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Januario, L., Mathiassen, S. E., Bergström, G. & Jackson, J. (2024). Did the COVID-19 pandemic influence inequality in self-reported work environment conditions based on gender and place of birth? A study of a Swedish commercial laundromat. Applied Ergonomics, 114, Article ID 104113.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Did the COVID-19 pandemic influence inequality in self-reported work environment conditions based on gender and place of birth? A study of a Swedish commercial laundromat
2024 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 114, article id 104113Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We evaluated differences in work environment conditions and health by gender and place of birth in a commercial laundromat prior to (baseline) and at the end of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic (follow-up). Using survey data, including dimensions from the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, from forty-one workers, we assessed work environment conditions and health at baseline, follow-up and in change scores between baseline and follow-up. At baseline, men and women reported similar scores, while foreign-born (FB) workers reported better work environment conditions than Swedish-born (SB) workers. During the pandemic, conditions generally declined for all workers, but FB reported smaller declines than SB. A consistent inequality hierarchy across the 4 groups was not clear at baseline, follow-up or in change scores between time points. The study suggests potential cultural differences may exist in how work environment conditions are experienced. This should be considered in future studies and when managing future crises

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
hospital laundry service; SARS-CoV-2; psychosocial factors
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work, Inkluderande arbetsliv; Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-41113 (URN)10.1016/j.apergo.2023.104113 (DOI)001060029800001 ()37611535 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85168417633 (Scopus ID)
Funder
AFA Insurance, 200243
Available from: 2023-02-22 Created: 2023-02-22 Last updated: 2024-01-31Bibliographically approved
Gerger, H., Macri, E. M., Jackson, J., Elbers, R. G., van Rijn, R. M., Søgaard, K., . . . Chiarotto, A. (2024). Physical and psychosocial work-related exposures and the incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome: A systematic review of prospective studies. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 117, Article ID 104211.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical and psychosocial work-related exposures and the incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome: A systematic review of prospective studies
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2024 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 117, article id 104211Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This systematic review summarizes the evidence on associations between physical and psychosocial work-related exposures and the development of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Relevant databases were searched up to January 2020 for cohort studies reporting associations between work-related physical or psychosocial risk factors and the incidence of CTS. Two independent reviewers selected eligible studies, extracted relevant data, and assessed risk of bias (RoB). We identified fourteen articles for inclusion which reported data from nine cohort studies. Eight reported associations between physical exposure and the incidence of CTS and five reported associations between psychosocial exposures and the incidence of CTS. Quality items were generally rated as unclear or low RoB. Work-related physical exposure factors including high levels of repetition, velocity, and a combination of multiple physical exposures were associated with an increased risk of developing CTS. No other consistent associations were observed for physical or psychosocial exposures at work and CTS incidence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Occupational medicine, Cohort studies, CTS
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40596 (URN)10.1016/j.apergo.2023.104211 (DOI)001155094500001 ()38199092 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85181771386 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-12-09 Created: 2022-12-09 Last updated: 2024-02-22Bibliographically approved
Jackson, J., Mathiassen, S. E., Rydström, K. & Johansson, K. (2024). Protocol for an observational study of working conditions and musculoskeletal health in Swedish online retail warehousing from the perspective of sex/gender and place of birth. PLOS ONE, 19(2), Article ID e0297569.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Protocol for an observational study of working conditions and musculoskeletal health in Swedish online retail warehousing from the perspective of sex/gender and place of birth
2024 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 19, no 2, article id e0297569Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

European and International sustainable development agendas aim to reduce inequalities in working conditions and work-related health, yet disparate occupational health outcomes are evident between both men and women and domestic- and foreign-born workers. In Sweden, major growth in online retail warehousing has increased occupational opportunities for foreign-born workers. The rapid change has left research lagging on working conditions, i.e., employment conditions, facility design, work organisation, physical and psychosocial work environment conditions, and their effects on worker health. Further, no known studies have considered patterns of inequality related to these factors. The overall aim of this study is to describe working conditions and musculoskeletal health in online retail warehousing, determine the extent to which differences exist related to sex/gender and place of birth (as a proxy for race/ethnicity), and examine factors at the organisational and individual levels to understand why any differences exist.

Three online retail warehouses, each employing 50-150 operations workers performing receiving, order picking, order packing and dispatching tasks will be recruited. Warehouses will, to the extent possible, differ in their extent of digital technology use. Employment conditions, facility design (including digital tool use), work organisation, physical and psychosocial work environment conditions and worker health will be assessed by survey, interview and technical measurements. Analysis of quantitative data stratified by sex and place of birth will consider the extent to which inequalities exist. Focus group interviews with operations employees and in-depth interviews with managers, union and health and safety representatives will be conducted to assess how employee working conditions and musculoskeletal health are related to inequality regimes of sex/gender and/or race/ethnicity in organisational processes and practices in online retail warehousing. The study is pre-registered with the Open Science Framework.

