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MacCutcheon, DouglasORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4947-4579
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Publications (10 of 16) Show all publications
Ogbuagu, C.-C. T., Linden, E., MacCutcheon, D., Nilsson, E., Persson, T. & Kabanshi, A. (2023). On the Performance of Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation in Classrooms: A Pre-Occupancy Study at a School in Southern Sweden. Sustainability, 15(3), Article ID 2546.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the Performance of Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation in Classrooms: A Pre-Occupancy Study at a School in Southern Sweden
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2023 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 15, no 3, article id 2546Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The implementation and application of diffused ceiling ventilation (DCV) is gradually gaining momentum, especially in Denmark, Finland, and the Netherlands. In countries such as Sweden, the application is limited despite the favorable conditions for implementation. The current study investigates the performance of DCV and mixing ventilation in a pre-occupancy field study for newly renovated classrooms in Southern Sweden. Two classrooms at the school were installed with diffuse ceiling ventilation while the rest had mixing ventilation. The objective of the study was to compare and evaluate the ventilation performance in terms of indoor environmental quality parameters such as thermal comfort, air quality indexes, airflow, and temperature distribution. Pre-occupancy measurements were performed in two classrooms with similar room characteristics, with one room running under mixing ventilation and the other under DCV. Constant temperature anemometers, thermocouples, and INNOVA thermal comfort were used to measure the indoor air speeds, temperature, and thermal comfort, respectively. Tracer gas measurements, with SF6, were performed to assess air quality. Additionally acoustic measurements were conducted to assess the acoustic benefits of DCV on reducing ventilation noise. The results demonstrate that DCV offers similar indoor environmental conditions to mixing ventilation but has better acoustic performance especially on reducing the ventilation noise. Indoor environmental conditions were very homogeneous under DCV with mixing ventilation showing tendencies for short circuit ventilation. This study demonstrates that DCV has a potential for implementation in Swedish schools with minimal system modification on existing ventilation and air distribution systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
diffused ceiling ventilation; ventilation performance; indoor air quality; air distribution; classrooms
National Category
Civil Engineering
Research subject
Sustainable Urban Development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40984 (URN)10.3390/su15032546 (DOI)000930378100001 ()2-s2.0-85147884667 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-02-01 Created: 2023-02-01 Last updated: 2023-03-09Bibliographically approved
Sörqvist, P., MacCutcheon, D., Holmgren, M., Haga, A. & Västfjäll, D. (2022). Moral spillover in carbon offset judgments. Frontiers in Psychology, 13, Article ID 957252.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Moral spillover in carbon offset judgments
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2022 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 13, article id 957252Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Moral spillover occurs when a morally loaded behavior becomes associated with another source. In the current paper, we addressed whether the moral motive behind causing CO2 emissions spills over on to how much people think is needed to compensate for the emissions. Reforestation (planting trees) is a common carbon-offset technique. With this in mind, participants estimated the number of trees needed to compensate for the carbon emissions from vehicles that were traveling with various moral motives. Two experiments revealed that people think larger carbon offsets are needed to compensate for the emissions when the emissions are caused by traveling for immoral reasons, in comparison with when caused by traveling for moral reasons. Hence, moral motives influence people’s judgments of carbon-offset requirements even though these motives have no bearing on what is compensated for. Moreover, the effect was insensitive to individual differences in carbon literacy and gender and to the unit (kilograms or tons) in which the CO2 emissions were expressed to the participants. The findings stress the role of emotion in how people perceive carbon offsetting.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers, 2022
Keywords
carbon offsets; compensation estimates; emotion; moral motives; moral spillover
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Sustainable Urban Development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-39960 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2022.957252 (DOI)000876461700001 ()36312167 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85140800600 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-09-21 Created: 2022-09-21 Last updated: 2022-11-17Bibliographically approved
