample of 391 persons 18-70 years of age were asked and in 2003 a new sample of 500 persons from the same community were approached with the same questions. There are considerable changes over time. In 2003, almost 90% agree to the statement that mental illness harms the reputation more than physical illness, compared with 50% in 1976. In 2003, 51% agreed to the statement "Most people with mental disorders commit violent acts more than others" compared with 24% in 1976. There is an apparent ambivalence towards psychiatric treatment. Whilst 88% would advice a person with mental problems to contact a psychiatrist, still 26% would not like themselves to be referred to a psychiatrist. We argue that improving treatment methods is as important as changing attitudes through accurate information.

Keywords
Attitudes, Mental disorders, Psychiatric treatments, Stigma
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-1997 (URN)10.1080/08039480801962855 (DOI)000257583200004 ()2-s2.0-47949129268 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2008-11-07 Created: 2008-11-07 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Åsell, M., Sjölander, P., Kerschbaumer, H. & Djupsjöbacka, M. (2006). Are lumbar repositioning errors larger among patients with chronic low back pain compared with asymptomatic subjects?. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 87(9), 1170-1176
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are lumbar repositioning errors larger among patients with chronic low back pain compared with asymptomatic subjects?
2006 (English)In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 87, no 9, p. 1170-1176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To resolve the debate over whether lumbar repositioning acuity is reduced in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) by using a study design and methodology to minimize the effects of potential confounders. DESIGN: A single-blinded, controlled, multigroup comparative study.

SETTING: Vocational rehabilitation center.

PARTICIPANTS: Ninety-two patients with CLBP, divided into subgroups based on severity of symptoms and diagnostic characteristics. An age- and sex-matched group (n=31) of healthy subjects were the control. I

NTERVENTIONS: Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We measured repositioning errors (variable, constant) at 3 positions of the lumbar spine. Subjects were guided to a sitting target posture and asked to perform lumbar flexion before reproducing the target posture. Self-assessed pain, self-efficacy, and functional ability were addressed through questionnaires.

RESULTS: There were no differences in repositioning errors between the patients with CLBP or the subgroups of patients and the control group. We found only weak correlations between the repositioning errors and the self-reported data on functional disability, self-efficacy, and pain.

CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that sensorimotor dysfunctions in CLBP should be evaluated with methods other than repositioning tests in order to generate data relevant to the development of rational diagnostic methods and rehabilitation programs.

Keywords
Adult, Case-Control Studies, Chronic Disease, Female, Humans, Low Back Pain classification diagnosis physiopathology, Lumbosacral Region, Male, Posture, Questionnaires, Rehabilitation Centers, Severity of Illness Index, Single-Blind Method
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-2750 (URN)10.1016/j.apmr.2006.05.020 (DOI)000240407700002 ()16935050 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-33747782886 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2007-11-28 Created: 2007-11-28 Last updated: 2018-03-28Bibliographically approved
Hassler, S., Sjölander, P., Edin-Liljegren, A. & Daerga, L. (2006). Cancer in the Sami population of Sweden, 1961-2003: demographical aspects of different genetic and lifestyle exposure. In: The 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health. Paper presented at The 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, 12-16 Juni, 2006.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cancer in the Sami population of Sweden, 1961-2003: demographical aspects of different genetic and lifestyle exposure
2006 (English)In: The 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 2006Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Objectives: In previous Nordic studies it has been reported that the overall cancer incidence is lower among the Sami compared to the rest of the population living in the same area. But the relative risk varies among different Sami groups with a lower overall risk among reindeer herders compared to other Sami groups. Diet and lifestyle factors such as physical activity has been suggested to explain these differences together with genetical factors. The objective of this study is to describe the cancer incidence among different Sami groups in Sweden between 1961 and 2003 and to evaluate the effect of demographical changes on risk factors related to Sami lifestyle and heritage.

Study Design: Prospective cohort study

Methods: The study cohort constitutes of a total of 7 482 reindeer herders and 34 239 non-herders from which subgroups were genealogically defined, carrying with them assumptions of different levels of influence of a traditional Sami life style. Follow up was from 1961 to 2003 and standard incidence ratios (SIR) were calculated using a demographically matched control population as the standard of comparison.

Results:Overall lower cancer risk was observed for reindeer herding men compared to the control population while the relative risk for non-herding women was significantly higher. Significantly lower rates of prostate was observed among reindeer herders and higher rates of stomach and ovary was observed among non-herding women.

Conclusions: Protective factors in an active, more traditional life style in combination with genertical factors is suggested to explain the lower cancer rates among reindeer herding men. An assumption of declining protective influence of a traditional life style in different Sami groups is supported by an demographical and genealogical analysis of the constitution of different Sami groups. It is indicated that demographical changes resulting in various levels of integration and/or assimilation should be considered when analysing the health status of the Sami.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-1299 (URN)
Conference
The 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, 12-16 Juni, 2006
Available from: 2008-02-01 Created: 2008-02-01 Last updated: 2018-03-28Bibliographically approved
Daerga, L., Edin–Liljegren, A., Sjölander, P. & Hassler, S. (2006). Occupational musculoskeletal dysfunctions among reindeer herding Sami in Sweden. In: Vaartoe: Sami research in the future. Paper presented at Vaartoe - Sami research in the future, Jokkmokk, 21-23 August, 2006.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupational musculoskeletal dysfunctions among reindeer herding Sami in Sweden
2006 (English)In: Vaartoe: Sami research in the future, 2006Conference paper, Published paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

Objectives: In a previous pilot studies it was indicated that the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain (MSP) is high among reindeer herders. The main objective of the present study was to explore potential relations between self-reported MSP, perceived dysfunction and quality of life among Swedish reindeer herding Sami, with particular emphasis on gender comparisons.