This study will describe working conditions and health in online retail warehouse workers and consider the extent to which patterns of inequality exist based on sex/gender and place of birth.

Keywords
inequality, heart rate variability, posture, physical activity profiles, race, ethnicity, work task, psychosocial, COPSOQ, intersectionality
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work, Inkluderande arbetsliv; Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-41047 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0297569 (DOI)38394162 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-01051
Available from: 2023-02-08 Created: 2023-02-08 Last updated: 2024-02-26Bibliographically approved
Rydström, K., Jackson, J., Johansson, K. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2023). A systematic review of work organization, work environment and employment conditions in warehousing in relation to gender and race/ethnicity. Annals of Work Exposures and Health, 67(4), 430-447
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A systematic review of work organization, work environment and employment conditions in warehousing in relation to gender and race/ethnicity
2023 (English)In: Annals of Work Exposures and Health, ISSN 2398-7308 , E-ISSN 2398-7316 , Vol. 67, no 4, p. 430-447Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives. Studies in the goods supply chain in areas outside of warehousing show evidence of gender and racial/ethnic inequalities in working conditions (i.e., in work organization, work environment and employment conditions). This review aimed to identify, summarize, and discuss research focused on inequality in warehousing and its effects on warehouse working conditions. In the review, racial/ethnic inequality includes inequality related to country of birth and (im)migration status.

Methods. We performed a systematic search in the Scopus and Web of Science databases to identify warehouse studies that addressed working conditions and (in)equality at a workplace level. Screening of records was performed using the Rayyan systematic review tool. Risk of bias was assessed according to established methods and checklists. 

Results. Database searches yielded 4910 articles. After title-abstract-keyword and full-text screenings, 21articles were included. Results showed inequality based on gender and race/ethnicity in both work organization (different tasks were performed by different groups of employees), work environment conditions (physical and psychosocial aspects differed) and employment conditions (disparate employment types and incomes between groups of employees). Health differences, as a possible result of unequal working conditions, were evident between different racial/ethnic groups of employees. A hierarchy that included both gender and race/ethnicity was found, with (im)migrant and racialized women positioned at the bottom.

Conclusions. We found evidence that gender and race/ethnicity influenced work organization, work environment conditions, and employment conditions. Evidence was found for an intersection between gender and race/ethnicity. To improve working conditions, and subsequently occupational health, we encourage researchers to simultaneously consider gender and race/ethnicity factors at work, and to consider both why inequality is present and how it impacts working conditions in future studies of warehousing, particularly in online retailing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford Academic, 2023
Keywords
Distribution center; fulfillment center; occupational health; inequality regimes; working conditions
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work; Intelligent Industry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-38233 (URN)10.1093/annweh/wxac098 (DOI)000919276800001 ()36715660 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85160681304 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-01051
Available from: 2022-03-23 Created: 2022-03-23 Last updated: 2023-06-12Bibliographically approved
Jackson, J., Sund, M., Barlari Lobos, G., Melin, L. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2023). Assessing the efficacy of a job rotation for improving occupational physical and psychosocial work environment, musculoskeletal health, social equality, production quality, and resilience at a commercial laundromat: Protocol for a longitudinal case study. BMJ Open, 13(5), Article ID e067633.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing the efficacy of a job rotation for improving occupational physical and psychosocial work environment, musculoskeletal health, social equality, production quality, and resilience at a commercial laundromat: Protocol for a longitudinal case study
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2023 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 5, article id e067633Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Job rotation is a work organization strategy used to reduce work‐related exposures and musculoskeletal complaints, yet evidence for the efficacy of the approach is weak. Mismatch between job rotation and company needs, lack of full implementation, lack of exposure variation in included tasks, and failure to assess variation may underlie inconclusive research findings to date. The study aims to develop a job rotation with company stakeholders, perform a process evaluation of the implementation, and determine the extent to which the intervention improves the physical and psychosocial work environment, indicators of health, gender and social equality among workers, and production quality and resilience.