Kabanshi, A., Linden, E., Ogbuagu, T.-C., MacCutcheon, D. & Persson, T. (2022). Plenum airflow distribution and its influence on the performance of a diffuse ceiling ventilation. In: Li A., Olofsson T., Kosonen R. (Ed.), E3S Web Conf. Volume 356, 2022 The 16th ROOMVENT Conference (ROOMVENT 2022): . Paper presented at 16th ROOMVENT Conference, ROOMVENT 2022, Xi'an, China, 16-19 September 2022. Xian, 356, Article ID 01026.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Plenum airflow distribution and its influence on the performance of a diffuse ceiling ventilation
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2022 (English)In: E3S Web Conf. Volume 356, 2022 The 16th ROOMVENT Conference (ROOMVENT 2022) / [ed] Li A., Olofsson T., Kosonen R., Xian, 2022, Vol. 356, article id 01026Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Implementation of diffuse ceiling ventilation (DCV) is slowly gaining momentum and applications in building ventilation have taken off with countries like Denmark, Finland and Netherlands taking the lead in Europe. However, DCV is yet to gain a foothold in Sweden and so not many installations are known, and their performance in relation to Swedish building practice is not yet established. A school in southern Sweden was subsequently renovated and two classrooms were equipped with a sound-absorbent suspended ceiling compatible with DCV. DCV has possible benefits for educational environments including improved thermal comfort as well as lower costs and noise levels. However, it is currently still unknown how supply conditions in the plenum affect the diffusion of air and resulting conditions within the room. To assess airflow characteristics and whether these influence flow conditions in the classroom, we investigated and compared the performance of DCV with two different supply conditions in the plenum. Air speeds and temperature distribution measurements in the plenum and classroom were performed with constant temperature anemometers and thermocouples respectively. The general observation from this study and the system setup herein is that airflow and temperature characteristics in the classroom were independent of the airflow conditions in the plenum. Further investigations in a controlled climate chamber are recommended to investigate and optimise system performance in accordance with Swedish building practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Xian: , 2022
Keywords
Air Distribution, Indoor Environment, Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation
National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Sustainable Urban Development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-39952 (URN)10.1051/e3sconf/202235601026 (DOI)2-s2.0-85146846926 (Scopus ID)
Conference
16th ROOMVENT Conference, ROOMVENT 2022, Xi'an, China, 16-19 September 2022
Available from: 2022-09-19 Created: 2022-09-19 Last updated: 2023-02-06Bibliographically approved
Eccles, R., van der Linde, J., le Roux, M., Holloway, J., MacCutcheon, D., Ljung, R. & Swanepoel, D. W. (2021). Effect of music instruction on phonological awareness and early literacy skills of five- to seven-year-old children. Early Child Development and Care, 191(12), 1896-1910
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of music instruction on phonological awareness and early literacy skills of five- to seven-year-old children
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2021 (English)In: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275, Vol. 191, no 12, p. 1896-1910Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ABSTRACT Multiple studies and systematic reviews have shown that music instruction improves phonological awareness (PA) and early literacy skills in children, although findings vary. In meta-analyses, the reliability and significance of the transfer effect are reduced. The study evaluated the effect of varying durations of music instruction exposure, over a single academic year, on PA and early literacy of young children. Based on the exposure to music instruction, participants were assigned to either a low- or high-exposure group. Additional analyses were conducted for 17 age-matched pairs and to compare participants that only received class music to those that received additional music instruction. Between-groups comparisons showed no significant difference after a single academic year of music instruction. Within-groups comparisons identified more PA improvements in the high-exposure group. Exposure to music instruction for no less than one academic year, is required to conclusively evaluate the effect on PA and early literacy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2021
Keywords
early literacy, music instruction, phonological awareness, young children
National Category
Pediatrics Learning
Research subject
Sustainable Urban Development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-33343 (URN)10.1080/03004430.2020.1803852 (DOI)000558545500001 ()2-s2.0-85089292439 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education (STINT), IB2017-7004
Available from: 2020-08-18 Created: 2020-08-18 Last updated: 2021-11-29Bibliographically approved
Eccles, R., van der Linde, J., le Roux, M., Holloway, J., MacCutcheon, D., Ljung, R. & Swanepoel, D. W. (2021). Is phonological awareness related to pitch, rhythm, and speech-in-noise discrimination in young children?. Language, speech & hearing services in schools, 52(1), 383-395
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is phonological awareness related to pitch, rhythm, and speech-in-noise discrimination in young children?
