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Egegård, C. H., Lindborg, M., Gren, Å., Marcus, L., Pont, M. B. & Colding, J. (2024). Climate Proofing Cities by Navigating Nature-Based Solutions in a Multi-Scale, Social–Ecological Urban Planning Context: A Case Study of Flood Protection in the City of Gothenburg, Sweden. Land, 13(2), Article ID 143.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate Proofing Cities by Navigating Nature-Based Solutions in a Multi-Scale, Social–Ecological Urban Planning Context: A Case Study of Flood Protection in the City of Gothenburg, Sweden
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2024 (English)In: Land, E-ISSN 2073-445X, Vol. 13, no 2, article id 143Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Due to unsustainable land management and climate change, floods have become more frequent and severe over the past few decades and the problem is exacerbated in urban environments. In the context of climate-proofing cities, the importance of nature-based solutions (NBSs), obtaining relevant outcomes in the form of ecosystem services, has been highlighted. Although the role of ecosystem services in building resilience against negative climate change effects is widely recognized and there is an identified need to better integrate ecosystem services into urban planning and design, this has proven difficult to operationalize. A critical limitation is that modeling is a time-consuming and costly exercise. The purpose is to roughly estimate the ecosystem service of water run-off mitigation through simplified, cost-effective, and user-friendly modelling at three nested biophysical scales, under four climate change scenarios. Using the Swedish city of Gothenburg as an example, we propose an approach for navigating NBS-oriented flooding adaptation strategies, by quantifying the ecosystem service of water run-off mitigation at three nested biophysical scales, under four climate change scenarios, hence, proposing an approach for how to navigate nature-based solutions in a multi-scale, social–ecological urban planning context against present and future flooding events. Our findings validate the effectiveness of employing an ecosystem service approach to better comprehend the significant climate change issue of flooding through user-friendly and cost-efficient modeling.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2024
Keywords
urban green space; flooding; nature-based solutions; ecosystem services; water run-off mitigation; climate change; InVEST model
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Sustainable Urban Development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-43764 (URN)10.3390/land13020143 (DOI)
Funder
Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research, DIA 2019/28
Available from: 2024-02-06 Created: 2024-02-06 Last updated: 2024-02-09Bibliographically approved
Marcus, L. & Colding, J. (2024). Placing Urban Renewal in the Context of the Resilience Adaptive Cycle. Land, 13(1), Article ID 8.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Placing Urban Renewal in the Context of the Resilience Adaptive Cycle
2024 (English)In: Land, E-ISSN 2073-445X, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Resilience thinking provides valuable insights into the dynamics of complex adaptive systems. To achieve resilience in urban systems, it can be fruitful to delve into the intricacies of resilience processes. This paper theorizes about how the specific characteristics of resilient systems can be integrated into the spatial design of cities. Emphasizing the importance of the built form and spatial systems in maintaining order within urban processes, we focus on how adaptive renewal cycles can be applied to various systems and dimensions where urban change, adaptation, and renewal occur. The paper identifies key resilient system characteristics applicable to urban spatial form and contextualizes urban renewal within the adaptive renewal cycle—a framework originally developed to capture temporal and spatial ecosystem dynamics. We integrate insights within ‘space syntax theory’, theorizing about how cities renew themselves over space and time. We discuss instances of ‘compressed resilience’ and the challenges posed by the ‘tyranny of small decisions’ in urban planning and development. In conclusion, we identify future research directions in the theory of spatial morphology and resilient urban systems, emphasizing the need for a deeper understanding of the interplay between urban processes, urban form, resilience, and adaptive renewal. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2024
Keywords
resilience; urban renewal; the adaptive renewal cycle; compressed resilience; space syntax theory; spatial morphology
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Sustainable Urban Development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-43556 (URN)10.3390/land13010008 (DOI)001151396500001 ()2-s2.0-85183118096 (Scopus ID)
Projects
J. Gustaf Richert Foundation (SWECO)
Available from: 2024-01-09 Created: 2024-01-09 Last updated: 2024-02-09Bibliographically approved
Pan, H., Page, J., Shi, R., Cong, C., Cai, Z., Barthel, S., . . . Kalantari, Z. (2023). Contribution of prioritized urban nature-based solutions allocation to carbon neutrality. Nature Climate Change, 13, 862-870
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contribution of prioritized urban nature-based solutions allocation to carbon neutrality
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2023 (English)In: Nature Climate Change, ISSN 1758-678X, E-ISSN 1758-6798, Vol. 13, p. 862-870Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nature-based solutions (NBS) are essential for carbon-neutral cities, yet how to effectively allocate them remains a question. Carbon neutrality requires city-led climate action plans that incorporate both indirect and direct contributions of NBS. Here we assessed the carbon emissions mitigation potential of NBS in European cities, focusing particularly on commonly overlooked indirect pathways, for example, human behavioural interventions and resource savings. Assuming maximum theoretical implementation, NBS in the residential, transport and industrial sectors could reduce urban carbon emissions by up to 25%. Spatially prioritizing different types of NBS in 54 major European Union cities could reduce anthropogenic carbon emissions by on average 17.4%. Coupling NBS with other existing measures in Representative Concentration Pathway scenarios could reduce total carbon emissions by 57.3% in 2030, with both indirect pathways and sequestration. Our results indicate that carbon neutrality will be near for some pioneering cities by 2030, while three can achieve it completely. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-42798 (URN)10.1038/s41558-023-01737-x (DOI)001033797500004 ()2-s2.0-85165193769 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2021-00293Swedish Research Council Formas, 2021-00416
Available from: 2023-08-01 Created: 2023-08-01 Last updated: 2023-08-15Bibliographically approved
Berghauser Pont, M., Barthel, S., Colding, J., Gren, Å., Legeby, A. & Marcus, L. (2022). Editorial: Social-ecological urbanism: Developing discourse, institutions and urban form for the design of resilient social-ecological systems in cities. Frontiers in Built Environment, 8, Article ID 982681.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial: Social-ecological urbanism: Developing discourse, institutions and urban form for the design of resilient social-ecological systems in cities
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2022 (English)In: Frontiers in Built Environment, E-ISSN 2297-3362, Vol. 8, article id 982681Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers, 2022
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Sustainable Urban Development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-39851 (URN)10.3389/fbuil.2022.982681 (DOI)000891672800001 ()2-s2.0-85138285332 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-08-30 Created: 2022-08-30 Last updated: 2022-12-15Bibliographically approved
Colding, J., Samuelsson, K., Marcus, L., Gren, Å., Legeby, A., Berghauser Pont, M. & Barthel, S. (2022). Frontiers in Social–Ecological Urbanism. Land, 11(6), Article ID 929.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Frontiers in Social–Ecological Urbanism
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2022 (English)In: Land, E-ISSN 2073-445X, Vol. 11, no 6, article id 929Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper describes a new approach in urban ecological design, referred to as social- ecological urbanism (SEU). It draws from research in resilience thinking and space syntax in the analysis of relationships between urban processes and urban form at the microlevel of cities, where social and ecological services are directly experienced by urban dwellers. The paper elaborates on three types of media for urban designers to intervene in urban systems, including urban form, institutions, and discourse, that together function as a significant enabler of urban change. The paper ends by presenting four future research frontiers with a potential to advance the field of social-ecological urbanism: (1) urban density and critical biodiversity thresholds, (2) human and non-human movement in urban space, (3) the retrofitting of urban design, and (4) reversing the trend of urban ecological illiteracy through affordance designs that connect people with nature and with each other.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
social-ecological systems, urban design, climate-change adaptation, ecosystem services, cognitive resilience building
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-39478 (URN)10.3390/land11060929 (DOI)000816197600001 ()2-s2.0-85132749647 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2017-00937Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-01193Swedish Research Council Formas, 2018-00281Stockholm County Council, 2016-01193
Available from: 2022-07-07 Created: 2022-07-07 Last updated: 2023-02-06Bibliographically approved
Hsu, A., Logan, K., Qadir, M., Booysen, M. (., Montero, A. M., Tong, K. (. .., . . . Kılkış, Ş. (2022). Opportunities and barriers to net-zero cities. One Earth, 5(7), 739-744
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Opportunities and barriers to net-zero cities
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2022 (English)In: One Earth, ISSN 2590-3330, E-ISSN 2590-3322, Vol. 5, no 7, p. 739-744Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Today, more than 700 cities worldwide have made net-zero pledges. Managing these bold targets, however, is not easy given the complexity of urban systems. Although holistic mitigation efforts are vital, individual sectors are likely to face their own challenges and require tailor-made solutions. This Voices asks: what are the challenges and opportunities in transforming cities toward net-zero carbon emissions?

