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Biamba, Cresantus
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Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Biamba, C. (2018). Implementing Education for Sustainable Development and Pedagogical Challenges in teacher training programme. In: : . Paper presented at ATEE Annual Conference: A future for all – teaching for a sustainable society. 20th – 22nd August 2018, Gävle, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implementing Education for Sustainable Development and Pedagogical Challenges in teacher training programme
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

ESD has a transformational role since it aims at encouraging the transformation of education and reorientation of societies in order to reach sustainable development (UNESCO, 2014). Teaching and learning for ESD are encouraged to promote critical thinking, to imagine the future and make decisions in order to empower learners to take action towards building a sustainable society. Pedagogy makes the connection between teaching and learning and is therefore crucial for education’s contribution to sustainable development. This paper examines pedagogical approaches that promote sustainability and how teachers might be empowered to improve pedagogic practice for diverse learners and in challenging context. It explores pedagogical contents of ESD, and the pedagogical challenges educators face when the ESD paradigm is put into practice particularly across different disciplines in the context of teacher education in a developing country. The methods employed included documentary analysis, interviews and observation. The findings are based on interviews with student teachers after their teaching practice placement, as well documentary evidence.  The paper also suggests ways in which educators can address difficulties when trying to infuse the ESD paradigm into teacher education programmes.

Keywords
Education for sustainable development, diverse learners, pedagogical approaches, sustainability, teacher education
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27939 (URN)
Conference
ATEE Annual Conference: A future for all – teaching for a sustainable society. 20th – 22nd August 2018, Gävle, Sweden
Available from: 2018-09-23 Created: 2018-09-23 Last updated: 2018-09-24Bibliographically approved
Biamba, C. (2017). Developing Teaching and Learning in a Management Education Course: Key Issues, Effective Strategies. International Journal for Innovation Education and Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developing Teaching and Learning in a Management Education Course: Key Issues, Effective Strategies
2017 (English)In: International Journal for Innovation Education and Research, ISSN 2411-2933Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this paper is to suggest ways of improving student learning in an educational management course. The course had traditionally been taught in a face-to-face model, in multiple sections, at the university. The first part of the paper begins by given a general overview of some key ideas about student learning. It describes some of the common teaching and learning models and theories relevant to higher education. The second part examines how we might use different methods of teaching to improve student learning in the management education course. The paper shows that a more constructively aligned teaching and learning environment would lead students to adjust their learning approaches in a way that a deeper situational learning approach and a less surface situational learning approach would be employed in their study, despite their pre-existing individual differences in the preferred learning approaches.

Keywords
Improvement, Leadership and Management, Student Learning, Teaching and Learning
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25716 (URN)
Available from: 2017-12-01 Created: 2017-12-01 Last updated: 2018-06-26Bibliographically approved
Biamba, C. (2017). Integration and education of immigrant children at Swedish schools: A case study of two schools.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integration and education of immigrant children at Swedish schools: A case study of two schools
2017 (English)In: Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

The integration of immigrant children has emerged as a pressing yet controversial issue in public debates around the world over the past two decades. Education of immigrant children is one of the numerous pedagogical phenomena that continue to arouse questions concerning the efficiency of dealing with them. This study examines the education of immigrant school children in Sweden, focusing on Swedish instruction, cultural awareness, parent participation, and teacher preparation for working with immigrant students. Data collection involved interviews with teachers at two schools and with immigrant children. A qualitative study based on content analysis of semi-structured interviews with immigrant students explain the different challenges posed by the integration process of immigrant children in schools. Based on the findings the study offer recommendations in order to improve the academic and social integration of immigrant children.

Keywords
Education, immigrant children, integration, schools
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25719 (URN)
Available from: 2017-12-01 Created: 2017-12-01 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Biamba, C. & Odero, J. (2016). A policy review of school leadership in sub-saharan Africa. In: Leading better learning: School leadership and quality in the Education 2030 agenda: Regional reviews of policies and practices. Paper presented at Symposium on Education Policies “Leading better learning: School leadership and quality in the Education 2030 Agenda” – Regional reviews of policies and practices on school leadership, 18-20 January 2016, UNESCO, Paris, France (pp. 111-136). UNESCO Education Sector
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A policy review of school leadership in sub-saharan Africa
2016 (English)In: Leading better learning: School leadership and quality in the Education 2030 agenda: Regional reviews of policies and practices, UNESCO Education Sector , 2016, p. 111-136Conference paper, Published paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

This report offers an extensive comparative review of school leadership in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). It examines and presents evidence from selected educational contexts, to educators, policymakers and other stakeholders interested in successful schools.