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2021 (English)In: Language, speech & hearing services in schools, ISSN 0161-1461, E-ISSN 1558-9129, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 383-395Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose. Phonological awareness (PA) requires the complex integration of language, speech, and auditory processing abilities. Enhanced pitch and rhythm discrimination have been shown to improve PA and speech-in-noise (SiN) discrimination. The screening of pitch and rhythm discrimination, if nonlinguistic correlates of these abilities, could contribute to screening procedures prior to diagnostic assessment. This research aimed to determine the association of PA abilities with pitch, rhythm, and SiN discrimination in children aged 5–7 years old.

Method. Forty-one participants' pitch, rhythm, and SiN discrimination and PA abilities were evaluated. To control for confounding factors, including biological and environmental risk exposure and gender differences, typically developing male children from high socioeconomic statuses were selected. Pearson correlation was used to identify associations between variables, and stepwise regression analysis was used to identify possible predictors of PA.

Results. Correlations of medium strength were identified between PA and pitch, rhythm, and SiN discrimination. Pitch and diotic digit-in-noise discrimination formed the strongest regression model (adjusted R2 = .4213, r = .649) for phoneme–grapheme correspondence.

Conclusions. The current study demonstrates predictive relationships between the complex auditory discrimination skills of pitch, rhythm, and diotic digit-in-noise recognition and foundational phonemic awareness and phonic skills in young males from high socioeconomic statuses. Pitch, rhythm, and digit-in-noise discrimination measures hold potential as screening measures for delays in phonemic awareness and phonic difficulties and as components of stimulation programs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ASHA, 2021
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-34793 (URN)10.1044/2020_LSHSS-20-00032 (DOI)000609924400028 ()33464981 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85099707183 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-01-21 Created: 2021-01-21 Last updated: 2021-02-18Bibliographically approved
MacCutcheon, D. (2021). Negative responses to urban residential noise as a social rebound effect of increasing population density: Legislative challenges and auditory territoriality.. Noise & Health, 23(108), 35-41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Negative responses to urban residential noise as a social rebound effect of increasing population density: Legislative challenges and auditory territoriality.
2021 (English)In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 23, no 108, p. 35-41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Populations in cities are projected to increase globally, densifying urban residential environments with both positive and negative effects. Positive social effects are offset by negative health effects however; urban residential noise has been identified in a large number of studies as a significant contributor to social unrest as well as a risk to physiological and psychological health caused by stress, making this topic highly relevant to the discussion on sustainability urban growth. Focusing on the psychological rebound effect of urban residential noise, this paper attempts to explain how and why auditory aspects of the spatial environment negatively influences urban residents. To provide context and to indicate areas in need of improvement, the legislative challenges to be faced are considered, with Sweden as a prime example of a first world country grappling with the effects of increased urban density. Existing building legislation regarding residential noise is considered in relation to studies investigating the effects of residential noise on psychological and physiological health, outlining areas in need of future development. Then, health responses to residential noise are placed in a broader evolutionary context by considering how these effects might be the result of triggered evolutionary mechanisms for keeping population size optimal. Further, the spatial dimension of hearing is discussed with reference to theories of territoriality in environmental psychology and the concept of auditory territoriality is described.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Medknow Publications Pvt. Ltd, 2021
Keywords
Urban density, auditory territoriality, residential noise, social rebound effects
National Category
