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Eriksson, E., Wejåker, M., Danhard, A., Nilsson, A. & Kristofferzon, M.-L. (2019). Living with a spouse with chronic illness – the challenge of balancing demands and resources. BMC Public Health, 19(1), Article ID 422.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Living with a spouse with chronic illness – the challenge of balancing demands and resources
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2019 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 422Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objectives. To describe the partners’ experiences of living with a person with chronic illness and how they manage everyday life.

Background. The number of partners providing informal care for their chronically ill spouse is rising, and they describe their daily life as demanding.

Design. A descriptive design with a qualitative approach was used.   

Methods. A purposive sample of 16 partners with a chronically ill spouse were interviewed. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

Results Four main themes were identified: ‘Living with challenges caused by the spouse's disease,’ ‘Seeking support for living with the spouse’s illness,’ ‘Appreciating the good parts of life’ and ‘Adapting to constant changes and an uncertain future.’ The participants rated their health as rather good and had great confidence in their own ability to cope with daily life. Their experiences of support from formal care providers varied; they expressed the need for more assistance from the health care sector.

Conclusions. The partners experienced many challenges in everyday life when providing informal care for their chronically ill spouse. This affected both their physical and psychological health, as they had limited time for themselves. The partners seemed to receive more support from their informal network than from formal care providers. In handling daily life, the partners balanced demands and resources to identify possibilities to move forward and find meaning in life.

Relevance to clinical practice. Formal care providers must acknowledge partners' needs, develop evidence-based assessment guidelines, and provide efficient support to partners with a chronically ill spouse. 

Keywords
chronic illness, partner, resources, formal care, daily life
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25800 (URN)10.1186/s12889-019-6800-7 (DOI)000465429300005 ()31014309 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85064811879 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-12-14 Created: 2017-12-14 Last updated: 2019-08-22Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, E., Berg, S. & Engström, M. (2018). Internationally educated nurses' and medical graduates' experiences of getting a license and practicing in Sweden - a qualitative interview study. BMC Medical Education, 18(1), Article ID 296.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internationally educated nurses' and medical graduates' experiences of getting a license and practicing in Sweden - a qualitative interview study
2018 (English)In: BMC Medical Education, ISSN 1472-6920, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 296Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The Swedish healthcare system has an increased need for nurses and physicians, and the number of International Educated Nurses (IENs) and International Medical Graduates (IMGs) seeking job opportunities and a license to practice in Sweden is rising. This study explored how IENs and IMGs describe their experience of getting a license to practice, their perceptions of working in Sweden and of how their intercultural competence is utilized.

METHOD: A qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews with 11 IENs and 11 IMGs. The interviews were conducted between 2015 and 2017. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

RESULTS: Three main themes were identified: 'Getting a license - a different story,' 'The work is familiar, yet a lot is new,' 'Trying to master a new language.' The time to obtain a license to practice and finding a job was shorter for IENs and IMGs coming from European countries than for those from non-European countries. Some of the experiences of getting a license to practice and of entering a new workplace in another country were the same for nurses and physicians. In general, both IENs and IMGs felt welcomed and used their intercultural competence at work. Lack of language skills was regarded as the main problem for both professions, while workplace introduction was shorter for IMGs than for IENs.

CONCLUSIONS: Problems related to language and culture are often underestimated, therefore organizations and managers employing IENs and IMGs should provide longer workplace introduction to facilitate the acculturation process. More time-efficient language courses specifically adapted to IENs and IMGs could make the transition easier and shorten the time to obtain a license to practice for both professions.

Keywords
IEN, IMG, Intercultural competence, License, Work experience
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-28787 (URN)10.1186/s12909-018-1399-4 (DOI)000452276600002 ()30518350 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85058542208 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-10 Created: 2018-12-10 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, E. & Engström, M. (2018). Internationally educated nurses’ descriptions of their access to structural empowerment while working in another country’s health care context. Journal of Nursing Management, 26(7), 866-873
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internationally educated nurses’ descriptions of their access to structural empowerment while working in another country’s health care context
2018 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 866-873Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM:

To examine internationally educated nurses' experiences of empowerment structures using Kanter's theory of structural empowerment.

BACKGROUND:

There has been an increase in the number of nurses working in other countries worldwide and concerns have been raised regarding their working conditions.

METHOD:

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 11 internationally educated nurses. Directed content analysis was used to analyse the data and Kanter's theory of empowerment was used as a framework.

RESULTS:

Access to information was generally good. Access to support for their relationship with their managers varied. Regarding access to resources, nurses unfamiliar with clinical leadership found team leadership challenging. Access to in-house learning opportunities were reported as good. Access to informal power was more common than access to formal power.

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings support Kanter's theory and demonstrate that internationally experienced nurses encountered varying degrees of access to empowering structures. Access to information and formal power was more general and related to the unit. Access to resources, support, opportunities and informal power were related to both the unit and the informants' specific situation as IENs.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT:

Managers need to support IENs when having a team leadership role, facilitate encounters between IENs and ordinary staff, and establishing mentorship for IENs.

