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Lampic, Claudia
Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Mårtensson, G., Carlsson, M. & Lampic, C. (2010). Are cancer patients whose problems are overestimated by nurses less satisfied with their care?. European Journal of Cancer Care, 19(3), 382-392
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are cancer patients whose problems are overestimated by nurses less satisfied with their care?
2010 (English)In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 382-392Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The main aim of the present study was to investigate whether patient-nurse dis/agreement concerning cancer patients' situation was of importance to patients' satisfaction with care. Another aim was to describe cancer patients' satisfaction with care and to investigate its relationship to cancer patients' emotional distress. A consecutive sample of individual patient-nurse pairs (n = 82) was recruited and followed during 3 days. Each pair consisted of a cancer patient newly admitted to an oncological/haematological ward and a nurse responsible for that patient's care. The known phenomenon of nurse overestimation of cancer patients' problems did not appear to be of importance to patients' satisfaction with care. However, patients whose depressive problems were underestimated by nurses were significantly less satisfied with the care they received. Furthermore, anxious and depressed patients were less satisfied with some aspects of the care they received than were the remaining patients. Although the patients' ratings and experiences of received care indicated a high degree of satisfaction, the patients also expressed negative experiences of care. To improve the quality of cancer care, nurses need to improve their ability to identify cancer patients' emotional distress if they are to satisfy patients' needs.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-5320 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2354.2009.01070.x (DOI)000276696000017 ()19686271 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-09-07 Created: 2009-09-07 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Mårtensson, G., Carlsson, M. & Lampic, C. (2010). Do oncology nurses provide more care to patients with high levels of emotional distress?. Oncology Nursing Forum, 37(1), E34-E42
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do oncology nurses provide more care to patients with high levels of emotional distress?
2010 (English)In: Oncology Nursing Forum, ISSN 0190-535X, E-ISSN 1538-0688, Vol. 37, no 1, p. E34-E42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose/Objectives: To investigate nurses' planning and implementation of individualized patient care in relation to patients' emotional distress as assessed by nurses and whether nurses and patients perceived the implemented care in a similar manner. Design: Prospective, comparative. Setting: Five oncologic-hematologic wards in Sweden. Sample: 90 individual nurse-patient pairs were recruited and 81 were intact after three consecutive days. Each pair consisted of a patient with cancer and a nurse responsible for that patient's care. Methods: Nurse-patient pairs were followed using questionnaires. Outcome measures were nurses' identification of patients' emotional distress, care planning, and nursepatient ratings of implemented care. Main Research Variables: Patients' emotional distress andnurses' implemented care. Findings: Nurses identified a variety of emotional issuesamong patients and planned individual nursing interventions. Nurse and patient perceptions of implemented care demonstrated weak correlations for individually planned interventions and nurses' general caring behavior. With one exception, nurse self-reports did not indicate any differences in nurses' caring behavior directed to more and less distressed patients. Nurses reported providing comfort more frequently to patients with high levels of emotional distress, but this was not substantiated in patients' ratings. Conclusions: Nurses showed an intention to provide individualized care. However, with one exception, nurses did not report providing more care to patients with cancer with high levels of emotional distress than to less distressed patients. Implications for Nursing: To ensure individualized care, nurses in cancer care should closely validate the accuracy of their interpretation of patients' needs and their planning of care in collaboration with the patients.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-6474 (URN)10.1188/10.ONF.E34-E42 (DOI)20044330 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-77949321510 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-03-03 Created: 2010-03-03 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Mårtensson, G., Carlsson, M. & Lampic, C. (2010). Is nurse-patient agreement of importance to cancer nurses satisfaction with care?. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 66(3), 573-582
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is nurse-patient agreement of importance to cancer nurses satisfaction with care?
2010 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 573-582Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-6758 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2648.2009.05228.x (DOI)000274411300011 ()20423392 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-03-03 Created: 2010-03-03 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Lampic, C., Skoog Svanberg, A. & Sydsjö, G. (2009). Attitudes towards gamete donation among IVF doctors in the Nordic countries - are they in line with national legislation?. Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics, 26(5), 231-238
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attitudes towards gamete donation among IVF doctors in the Nordic countries - are they in line with national legislation?
2009 (English)In: Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics, ISSN 1058-0468, E-ISSN 1573-7330, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 231-238Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To compare attitudes towards gamete donation between IVF doctors in the Nordic countries, and to determine whether attitudes are in correspondence with national legislation. Materials and methods: A study-specific questionnaire was used to study attitudes of 108 IVF doctors (92% response). Participants constituted 78% of all IVF doctors in Sweden, Denmark and Norway and 15% of IVF doctors in Finland. Results: Despite similar legislation regarding offspring right to learn his/her donor's identity, IVF doctors from Norway reported significantly more negative attitudes towards disclosure than did Swedish physicians. A majority from all countries demonstrated positive attitudes towards embryo donation and allowing sperm donation for lesbian couples. Physicians reported strong support for anonymous donation but less support for 'known' donation. Conclusion: There are discrepancies between IVF doctors' attitudes towards gamete donation and national legislation in four Nordic countries. Negative attitudes towards disclosure to offspring may counteract legislative intentions.