Effective school leaders are central to school performance, as they provide direction, motivation and support to teachers, administrators and students, in order to improve education service delivery and learning outcomes. However, this review shows that most SSA countries have no adequate policies to ensure that school principals become effective instructional leaders.

Key challenges in school leadership include inadequate preparation and limited professional development opportunities; limited ICT skills for transformative teaching and learning; corruption, which denies students learning resources; and gender inequality. In many SSA countries, teaching experience remains the main path to principalship; this means that many school heads are ill-prepared to meet the challenges posed by the changing nature of their job.Besides, the recruitment of school leaders is unsystematic and not always based on professional competence. Mechanisms for recruitment include promotion by seniority, rewarding political allegiance, corruption, nepotism and favouritism.

The available literature shows that most countries have introduced governance reforms, including decentralized school models, that require principals to have appropriate skills and knowledge in financial management, instructional leadership and people management in order to meet the challenge of demanding school contexts. However, strategies for training, support and professional development of school leaders remain inadequate.

Hence, the demand for high-quality learning outcomes, combined with additional responsibilities for human and financial management, put pressure on poorly trained school leaders. To address this challenge, most SSA governments should strengthen their policies on school leadership. Education authorities need to identify the school leadership responsibilities that are most effective in improving student learning. Governments should increase resources for training, so that current and future principals can develop relevant skills and attitudes foreffective instructional leadership. Policymakers should make the principals’ role more attractive by improving status and remuneration to attract high-performing leaders.

This regional review should help policymakers across the region make the most of their professional development resources, based on evidence of effectiveness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
UNESCO Education Sector, 2016
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23111 (URN)
Conference
Symposium on Education Policies “Leading better learning: School leadership and quality in the Education 2030 Agenda” – Regional reviews of policies and practices on school leadership, 18-20 January 2016, UNESCO, Paris, France
Available from: 2016-12-18 Created: 2016-12-18 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Biamba, C. (2016). Inclusion and Classroom Practices in a Swedish school : A case study of a school in Stockholm. Journal of Education and Practice, 7(3), 119-124
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inclusion and Classroom Practices in a Swedish school : A case study of a school in Stockholm
2016 (English)In: Journal of Education and Practice, ISSN 2222-1735, E-ISSN 2222-288X, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 119-124Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The inclusion of young children with special needs with their typically developing peers has been the subject of discussion for more than three decades. There are several compelling reasons to create high-quality inclusive programs for young children with special needs in schools. Most countries supports inclusion and research has shown teachers’ ability and success in modifying activities and contexts in such a way that they facilitate the development of young children with special needs. The purpose of this paper is to discuss findings of a small scale study looking at the links between inclusion and classroom practices vis-a-vis the elementary school system in Sweden. The study indicates that local administrators and the school play a pivotal role in making inclusion work. In addition to complying with government requirements, schools and administrators and teachers in early childhood environments set the tone and philosophy of a program. The paper has attempted to look at some questions about effective inclusive education, it is important to gain insight into how inclusive education works.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IISTE, 2016
Keywords
childhood, children, curriculum, inclusion, teachers
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23045 (URN)
Available from: 2016-12-14 Created: 2016-12-14 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Biamba, C. N. (2014). Education for Sustainable Development in higher education : A study examining the challenges and opportunities for a teacher training programme. In: : . Paper presented at 5th International ERT Symposium 'Education for Rural Transformation', 17-19 September 2014, Kathmandu, Nepal.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Education for Sustainable Development in higher education : A study examining the challenges and opportunities for a teacher training programme
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Many years have passed since sustainable development (ESD) became world famous in the Brundtland Commission publication, “Our Common Future”; however, still many universities are unaware of it or confuse it with environmental sustainability. The ESD concept contrasts with existing teaching methods, mainly focused into resource depletion. This paper explores the perceptions of teachers and students towards including Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) into the teacher training programme in the Faculty of Education at the University of Buea, Cameroon. The main purpose of the paper  is to identify current ESD related teaching and learning in a teacher training programme and the opportunities for, and barriers to, further extensions of ESD. The results indicate that there is general support for the inclusion of ESD in the curriculum, but there is considerable uncertainty expressed by lecturers and students concerning how this can best be done. There is a general concern that additional embedding into the teacher training programme might lead to reductions in the amount of core subject matter being taught. The programme and ESD agendas are to an extent seen by lecturers and students as conflicting. ESD is viewed mainly in terms of curriculum content as opposed to the pedagogy employed.