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-39695 (URN)10.1016/j.oneear.2022.06.013 (DOI)000838639500002 ()
Available from: 2022-08-15 Created: 2022-08-15 Last updated: 2022-08-25Bibliographically approved
Andersson, E., Grimm, N. B., Lewis, J. A., Redman, C. L., Barthel, S., Colding, J. & Elmqvist, T. (2022). Urban climate resilience through hybrid infrastructure. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, 55, Article ID 101158.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urban climate resilience through hybrid infrastructure
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2022 (English)In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 55, article id 101158Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Urban infrastructure will require transformative changes to adapt to changing disturbance patterns. We ask what new opportunities hybrid infrastructure—built environments coupled with landscape-scale biophysical structures and processes—offer for building different layers of resilience critical for dealing with increased variation in the frequency, magnitude and different phases of climate-related disturbances. With its more diverse components and different internal logics, hybrid infrastructure opens up alternative and additive ways of building resilience for and through critical infrastructure, by providing a wider range of functions and responses. Second, hybrid infrastructure points toward greater opportunities for ongoing (re)design at the landscape level, where structure and function can be constantly renegotiated and recombined.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-38048 (URN)10.1016/j.cosust.2022.101158 (DOI)000819918200002 ()2-s2.0-85125178585 (Scopus ID)
Note

