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Andersson, Hanna
Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Wallhagen, M., Sörqvist, P., Holmgren, M. & Andersson, H. (2019). Brister i vårt logiska tänkande ett hinder för klimatkloka beslut. Husbyggaren (1), 23-25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Brister i vårt logiska tänkande ett hinder för klimatkloka beslut
2019 (Swedish)In: Husbyggaren, ISSN 0018-7968, no 1, p. 23-25Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Building Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29458 (URN)
Available from: 2019-04-12 Created: 2019-04-12 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Holmgren, M., Andersson, H. & Sörqvist, P. (2018). Averaging bias in environmental impact estimates: Evidence from the negative footprint illusion. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 55, 48-52
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Averaging bias in environmental impact estimates: Evidence from the negative footprint illusion
2018 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 55, p. 48-52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper we argue that unsustainable behaviors often stem from a common averaging bias when people estimate the environmental impact of a set of environmentally friendly and less friendly objects or actions. In Experiment 1, we show that people believe that the total carbon footprint of a category of items (a community of buildings in this case) is lower, rather than higher, when environmentally friendly (“green” buildings) items are added to the category, a negative footprint illusion. Experiment 2 showed  that the carbon footprint estimate assigned to a category with a mix of environmentally friendly and less friendly objects (“green” and conventional  buildings) is the average of its subsets (the “green” buildings and the  conventional buildings, respectively), an averaging bias. A similar averaging  process may underpin estimates of the environmental impact of people's own actions, explaining why people believe that environmentally friendly actions can compensate for less friendly actions.

Keywords
“Green” buildings, Averaging bias Carbon footprint, The negative footprint illusion
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25882 (URN)10.1016/j.jenvp.2017.12.005 (DOI)000428489200006 ()2-s2.0-85038968856 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-12-20 Created: 2017-12-20 Last updated: 2020-02-19Bibliographically approved
Holmgren, M., Andersson, H., Marsh, J. E. & Bell, L. J.Eliminating the Negative Footprint Illusion by Fostering a Summative Mindset using a Transfer Paradigm.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eliminating the Negative Footprint Illusion by Fostering a Summative Mindset using a Transfer Paradigm
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

People’s belief that an environmentally friendly item that is added to a set of conventional items has the ability to reduce the total environmental impact of these items could lead to unwanted environmental consequences. An averaging bias seems to underpin this negative footprint illusion: people make their estimates based on the average of the environmental impact produced by the items rather than their accumulative sum. We report a study using a problem-solving transfer paradigm to explore if this preoccupation to think in terms of an average can be eliminated by fostering a summative mindset. The results demonstrate that, participants can correctly estimate that environmental impact will increase when a “green” car is added to a set of petrol cars, but only when this task is preceded by a task that engenders a summation judgment. Our evidence indicates that the negative footprint illusion can be tempered by problem-solving transfer whereby a primed concept (summation) is used adaptively on subsequent judgments, thereby correcting for bias in environmental judgments.    

Keywords
negative footprint illusion; averaging bias; problem-solving transfer; priming
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-31919 (URN)
Available from: 2020-02-19 Created: 2020-02-19 Last updated: 2020-02-21Bibliographically approved
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