Keywords
Education for Sustainability Development; Students’ perception; Lecturers’ perception; Curriculum content; Teaching methods and practices; Pedagogy
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23109 (URN)
Conference
5th International ERT Symposium 'Education for Rural Transformation', 17-19 September 2014, Kathmandu, Nepal
Available from: 2016-12-18 Created: 2016-12-18 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Biamba, C. (2014). Education Millennium Development and EFA Goals in Cameroon and Nigeria. In: : . Paper presented at Comparative and International Education Society (CIES) Conference, 10-15 March 2014, Toronto, Canada.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Education Millennium Development and EFA Goals in Cameroon and Nigeria
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

At the World Education Forum (Dakar, 2000) the international community reaffirmed its vision of Education for All (EFA) through the Dakar Framework for Action which set six major EFA goals: (i) early childhood care and education, (ii) free and compulsory primary education for all, (iii) appropriate learning and life skills for young people and adults (iv) adult literacy (v) gender parity and equality and (vi) quality of education. Four quantifiable goals were set for 2015: increasing adult literacy by 50%, ensuring universal primary education, gender parity and equality, and quality of education, measured by the survival rate to grade 5.

While some tangible progress has been made since 2000 towards the EFA goals, many countries still lag behind. In particular, the majority of the countries which were furthest away from UPE in 2000 have made insufficient progress towards achieving free and compulsory primary education by 2015. The most significant limitations are the lack of sufficient space, resources and teachers to address the learning needs of the most disadvantaged children. The international agenda also tends to overlook the national or local contexts; traditional, indigenous and cultural views of an education of quality, as well as of the role and status of the educator or teacher. This can lead to conceptual and empirical flaws in international research made in a non-participatory manner. The purpose of this paper is to review and analyze existing policies and practices that have been undertaken by the governments of Cameroon and Nigeria to address the teacher gap in basic education, indicating their commitment to the goals of Education for All.

Keywords
Cameroon, Education, EFA, MDG´s, Nigeria, Primary Schooling.
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23110 (URN)
Conference
Comparative and International Education Society (CIES) Conference, 10-15 March 2014, Toronto, Canada
Available from: 2016-12-18 Created: 2016-12-18 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Biamba, C. (2014). The Impact of Education across Sectors and the Millennium Development Goals. European Journal of Educational Sciences, 1(2), 58-75
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Impact of Education across Sectors and the Millennium Development Goals
2014 (English)In: European Journal of Educational Sciences, ISSN 1792-1341, E-ISSN 2053-9746, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 58-75Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which were agreed atUnited Nations General Assembly Millennium Summit in 2000, addresschallenges in poverty reduction, hunger, health, gender equality, education,and environmental sustainability, an ambitious set of development targetsaimed at reducing poverty and improving the lives of people all around theworld by 2015. Over the past decade, notable progress has been made oneach individual MDG even in the poorest countries and the most difficultcircumstances. Such success shows that the MDGs can be achieved. Indeed,the MDGs have led to unprecedented commitments, partnerships andprogress in combating poverty and hunger, in improving school enrolment,in fostering gender equality and in extending equal access to health care. Yetprogress is uneven between and within regions and countries and often tooslow to meet the 2015 deadline. There is a growing realization that, withoutrenewed commitment and concerted action, some countries will not reach allof the MDGs. In recent years there has been a growing body of literature onthe interconnectedness of education and the Millennium Development Goals(MDGs). The purpose of this paper is to synthesize global evidencegenerated through various MDG Country Reports and supplementarydocuments that focus on trends toward progress and on the gaps anddisparities that have arisen. The paper will help to establish a betterunderstanding of how investment in education can lead to developmentoutcomes that aid the achievement of the MDGs.