Keywords
Internationally educated nurses, structural empowerment, support, teamwork, management
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25517 (URN)10.1111/jonm.12617 (DOI)000446450700012 ()29528163 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85043479195 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Eerik
Available from: 2017-11-11 Created: 2017-11-11 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, E. & Engström, M. (2018). The challenges of interviewing internationally educated nurses and doctors in another language than their native language. In: : . Paper presented at Third Nordic Conference in Nursing research, 13-15 June 2018, Oslo, Norway.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The challenges of interviewing internationally educated nurses and doctors in another language than their native language
2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: Globalization has increased the migration of internationally educated nurses’ (IENs) and International Medical Graduates (IMG) to high-income countries.

Objective: To highlight the challenges of interviewing internationally educated nurses and doctors in another language than their native language regarding their working experiences in the Swedish health and social care system.

Method: Semi-structured interviews with eleven IENs and eleven IMGs. Data were analyzed with qualitative content analysis.

Results: Interviews with non-Swedish trained nurses and doctors provide important information about their working experiences in the host country, even if their language skills in the host country’s language can be poor. However, the data had a less nuanced language, the same word could be used repeatedly, English words were sometimes used when not finding the Swedish words and some questions were difficult for the informants to understand and had to be omitted. Performing the interview, transcribing and analyzing them took more time compared to interviews with native speakers. The informants clearly stated that they wanted the interview to be in Swedish and not in for example English.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27292 (URN)
Conference
Third Nordic Conference in Nursing research, 13-15 June 2018, Oslo, Norway
Available from: 2018-06-21 Created: 2018-06-21 Last updated: 2018-06-25Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, E., Lindmark, G., Haddad, B. & Axemo, P. (2014). Young people, sexuality, and HIV prevention within Christian faith communities in South Africa: a cross-sectional survey. Journal of religion and health, 53(6), 1662-1675
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Young people, sexuality, and HIV prevention within Christian faith communities in South Africa: a cross-sectional survey
2014 (English)In: Journal of religion and health, ISSN 0022-4197, E-ISSN 1573-6571, Vol. 53, no 6, p. 1662-1675Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Faith communities exert a powerful influence on the life of their members, and studies are needed about how they may be able to influence young people's attitudes regarding sexuality and HIV prevention. Data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire from young people (811), aged 15-24 years, affiliated to the Roman Catholic Church, the Lutheran Church and the Assemblies of God. The majority of participants perceived themselves at risk of HIV infection (53 %). Premarital sexual abstinence was the most frequently (88 %) reported prevention message, followed by faithfulness (23 %), HIV testing (18 %) and condom use (17 %). Furthermore, religious affiliation was associated with education on sexuality and HIV in youth groups, with better information given to members of the Lutheran and Catholic churches. Faith communities need to strengthen their capacity to educate young people in a more holistic way about sexuality and HIV prevention.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23536 (URN)10.1007/s10943-013-9753-7 (DOI)000344539200007 ()23832228 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-12-18 Created: 2017-02-06 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, E., Lindmark, G., Axemo, P., Haddad, B. & Ahlberg, B. M. (2013). Faith, Premarital Sex and Relationships: Are Church Messages in Accordance with the Perceived Realities of the Youth?: A Qualitative Study in KwaZulu–Natal, South Africa. Journal of religion and health, 52(2), 454-466
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Faith, Premarital Sex and Relationships: Are Church Messages in Accordance with the Perceived Realities of the Youth?: A Qualitative Study in KwaZulu–Natal, South Africa
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2013 (English)In: Journal of religion and health, ISSN 0022-4197, E-ISSN 1573-6571, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 454-466Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Since religious messages on life style have a strong impact in South Africa, it is important to assess how they relate to the situation for young people at risk of HIV infection. Nine focus group discussions were conducted with youth (n=62), aged 13–20 years, from the Roman Catholic Church, the Lutheran Church, and the Assemblies of God. Young people were ambivalent toward sexual contacts since these generally were expected to be part of a relationship even though the church condemns premarital sex. Girls perceived the moral norms to concern them more than the boys for whom sexual needs were more accepted. These moral barriers lead to lack of information about protection and may increase the risk of HIV. The realities young people facing should be a major concern for the faith communities.

Keywords
Adolescents, Faith communities, HIV prevention, Religion, Sexuality, Sub-Saharan Africa
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
International Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23535 (URN)10.1007/s10943-011-9491-7 (DOI)000317625500010 ()
Available from: 2011-06-20 Created: 2017-02-06 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, E. (2011). Christian Communities and Prevention of HIV among Youth in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Christian Communities and Prevention of HIV among Youth in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
2011 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Young people in South Africa, particularly females, are at great risk of acquiring HIV, and heterosexual sex is the predominant mode of HIV transmission. In order to curb the epidemic the Department of Health encourages all sectors in the society, including religious institutions, to respond effectively.