This research was supported by the 2015-2016 BiodivERsA COFUND project ENABLE, funded by the national funders the Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences, and Spatial Planning; the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency; the German Aerospace Center; the National Science Centre; the Research Council of Norway; and the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, and through the US National Science Foundation grants no. 1444755, 1832016, and 1934933. Andersson was also supported by the NordForsk Sustainable Urban Development and Smart Cities program through the project SMARTer Greener Cities, grant no. 95377. We also thank Dr A degrees sa Gren for contributions to the ideation and early conceptualization of the paper.

Available from: 2022-03-07 Created: 2022-03-07 Last updated: 2022-07-15Bibliographically approved
Colding, J., Barthel, S., Ljung, R., Eriksson, F. & Sjöberg, S. (2022). Urban commons and collective action to address climate change. Social Inclusion, 10(1), 103-114
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urban commons and collective action to address climate change
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2022 (English)In: Social Inclusion, ISSN 2183-2803, E-ISSN 2183-2803, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 103-114Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change and the coupled loss of ecosystem services pose major collective action problems in that all individuals would benefit from better cooperation to address these problems but conflicting interests and/or incomplete knowledge discourage joint action. Adopting an inductive and multi‐layered approach, drawing upon the authors’ previous research on urban commons, we here summarize key insights on environmentally oriented urban commons and elaborate on what role they have in instigating climate‐proofing activities in urban areas. We deal with three types of urban commons, i.e., “urban green commons,” “coworking spaces,” and “community climate commons.” We describe how allotment gardens, community gardens, and other types of urban green commons contribute to environmental learning that may boost under‐ standing of environmental issues and which constitute important learning arenas for climate‐change mitigation and adap‐ tation. We also deal with the newly emerging phenomenon of coworking spaces that share many essential institutional attributes of urban commons and which can work for climate‐change mitigation through the benefits provided by a shar‐ ing economy and through reduction of domestic transportation and commuting distance. Community climate commons represent commons where local communities can mobilize together to create shared low‐carbon assets and which hold the potential to empower certain segments and civil society groups so that they can have greater influence and ownership of the transformation of reaching net‐zero carbon goals. We conclude this article by identifying some critical determinants for the up‐scaling of environmentally oriented urban commons.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cogitatio, 2022
Keywords
civic society; climate change; collective action; community climate commons; coworking spaces; mobilization; urban commons; urban green commons
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Sustainable Urban Development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-37630 (URN)10.17645/si.v10i1.4862 (DOI)000761001000003 ()2-s2.0-85124990145 (Scopus ID)
Projects
FairtransUrban Commons
Funder
Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental ResearchSwedish Research Council Formas
Note

This research has been supported through a grant facilitated by the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research (Mistra) and FORMAS, within the research program Fair Transformation to a Fossil Free Future (FAIRTRANS), hosted by the Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University. The work is also supported through means within the research program Urban Commons at the University of Gävle.