Psychology Health Sciences
Research subject
Sustainable Urban Development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-35477 (URN)000632998800004 ()33753679 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-03-24 Created: 2021-03-24 Last updated: 2023-05-10Bibliographically approved
Eccles, R., van der Linde, J., le Roux, M., Swanepoel, D. W., MacCutcheon, D. & Ljung, R. (2021). The effect of music education approaches on phonological awareness and early literacy: A systematic review. Australian Journal of Language & Literacy, 44(1), 46-60
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of music education approaches on phonological awareness and early literacy: A systematic review
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2021 (English)In: Australian Journal of Language & Literacy, ISSN 1038-1562, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 46-60Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Music education has been demonstrated to positively influence the development of early literacy with the type of intervention identified as a moderating factor. However, research comparing the effects of different music education approaches on phonological awareness and early literacy is limited. This systematic review aimed to compare the effect of the predominant music education approaches, namely Orff, Kodály, Suzuki and Dalcroze, on phonological awareness and early literacy. The PRISMA-P protocol was followed, and the study was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42018094131). Five electronic databases were searched. Eligibility criteria included peer reviewed English-language journal publications of quasi-experimental or experimental research studies with typically developing populations aged five to eight years old. Musical intervention had to be based on the principles of the Orff, Kodály, Suzuki or Dalcroze music education approaches or a combination thereof. Narrative synthesis was used in data analysis. From 329 records identified, five articles, from 1975 to 2013, qualified for final inclusion. The sample was heterogeneous regarding population characteristics, music education frequency and duration and abilities assessed. The outcomes from the included studies showed that music education improved aspects of phonological awareness and early literacy. However, standardization of methodological aspects would be required for definite comparisons between the music education approaches to be made. Although direct effects of the music education approaches could not be described, the review outlined factors, such as methodological diversity, that influence the investigation of skill transfer from music education to literacy abilities. The lack of and need for research from lower-middle income countries investigating music education as an intervention approach for phonological awareness and early literacy was identified.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Australian Literacy Educators' Association, 2021
Keywords
LANGUAGE; CHILDREN; SKILLS; INTERVENTION; PRESCHOOLERS; INSTRUCTION; CURRICULUM; EFFICACY; OUTCOMES; SPEECH
National Category
Psychology Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-35475 (URN)000631078000005 ()2-s2.0-85125657197 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-03-24 Created: 2021-03-24 Last updated: 2022-09-22Bibliographically approved
MacCutcheon, D., Holmgren, M. & Haga, A. (2020). Assuming the best: Individual differences in compensatory “green” beliefs predict susceptibility to the negative footprint illusion. Sustainability, 12(8), Article ID 3414.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assuming the best: Individual differences in compensatory “green” beliefs predict susceptibility to the negative footprint illusion
2020 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 8, article id 3414Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent years have seen a marked increase in carbon emissions despite pledges made by the international community at the Paris Accord in 2015 to reduce fossil fuel production and consumption. Rebound effects could contribute to this phenomenon as, in which attempts to curb carbon emissions might have inadvertently led to an upswing in fossil fuel usage. The present study hypothesizes that rebound effects are driven by a misapplication of compensatory balancing heuristics, with the unintended outcome of producing inaccurate estimates of the environmental impact of “green” or environmentally friendly labelled products or behaviors. The present study therefore aims to investigate the relationship between participants’ degree of compensatory thinking (e.g., “Recycling