Study Design: Cross-sectional, semi-randomised, cohort study.

Methods: A total of 154 reindeer herders (86 men, 68 women) were offered participation in the study. They were semi-randomly selected from 7 Sami communities and represented herders who were older than 18 years of age, and belonged to households where reindeer husbandry constituted a major source of income. They answered questionnaire on pain intensity, duration and frequency in 10 separate body regions, on functional disturbances (SF-36 and Neck Disability Index), and on quality of life (in four domains - physical, social, mental and health). The questionnaires were distributed via mail to complement clinical data acquired during health examination executed by physiotherapists and GPs.

Results: Preliminary analyses revealed a high prevalence of MSP, particularly of the back, neck, shoulder, elbows and wrists, both among men and women. Significant functional impairments and poor quality of life were reported by a majority of the participants.

Conclusions: Detailed results and general conclusions will be presented at the conference

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-1297 (URN)
Conference
Vaartoe - Sami research in the future, Jokkmokk, 21-23 August, 2006
Available from: 2008-02-01 Created: 2008-02-01 Last updated: 2018-03-28Bibliographically approved
Edin-Liljegren, A., Hassler, S., Sjölander, P. & Daerga, L. (2006). Psychosocial risk factors among Sami in Sweden: a controlled cohort study. In: Vaartoe: Sami research in the future. Paper presented at Vaartoe - Sami research in the future, Jokkmokk, 21-23 August, 2006.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychosocial risk factors among Sami in Sweden: a controlled cohort study
2006 (English)In: Vaartoe: Sami research in the future, 2006Conference paper, Published paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

Objective: To investigate the occurrence of psychosocial, clinical and behavioural risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) among reindeer herding and non-reindeer herding Sami. The results on psychosocial risk factors are presented here.

Materials and Methods: A cohort of 611 Swedish Sami (276 men and 335 women) was constructed from national population registers and compared with a twice as large control population of non-Sami, matched by age, gender and area of residency. Information on quality of life, social support and Karasek and Theorell`s job-strain indices was obtained from a database containing information from a regional CVD-preventive program. The data was collected from the period of 1990–2001.

Results: The Sami people reported lower quality of life and higher demand and intellectual discretion at work than the non-Sami. The Sami women, the reindeer herding as well as the non-reindeer herding, had lower scores on intellectual discretion and social support at work compared with the Sami men.

Conclusions: Regarding the psychosocial risk factors investigated here it seems that the Sami women are at higher risk than the Sami men.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-1296 (URN)
Conference
Vaartoe - Sami research in the future, Jokkmokk, 21-23 August, 2006
Available from: 2008-02-01 Created: 2008-02-01 Last updated: 2018-03-28Bibliographically approved
Daerga, L., Hassler, S., Edin-Liljegren, A. & Sjölander, P. (2005). Arbetsrelaterade dödsolyckor och belastningsskador bland renskötande samer. In: Glesbygdsmedicinska föreningens årsmöte, Arvidsjaur. Paper presented at Glesbygdsmedicinska föreningens årsmöte, Arvidsjaur 14/4 2005.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Arbetsrelaterade dödsolyckor och belastningsskador bland renskötande samer
2005 (Swedish)In: Glesbygdsmedicinska föreningens årsmöte, Arvidsjaur, 2005Conference paper, Published paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-1225 (URN)
Conference
Glesbygdsmedicinska föreningens årsmöte, Arvidsjaur 14/4 2005
Available from: 2008-02-06 Created: 2008-02-06 Last updated: 2018-03-28Bibliographically approved
Hassler, S., Johansson, R., Sjölander, P., Grönberg, H. & Damber, L. (2005). Causes of death in the Sami population of Sweden, 1961-2000.. International Journal of Epidemiology, 34(3), 623-629
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Causes of death in the Sami population of Sweden, 1961-2000.
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2005 (English)In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 623-629Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Indigenous people often have a pattern of mortality that is disadvantageous in comparison with the general population. The knowledge on causes of death among the Sami, the natives of northern Scandinavia, is limited. The aim of the present study was to compare gender and cause specific mortality patterns for reindeer herding Sami, non-herding Sami, and non-Sami between 1961 and 2000. METHODS: A Sami cohort was constructed departing from a group of index-Sami identified as either reindeer herding Sami or Sami eligible to vote for the Sami parliament. Relatives of index-Sami were identified in the National Kinship Register and added to the cohort. The cohort contained a total of 41 721 people (7482 reindeer herding Sami and 34 239 non-herding Sami). A demographically matched non-Sami reference population four times as large, was compiled in the same way. Relative mortality risks were analysed by calculating standardized mortality ratios (SMRs). RESULTS: The differences in overall mortality and life expectancy of the Sami, both reindeer herding and non-herding, compared with the reference population were relatively small. However, Sami men showed significantly lower SMR for cancers but higher for external causes of injury. For Sami women, significantly higher SMR was found for diseases of the circulatory system and diseases of the respiratory system. An increased risk of dying from subarachnoid haemorrhage was observed among both Sami men and women. CONCLUSIONS: The similarities in mortality patterns are probably a result of centuries of close interaction between the Sami and the non-Sami, while the observed differences might be due to lifestyle, psychosocial and/or genetic factors.

Keywords
Adolescent, Adult, Age Distribution, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Cardiovascular Diseases mortality, Cause of Death, Child, Child, Preschool, Cohort Studies, Ethnic Groups, Female, Humans, Infant, Life Expectancy, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasms mortality, Respiratory Tract Diseases mortality, Sex Distribution, Sweden epidemiology ethnology, Wounds and Injuries mortality
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-2857 (URN)10.1093/ije/dyi027 (DOI)000229902000021 ()15737965 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-11-28 Created: 2007-11-28 Last updated: 2018-03-28Bibliographically approved
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