The present thesis seeks to increase the understanding of the role of Christian communities in prevention of HIV for young people. Three denominations in KwaZulu-Natal were selected to reflect the diversity of Christian churches in South Africa: the Roman Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Southern Africa, and the Assemblies of God.

Using qualitative interviews the first paper explores how religious leaders (n=16) deal with the conflict between the values of the church and young people’s sexuality. Study II reports on attitudes to HIV prevention for young people among religious leaders (n=215) using questionnaire survey data. Study III investigates how young people (n=62) reflect on messages received from their churches regarding premarital sex by analysing nine focus group discussions. In the fourth paper, based on questionnaire survey data, we report on young people’s (n=811) experiences of relationships with the opposite sex and their perceived risk of HIV infection.

The view that young people in churches are sexually active before marriage was common among religious leadership. The majority of religious leaders also reported that they are responsible for educating young people about HIV prevention. Religious leaders who had received training on HIV were more likely to run a life skills programme for young people, however they were ambivalent about prevention messages. Young people reported premarital sexual abstinence as the main HIV prevention message from their churches. The majority responded that they had received information about HIV in church. To be in a relationship was common, more so for males for whom multiple relationships also were viewed more acceptable. To perceive themselves at risk of HIV infection was common.

Further training for religious leaders is needed to enable them to manage the conflict between the doctrine of the church and their willingness to assist young people in the transition into adulthood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2011. p. 69
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 684
Keywords
HIV prevention, Young people, Religion, Religious leaders, Sexuality, HIV risk, South Africa
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
International Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23532 (URN)978-91-554-8113-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2011-09-23, Room IX, Universiteteshuset, Biskopsgatan 3, Uppsala, 09:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-02-06 Created: 2017-02-06 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, E., Lindmark, G., Haddad, B. & Axemo, P. (2011). Involvement of religious leaders in HIV prevention, South Africa. Svensk Missionstidsskrift, 99(2), 119-135
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Involvement of religious leaders in HIV prevention, South Africa
2011 (English)In: Svensk Missionstidsskrift, ISSN 0346-217X, Vol. 99, no 2, p. 119-135Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Religious leaders do not easily get involved in HIV prevention for young people since discussing sexuality publicly is taboo. A self-administrated questionnaire survey was conducted among local religious leaders (n=215) August-October 2008, when they convened at regional meetings in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The questionnaire included socio-demographic data, previous HIV education and attitudes to HIV prevention for young people, policy issues, and questions on stigma. The participants (186 males, 29females) were affiliated to the Catholic Church (66), Lutheran church (82),and the Assemblies of God (67). Religious leaders regarded themselves as responsible for educating young people about HIV, and were interested in topics concerning young people’s sexuality. However, only 39% reported that their church had run a life-skill programme for youth in the last six months. The results indicated that religious leaders who had participated in HIV training were more likely to have arranged a life-skill programme for young people and also more likely to have taken an HIV test.

Religious leaders were positive about further training on HIV- related issues, and if learning opportunities are offered to them, this might increase their involvement in HIV prevention among young people.

Keywords
Religious leaders, HIV prevention, young people, South Africa
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
International Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23538 (URN)
Available from: 2011-08-03 Created: 2017-02-06 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, E., Lindmark, G., Axemo, P., Haddad, B. & Ahlberg, B. M. (2010). Ambivalence, silence and gender differences in church leaders' HIV-prevention messages to young people in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Culture, Health and Sexuality, 12(1), 103-114
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ambivalence, silence and gender differences in church leaders' HIV-prevention messages to young people in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
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2010 (English)In: Culture, Health and Sexuality, ISSN 1369-1058, E-ISSN 1464-5351, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 103-114Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A series of semi-structured interviews on HIV prevention were conducted with South African clergy with pastoral and liturgical responsibilities from the Roman Catholic Church, the Lutheran Church and the Assemblies of God. The interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed by interpretive descriptive analysis. Three themes indicative of church leaders' approach to HIV prevention among youth emerged: dilemmas in breaking the silence on HIV and AIDS; ambivalent HIV-prevention messages from church leaders to young people; and gender differences in HIV-prevention messages. While church leaders had taken steps to overcome the stigma, the dilemmas of balancing theological understanding with resistance from their congregations presented a complex scenario. Ambivalence to HIV prevention concerned whose responsibility it was to educate young people about HIV; talking about sexuality in public; pre-marital abstinence and condom use; and resistance from congregation members towards HIV prevention. Finally, findings indicated a discrepancy between church leaders' belief in gender equality and the HIV-prevention messages they verbalised, which appears to burden girls.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23534 (URN)10.1080/13691050903141192 (DOI)000277519300008 ()19675963 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-12-22 Created: 2017-02-06 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6869-6863

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