compensates for driving a car”) and their susceptibility to the Negative Footprint Illusion, a widely replicated phenomenon demonstrating that the presence of “green” products biases carbon footprint estimations. One hundred and twelve participants were asked to complete a 15-item Compensatory Green Beliefs scale and to estimate the total carbon footprint of a set of 15 conventional houses, followed by a set that included 15 “green” houses in addition to 15 conventional houses. Results indicated that participants, on average, believed that the "green" houses were carbon neutral, and that susceptibility to the Negative Footprint Illusion was predicted by performance on the Compensatory Green Beliefs scale. This is the first study confirming that individual differences in cognitive processes (i.e., Compensatory Green Beliefs) are indeed related to inaccurate estimates of “green” products, providing a foundation for further investigation of the influence of “green” and compensatory beliefs on carbon footprint estimates.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2020
Keywords
Negative Footprint Illusion, Compensatory Green Beliefs, climate change, judgment
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Sustainable Urban Development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-32364 (URN)10.3390/su12083414 (DOI)000535598700347 ()2-s2.0-85084834307 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-06-02 Created: 2020-06-02 Last updated: 2022-02-10Bibliographically approved
MacCutcheon, D. (2020). Effects of environmental acoustic factors, individual differences and musical training on speech perception in simulated classrooms. (Doctoral dissertation). Gävle: Gävle University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of environmental acoustic factors, individual differences and musical training on speech perception in simulated classrooms
2020 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Formal learning takes place primarily through speech perception in classroom environments and is therefore dependent on the listener’s ability to cope with a number of acoustic factors that interfere with the speech signal. As classrooms are inclusive spaces accommodating learners with a broad range of abilities and backgrounds, this research investigated some of the ways in which individual differences in supporting cognitive skills are related to speech perception outcomes in various challenging acoustic environments. A potential avenue for the remediation of speech perception problems was also investigated. Studies comparing trained musicians’ with non-musicians’ speech perception have consistently shown a “musicians’ advantage” for speech-in-noise tasks, therefore this research longitudinally investigated whether one year of musical training was capable of producing improved speech perception thresholds in children. Therefore, the first three studies investigated relationships between the cognitive abilities of the listener and speech perception under various challenging environmental conditions, and the final study reported whether a year of musical training was able to produce learning effects generalizable to speech perception in the same challenging auditory environments tested in the two preceding experiments. Tests involved attending to a target talker underexperimental conditions in which the target signal was increasingly difficult todiscern either by lengthening reverberation time or by adding noise (i.e., competing sounds or talkers). In the second, third and fourth studies, the configuration of target and noise sources in the simulated room were manipulated to be either collocated or spatially separated from one-another. In order to additionally explore the relationship between speech perception and underlying cognitive processes, a number of measures were taken including phonological working memory capacity (number updating, digit span) and language assessments (vocabulary, expressive language) and analysed in relation to speech perception outcomes under the various experimental conditions. In all four studies, speech perception was tested in virtual classroom environments that were simulated based on actual classroom acoustic measurements taken in participating Swedish schools. The cumulative findings of this body of work linked differences in language ability, background and performance on various cognitive tests to speech perception thresholds, suggesting that not all learners are on equal footing in the classroom environment. However, musical training of the intensity and duration provided was unable to improve group performanceon speech perception or cognitive measures.