Keywords
Development, Education, Goals, Growth, Millennium, Outcomes, Poverty
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23047 (URN)10.19044/ejes.v1no2a5 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-12-14 Created: 2016-12-14 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Biamba, C. (2014). Towards Reaching Education Millennium Development and EFA Goals in Cameroon and Nigeria. In: : . Paper presented at NERA 42nd Congress 'Education for sustainable development', 5-7 March 2014, Lillehammer, Norway.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards Reaching Education Millennium Development and EFA Goals in Cameroon and Nigeria
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

At the World Education Forum (Dakar, 2000) the international community reaffirmed its vision of Education for All (EFA) through the Dakar Framework for Action which set six major EFA goals: (i) early childhood care and education, (ii) free and compulsory primary education for all, (iii) appropriate learning and life skills for young people and adults (iv) adult literacy (v) gender parity and equality and (vi) quality of education. Four quantifiable goals were set for 2015: increasing adult literacy by 50%, ensuring universal primary education, gender parity and equality, and quality of education, measured by the survival rate to grade 5.

While some tangible progress has been made since 2000 towards the EFA goals, many countries still lag behind. In particular, the majority of the countries which were furthest away from UPE in 2000 have made insufficient progress towards achieving free and compulsory primary education by 2015. The most significant limitations are the lack of sufficient space, resources and teachers to address the learning needs of the most disadvantaged children. National capacity to collect and process data and information for informed policymaking and implementation to hire sufficient numbers of qualified teachers is often weak. As the demand for quality teachers increases, disparities in teacher qualifications only worsens; schools and areas with better working conditions and higher salaries bid away the better qualified teachers from already difficult-to-staff schools.

The international agenda also tends to overlook the national or local contexts; traditional, indigenous and cultural views of an education of quality, as well as of the role and status of the educator or teacher. This can lead to conceptual and empirical flaws in international research made in a non-participatory manner.

The purpose of this paper is to review and analyze existing policies and practices that have been undertaken by the governments of Cameroon and Nigeria to address the teacher gap in basic education, indicating their commitment to the goals of Education for All.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23107 (URN)
Conference
NERA 42nd Congress 'Education for sustainable development', 5-7 March 2014, Lillehammer, Norway
Available from: 2016-12-18 Created: 2016-12-18 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Biamba, C. (2013). Implementing the Millennium Development Goals 2000-2015: Has Education Made a Difference?. Stockholm: Stockholm University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implementing the Millennium Development Goals 2000-2015: Has Education Made a Difference?
2013 (English)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In recent years there has been a growing body of literature on the interconnectedness of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the need to maximize opportunities for education and their linkages. The existing empirical studies confirm some of the arguments about the benefits of education and the linkages to the MDGs.With the developmental outcomes of basic education in mind, this desk study set out to examine in what ways, and under what conditions investment in education is important in relation to the millennium development goals. It provides a synthesis of research on the potential contribution of basic education to achieving the MDGs, focusing on key texts produced by the international institutions. Within this review a key focal point will be the context in which education appears to impact the various MDGs outcomes, which is referred to as the ―enabling environment‖. The report sought to explore the evidence about the contribution of basic education to poverty reduction and the achievement of the MDGs within certain countries or regions. It considered the critical support systems, policy environments and national capacities upon which good quality basic education depends, and assessed the role of basic education in developing and sustaining these.In response to the global call to achieve the MDGs by 2015, many countries are making remarkable progress demonstrating that setting bold, collective goals in the fight against poverty yields results. Expanding access and improving the quality of education are both imperative for MDG progress. A balance must be struck to move both objectives forward.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2013. p. 94
Series
Yellow Report / Institute of International Education, Stockholm University ; 125
Keywords
Development, Education, Goals, Growth, Millennium, Outcomes, Poverty, MDGs
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23049 (URN)978-91-980620-4-5 (ISBN)
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Available from: 2016-12-14 Created: 2016-12-14 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
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