Methods and analysis: Approximately 60 production workers at a Swedish commercial laundromat will be recruited. Physical and psychosocial work environment conditions, health, productivity and gender and social equality will be assessed pre‐ and post‐ intervention using surveys, accelerometers, heart rate, electromyography and focus groups. A task‐based exposure matrix will be constructed, and exposure variation estimated at the level of the individual worker pre‐ and post‐ intervention. An implementation process evaluation will be conducted. Job rotation efficacy will be assessed in terms of improvement in work environment conditions, health, gender and social inequality, and production quality and resilience. This study will provide novel information on the effects of the job rotation on physical and psychosocial work environment conditions, production quality and rate, health, and gender and social inequality among blue‐collar workers in a highly multicultural workplace.

Ethics and dissemination: The study received approval from the Swedish Ethical Review Authority. Results of the project will be shared directly with the employees, managers and union representatives from the participating company, other relevant labour market stakeholders, and with researchers at national and international conferences and via scientific publication.

Trial registration: The study is pre‐registered with the Open Science Framework (https://osf.io/zmdc8/).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ, 2023
Keywords
repetitive work, variation, work task organization, work rotation, job rotation, musculoskeletal health, intervention, implementation, co‐creation, co‐created program logic, process and outcome evaluation
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work; Intelligent Industry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-38429 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2022-067633 (DOI)001001500800007 ()37173106 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85159738922 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-01761
Available from: 2022-04-20 Created: 2022-04-20 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Gerger, H., Søgaard, K., Macri, E., Jackson, J., Elbers, R. G., vanRijn, R., . . . Burdorf, A. (2023). Exposure to hand-arm vibrations in the workplace and the occurrence of hand-arm vibration syndrome, Dupuytren’s disease, and hypothenar hammer syndrome. A systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, 20(7), 257-267
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exposure to hand-arm vibrations in the workplace and the occurrence of hand-arm vibration syndrome, Dupuytren’s disease, and hypothenar hammer syndrome. A systematic review and meta-analysis
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, ISSN 1545-9624, E-ISSN 1545-9632, Vol. 20, no 7, p. 257-267Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study provides an overview on the relationships between exposure to work-related, hand-arm vibration and the occurrence of pre-defined disorders of the hands. We searched Medline, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Central, and PsycINFO for cross-sectional and longitudinal studies on the association between work-related vibration exposure and the occurrence of hand-arm vibration syndrome (including vibration-induced white finger), Dupuytren’s contracture, or hypothenar hammer syndrome. We used a 16-item checklist for assessing risk of bias. We present results narratively, and we conducted random effects meta-analyses if possible. We included 10 studies with more than 24,381 participants. Our results showed statistically significant associations between the exposure to hand-arm vibrations and the occurrence of the selected disorders, with pooled odds ratios ranging between 1.35 (95% CI: 1.28 to 2.80) and 3.43 (95% CI: 2.10 to 5.59). Considerable between-study hetereogeneity was observed. Our analyses show that exposure to vibrating tools at work is associated with an increased risk for the occurrence of selected disorders of the hands. Due to the majority of studies being cross-sectional, no firm conclusion is possible regarding causal relationships between vibration exposure and disorder occurrence. Future research should specifically address whether reducing the exposure to hand-held vibrating tools at work reduces the incidence of the disorders of the hands investigated in this systematic review.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Hand-arm vibration, Meta-analysis, Musculoskeletal disorders, Systematic medicine
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-38432 (URN)10.1080/15459624.2023.2197634 (DOI)000985320300001 ()37000463 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85159055442 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-04-20 Created: 2022-04-20 Last updated: 2023-08-16Bibliographically approved
Rydström, K., Johansson, K., Sardello, T., Jackson, J. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2023). Force of Nature or Force of the Market? On precarity in online retail warehousing. Work, Employment and Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Force of Nature or Force of the Market? On precarity in online retail warehousing
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2023 (English)In: Work, Employment and Society, ISSN 0950-0170, E-ISSN 1469-8722Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work; Health-Promoting Work, Inkluderande arbetsliv
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-43502 (URN)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-01051
Available from: 2023-12-29 Created: 2023-12-29 Last updated: 2024-01-02Bibliographically approved
Chiarotto, A., Gerger, H., van Rijn, R. M., Elbers, R. G., Søgaard, K., Macri, E. M., . . . Koes, B. W. (2023). Physical and psychosocial work-related exposures and the occurrence of disorders of the elbow: A systematic review. Applied Ergonomics, 108, Article ID 103952.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical and psychosocial work-related exposures and the occurrence of disorders of the elbow: A systematic review
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2023 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 108, article id 103952Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This systematic review updates a previous systematic review on work-related physical and psychosocial risk factors for elbow disorders. Medline, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Central and PsycINFO were searched for studies on associations between work-related physical or psychosocial risk factors and the occurrence of elbow disorders. Two independent reviewers selected eligible studies and assessed risk of bias (RoB). Results of studies were synthesized narratively. We identified 17 new studies and lateral epicondylitis was the most studied disorder (13 studies). Five studies had a prospective cohort design, eight were cross-sectional and four were case-control. Only one study had no items rated as high RoB. Combined physical exposure indicators (e.g. physical exertion combined with elbow movement) were associated with the occurrence of lateral epicondylitis. No other consistent associations were observed for other physical and psychosocial exposures. These results prevent strong conclusions regarding associations between work-related exposures, and the occurrence of elbow disorders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Work-related risk factors, Lateral epicondylitis, Medial epicondylitis
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40582 (URN)10.1016/j.apergo.2022.103952 (DOI)000996472800001 ()36493677 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85143981043 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-12-07 Created: 2022-12-07 Last updated: 2023-06-16Bibliographically approved
Versloot, A., Jackson, J., van Rijn, R. M., Elbers, R. G., Søgaard, K., Macri, E. M., . . . Gerger, H. (2023). Physical and Psychosocial Work-related Exposures and the Occurrence of Disorders of the Shoulder: A Systematic Review Update.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical and Psychosocial Work-related Exposures and the Occurrence of Disorders of the Shoulder: A Systematic Review Update
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2023 (English)In: Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-42804 (URN)
Available from: 2023-08-08 Created: 2023-08-08 Last updated: 2023-08-14Bibliographically approved
Jackson, J., Liv, P., Sayed-Noor, A. S., Punnett, L. & Wahlström, J. (2023). Risk factors for surgically treated cervical spondylosis in male construction workers: a 20-year prospective study. The spine journal, 23(1), 136-145
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk factors for surgically treated cervical spondylosis in male construction workers: a 20-year prospective study
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2023 (English)In: The spine journal, ISSN 1529-9430, E-ISSN 1878-1632, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 136-145Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Context