Available from: 2022-01-14 Created: 2022-01-14 Last updated: 2022-03-25Bibliographically approved
Barthel, S., Colding, J., Hiswåls, A.-S., Thalén, P. & Turunen, P. (2022). Urban green commons for socially sustainable cities and communities. Nordic Social Work Research, 12(2), 310-322
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urban green commons for socially sustainable cities and communities
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2022 (English)In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 310-322Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In these times of global pandemics and climate crisis, social sustainability has become a crucial issue within diverse sectors and disciplines. This article aims to broaden the discussions on social sustainability in general, and in relation to community work within professional social work in particular.

By means of a cross-disciplinary bricolage approach – with a focus on the commons – we aim to construct a holistic view of urban social sustainability. Beginning with the Anthropocene concept, which recognizes the human impact on the Earth’s natural systems and hence highlights the need to include the natural environment as a determinant of good and fair living conditions for all, we remix arguments and examples relating to social sustainability with environmental and spatial dimensions to develop an urban green commons. Our cross-disciplinary perspective extends beyond contemporary social policy by bringing together natural resource management, public health, and spiritual aspects of the commons. In order to fit the plurality of urban contexts across the planet, further critical deliberations are needed, focusing on social sustainability and collective action for sustainable change in each context. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
natural resource management, social work, spirituality, wellbeing, spatial planning, equity
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Sustainable Urban Development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-37411 (URN)10.1080/2156857x.2021.1947876 (DOI)001026169500009 ()2-s2.0-85128713552 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-11-22 Created: 2021-11-22 Last updated: 2023-09-08Bibliographically approved
Brandt, S. A., Lim, N. J., Colding, J. & Barthel, S. (2021). Mapping Flood Risk Uncertainty Zones in Support of Urban Resilience Planning. Urban Planning, 6(3), 258-271
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mapping Flood Risk Uncertainty Zones in Support of Urban Resilience Planning
2021 (English)In: Urban Planning, E-ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 258-271Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

River flooding and urbanization are processes of different character that take place worldwide. As the latter tends to make the consequences of the former worse, together with the uncertainties related to future climate change and flood‐risk modeling, there is a need to both use existing tools and develop new ones that help the management and planning of urban environments. In this article a prototype tool, based on estimated maximum land cover roughness variation, the slope of the ground, and the quality of the used digital elevation models, and that can produce flood ‘uncertainty zones’ of varying width around modeled flood boundaries, is presented. The concept of uncertainty, which urban planners often fail to consider in the spatial planning process, changes from something very difficult into an advantage in this way. Not only may these uncertainties be easier to understand by the urban planners, but the uncertainties may also function as a communication tool between the planners and other stakeholders. Because flood risk is something that urban planners always need to consider, these uncertainty zones can function both as buffer areas against floods, and as blue‐green designs of significant importance for a variety of ecosystem services. As the Earth is warming and the world is urbanizing at rates and scales unprecedented in history, we believe that new tools for urban resilience planning are not only urgently needed, but also will have a positive impact on urban planning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lisbon, Portugal: Cogitatio, 2021
Keywords
digital elevation models, ecosystem services, flood map uncertainties, GIS tool, river floods, urban resilience
National Category
Civil Engineering
Research subject
Sustainable Urban Development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-36847 (URN)10.17645/up.v6i3.4073 (DOI)000708511600004 ()2-s2.0-85113766289 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Bettering life through integrative GIS (BIG)
Available from: 2021-07-28 Created: 2021-07-28 Last updated: 2023-01-03Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7644-7448

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