Keywords
Attitude of health personnel; Heterologous artificial insemination; Legislation as topic; Oocyte donation; Physicians
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-5364 (URN)10.1007/s10815-009-9311-0 (DOI)000268544800001 ()19472047 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-70349593718 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-09-08 Created: 2009-09-08 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Hayat Roshanai, A., Rosenquist, R., Lampic, C. & Nordin, K. (2009). Cancer genetic counselees' self-reported psychological distress, changes in life, and adherence to recommended surveillance programs 3-7 years post counseling.. Journal of Genetic Counseling, 18(2), 185-94
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cancer genetic counselees' self-reported psychological distress, changes in life, and adherence to recommended surveillance programs 3-7 years post counseling.
2009 (English)In: Journal of Genetic Counseling, ISSN 1059-7700, E-ISSN 1573-3599, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 185-94Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to investigate psychological distress, changes in life, adherence to surveillance programs and satisfaction with cancer genetic counseling based on Swedish participants' self-reported data. A total of 218 probands (72% response rate) affected by breast, breast/ovarian or colorectal cancer and/or a family history of cancer were surveyed 3-7 years after receiving cancer genetic counseling. Participants reported a relatively high level of anxiety and a low level of depression. Probands affected by colorectal cancer reported a higher level of depression than did non-affected individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer. Overall, the participants reported moderate changes in family relations, priorities and appreciation of daily life activities. The majority of at-risk probands reportedly adhered to recommended surveillance programs. The mean level of satisfaction with cancer genetic counseling was high. About half of the participants would have accepted additional counseling sessions, contact with a psychologist or further help concerning informing family members. The present results indicate no adverse effects of genetic counseling, but they do suggest that typical counseling procedures could be improved by provision of additional psychosocial support.

Keywords
Adherence; Cancer genetic counseling; Changes in life; Hereditary cancer; Psychological distress
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-5342 (URN)10.1007/s10897-008-9203-y (DOI)000267257500012 ()19212811 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-62449216260 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-09-07 Created: 2009-09-07 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Roshanai, A. H., Rosenquist, R., Lampic, C. & Nordin, K. (2009). Does enhanced information at cancer genetic counseling improve counselees knowledge, risk perception, satisfaction and negotiation of information to at-risk relatives?: a randomized study. Acta Oncologica, 48(7), 999-1009
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does enhanced information at cancer genetic counseling improve counselees knowledge, risk perception, satisfaction and negotiation of information to at-risk relatives?: a randomized study
2009 (English)In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 48, no 7, p. 999-1009Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose. The aim of the present randomized intervention study was to investigate the effect of receiving extended cancer genetic information on counselees' knowledge, risk perception, information sharing and satisfaction with the service. Methods. In total, 147 counselees, affected by cancer and/or a family history of cancer, were randomized to extended or standard information. The levels of counselees' knowledge and personal risk estimations were measured at four time points. In addition, counselees' satisfaction with the counseling and sharing of the information to at-risk relatives was assessed. The intervention included meeting a specialist nurse, learning the breaking bad news method, receiving written material and video-taped counseling sessions. Results. A significant increase in the level of knowledge in participants in the "breast cancer group" regardless of the randomization was observed over time. The correct estimation of personal risk increased significantly in both groups after two weeks, but declined at the eight month follow-up. Most of the participants had informed at-risk relatives about their visit at the cancer genetic clinic. The majority of respondents in both groups were highly satisfied with the counseling. The only observed effects of the intervention were that counselees in the intervention group were significantly more satisfied with the content of the given information and with the way of informing relatives. Conclusion. Apparently, the current genetic counseling is managed properly and extended information does not seem necessary in all cases. However, some counselees need additional sessions.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-5341 (URN)10.1080/02841860903104137 (DOI)000271228400008 ()19636983 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-70350071007 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-09-07 Created: 2009-09-07 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Fröjd, C., Lampic, C., Larsson, G. & von Essen, L. (2009). Is satisfaction with doctors' care related to health-related quality of life, anxiety and depression among patients with carcinoid tumours?: A longitudinal report. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 23(1), 107-116
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is satisfaction with doctors' care related to health-related quality of life, anxiety and depression among patients with carcinoid tumours?: A longitudinal report
2009 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 107-116Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate (i) whether specific aspects of the initial consultation (IC) and/or patients' satisfaction with doctors' care are related to health-related quality of life (HRQoL), anxiety and depression among patients with carcinoid tumours and (ii) whether patients' satisfaction with doctors' care changes over time. The study has a longitudinal design. The HRQoL and psychosocial function among patients who met the doctors showing good ability to identify patients' worry and wish for information were compared with those patients who met doctors showing less good ability. Patients' HRQoL, anxiety, depression and satisfaction with doctors' care were assessed longitudinally, shortly after each of the first four admissions to specialist care. Patients who met doctors showing good ability to identify their wish for information at the IC reported higher levels of cognitive function. Higher satisfaction with doctors' care was related to higher emotional and cognitive function, to higher global QoL, and to lower levels of problems with diarrhoea, financial difficulties, constipation, anxiety and depression shortly after each of the first three admissions, although not after the fourth admission to the specialist care. Although most patients with carcinoid tumours report high satisfaction with care, it is important to be aware of the fact that some patients may be less satisfied. Doctors should provide patients with information which matches the individual patients' needs and preferences as patients' satisfaction with doctors' provision of information is related to patients' HRQoL, anxiety and depression.