Abstract [sv]

En stor del av elevers inlärning sker via katederundervisning i klassrumsmiljöer och är därför beroende av lyssnarens förmåga att hantera ett flertal akustiska faktorer som stör talsignalen. Klassrum är inkluderande lokaler som skall tillmötesgå elever med en bred variation av förmågor och bakgrunder. Denna avhandling sammankopplar individuella skillnader inom kognitiva förmågor med resultat av taluppfattning i utmanande akustiska miljöer. Även en intervention med syfte att förbättra elevers taluppfattning undersöktes. Tidigare studier som jämför musikers och icke-musikers taluppfattning har konsekvent visat fördelar bland musiker inom uppgifter gällande taluppfattning i konkurrerande bakgrundsljud. Därför genomfördes en longitudinell studie med ett årsmusikalisk träning i syfte att förbättra taluppfattningströskeln hos unga elever. De tre första studierna som presenteras i denna avhandling undersökte förhållandena mellan kognitiva förmågor hos lyssnaren och taluppfattning under utmanande ljudmiljöer. Den sista studien undersökte huruvida ett år av musikalisk träning kan skapa inlärningseffekter generaliserbara till taluppfattning i samma utmanande auditiva miljöer som testades i de tre tidigare experimenten. Studiedeltagarna lyssnade till en talare under experimentella förhållanden där förmågan att uppfatta talaren påverkades av antingen förlängd efterklangstid eller adderade bakgrundsljud (till exempel störande ljud eller andra talare). I studie två, tre och fyra manipulerades även talarens och bakgrundsljudets position i det simulerade rummet till att antingen komma från samma positioneller från olika riktningar. För att dessutom utforska förhållandet mellan taluppfattning och underliggande kognitiva processer analyserades ett antal kognitiva förmågor i relation till taluppfattningsresultaten under de olika experimentella förhållandena. I alla fyra studier testades taluppfattning i virtuella klassrumsmiljöer som simulerades utifrån verkliga akustiska mätningar från svenska skolor. De kumulativa resultaten i detta arbete sammankopplade svårigheter i språkförmåga, bakgrund samt prestation i flertalet kognitiva tester med taluppfattningströsklar. Resultaten visar att alla elever inte har en likvärdig grund i klassrumsmiljön. Resultaten från interventionsstudien gav inget stöd för att musikalisk träning ger positiv effekt på taluppfattning, möjligtvis var typen av musikalisk träning och längden av den musikaliska träningen i experimentet inte tillräcklig för att förbättra deltagarnas prestation i taluppfattning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Gävle: Gävle University Press, 2020. p. 37
Series
Doctoral thesis ; 15
Keywords
speech in noise, cognition, perception, musical training, spatial listening, virtual classroom environment, bakgrundsljud, kognition, taluppfattning, musikalisk träning, rumsligt lyssnande, virtuella klassrumsmiljöer
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Sustainable Urban Development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-33359 (URN)978-91-88145-48-2 (ISBN)978-91-88145-49-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2020-10-15, 12:108, Kungsbäcksvägen 37, Gävle, 11:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2020-09-21 Created: 2020-08-21 Last updated: 2021-02-17
MacCutcheon, D., Füllgrabe, C., Eccles, R., van der Linde, J., Panebianco, C. & Ljung, R. (2020). Investigating the Effect of One Year of Learning to Play a Musical Instrument on Speech-in-Noise Perception and Phonological Short-Term Memory in 5-to-7-Year-Old Children. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, Article ID 2865.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigating the Effect of One Year of Learning to Play a Musical Instrument on Speech-in-Noise Perception and Phonological Short-Term Memory in 5-to-7-Year-Old Children
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2020 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 2865Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The benefits in speech-in-noise perception, language and cognition brought about by extensive musical training in adults and children have been demonstrated in a number of cross-sectional studies. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate whether one year of school-delivered musical training, consisting of individual and group instrumental classes, was capable of producing advantages for speech-in-noise perception and phonological short-term memory in children tested in a simulated classroom environment. Forty-one children aged 5-7 years at the first measurement point participated in the study and either went to a music-focused or a sport-focused private school with an otherwise equivalent school curriculum. The children’s ability to detect number and color words in noise was measured under a number of conditions including different masker types (speech-shaped noise, single-talker background) and under varying spatial combinations of target and masker (spatially collocated, spatially separated). Additionally, a cognitive factor essential to speech perception, namely phonological short-term memory, was assessed. Findings were unable to confirm that musical training of the frequency and duration administered was associated with a musician's advantage for either speech in noise, under any of the masker or spatial conditions tested, or phonological short-term memory.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2020
Keywords
children, cognition, musical training, phonological short-term memory, speech in noise
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
no Strategic Research Area (SFO)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-31616 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02865 (DOI)000509580200001 ()31998174 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85078416989 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-02-03 Created: 2020-02-03 Last updated: 2022-02-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4947-4579

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