Keywords
nxiety; Carcinoid tumours; Care; Depression; Health-related quality of life; Information; Satisfaction
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-1687 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2008.00596.x (DOI)000263466900013 ()19250453 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-60449113990 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2008-05-12 Created: 2008-05-12 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Sundberg, K., Lampic, C., Björk, O., Arvidsson, J. & Wettergren, L. (2009). Positive and negative consequences of childhood cancer influencing the lives of young adults. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 13(3), 164-170
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Positive and negative consequences of childhood cancer influencing the lives of young adults
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2009 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 164-170Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to describe how young adults who have survived childhood cancer consider their present life to be influenced by the cancer experience. A cohort of 246 long-term survivors were approached a median of 16 years after diagnosis. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted based on the Swedish version of the Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life-Direct Weighting (SEIQoL-DW). Interviews were analysed using content analyses. When asked if cancer negatively or positively currently affected their lives, 68% reported at least one negative consequence and 53% at least one positive consequence. The most frequently reported negative consequences include a variety of physical impairments and limitations in participating in activities; positive consequences describe a more positive view of life and of self. Women more often than men reported negative psychological impact, a changed body appearance and positive interaction with others. CNS tumours and combined treatment were somewhat associated to a higher extent of negative consequences. Overall, the results indicate that long-term survivors of childhood cancer are getting along quite well despite shortcomings.

Keywords
Adolescent; Content analysis; Interview; Long-term; Paediatric malignancies; Quality of life; SEIQoL-DW; Survivors
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-1688 (URN)10.1016/j.ejon.2008.05.009 (DOI)000269426000005 ()18842454 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-67849121211 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2008-05-12 Created: 2008-05-12 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Mårtensson, G., Carlsson, M. & Lampic, C. (2008). Agreement between cancer patients' and nurses' perceptions of patients' emotional distress, coping resources and quality of life. Paper presented at 10th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology, Madrid, Spain, 9-13 June 2008. Psycho-Oncology, 17, S95-S95
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Agreement between cancer patients' and nurses' perceptions of patients' emotional distress, coping resources and quality of life
2008 (English)In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 17, p. S95-S95Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-5322 (URN)10.10002/pon (DOI)000257874200178 ()
Conference
10th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology, Madrid, Spain, 9-13 June 2008
Available from: 2009-09-07 Created: 2009-09-07 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Skoog Svanberg, A., Sydsjö, G., Ekholm Selling, K. & Lampic, C. (2008). Attitudes towards gamete donation among Swedish gynaecologists and obstetricians. Human Reproduction, 23(4), 904-911
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attitudes towards gamete donation among Swedish gynaecologists and obstetricians
2008 (English)In: Human Reproduction, ISSN 0268-1161, E-ISSN 1460-2350, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 904-911Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Assisted reproductive technology (ART) legislation in Sweden has undergone a gradual transformation from being fairly restrictive when first introduced to becoming more permissive in recent years. Regarding gamete donation, Sweden became the first country to pass legislation about disclosure by establishing a child's right to find out the identity of the gamete donor once the child has reached maturity. Our aim was to investigate attitudes towards gamete donation among Swedish gynaecologists and obstetricians. METHODS: A questionnaire was mailed to all gynaecologists and obstetricians listed from a commercial register of all working in Sweden. Among 1230 eligible gynaecologists/obstetricians, 854 (69%) answered the questionnaire. RESULTS: In general, the majority of Swedish gynaecologists/obstetricians had positive attitudes towards gamete donation. Although a majority advocated openness regarding informing the child that he or she was conceived by making use of gamete donation, ∼40% opposed allowing the child to receive any information about the donor when the child has reached maturity. Even though Swedish legislation has allowed sperm donation to lesbian couples since July 2005, one-third of the gynaecologists/obstetricians opposed donation to lesbians. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that the gynaecologists'/obstetricians' negative attitudes towards disclosure may influence patients' ability to discuss their thoughts and feelings about donation. This may also have a negative impact on donor recruitment as well as on the extent of methods made accessible within ART. © The Author 2008. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology.

Keywords
Attitudes; Disclosure; Donation; Fertility; Gynaecologists
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-1685 (URN)10.1093/humrep/dem416 (DOI)000255555100025 ()18258766 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-43249111836 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2008-06-12 Created: 2008-06-12 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
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