Degenerative changes due to cervical spondylosis (CS) can detrimentally affect work ability and quality of life yet understanding of how physical exposure affects disease progression is limited.PurposeTo assess the associations between occupational physical exposures and occurrence of surgically treated cervical spondylosis (ST-CS) and early exit from the labour market via disability pension.

Study Design/Setting

Prospective register study with 20 year follow-up period.Patient SampleSwedish construction workers participating in a national health surveillance project conducted between 1971-1993.

Outcome Measures

Surgically treated cervical spondylosis (ST-CS) and early labour market exit at a minimum rate of 25% time on disability pension.

Methods

Associations between occupational physical exposures (job exposure matrix) and subsequent ST-CS (National Hospital in-patient register) and early labour market exit via disability pension (Swedish Social Insurance Agency register) were assessed in a cohort of male construction workers (n=237,699).

Results

A total of 1381 ST-CS cases were present and a 20-year incidence rate of 35.1 cases per 100,000 person years (95% confidence interval (CI) 33.2-36.9). Increased relative risk (RR) for ST-CS was found for workers exposed to non-neutral (RR 1.40, 95% CI 1.15-1.69) and awkward neck postures (1.52, 1.19-1.95), working with the hands above shoulder height (1.30, 1.06-1.60), and high upper extremity loading (1.35, 1.15-1.59). Increased risk was also present for workers who reported frequent neck (3.06, 2.18-4.30) and upper back (3.84, 2.57-5.73) pain in the 12 months prior to survey. Among workers with elevated arm exposure, higher risk was seen in those who also had more frequent neck pain. ST-CS cases took early retirement more often (41.3%) and at a younger age (53 years) than the total study cohort (14.8% and 56 years of age, respectively).

Conclusions

Occupational exposure to non-neutral neck postures, work with hands above shoulders and high loads born through the upper extremities increased the risk for ST-CS and early retirement due to disability. Decreasing postural and load exposure is salient for primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of CS. Neck pain was shown to be a prognostic factor for ST-CS, which stresses the importance of acting early and taking preventative action to reduce workplace exposure, and the need for systematic medical check-ups within primary or occupational care to mitigate disease progression and early labour market exit due to disability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
job exposure matrix, neck pain, upper-back pain, early-retirement, hand tools, static work, repetitive.
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-38430 (URN)10.1016/j.spinee.2022.08.009 (DOI)001015660600001 ()36028215 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85138532705 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-01016
Available from: 2022-04-20 Created: 2022-04-20 Last updated: 2023-09-08Bibliographically approved
Projects
Effekter av en extern kris på arbetsmiljö, hälsa och jämlikhet bland svensk och utlandsfödd arbetskraft: en fallstudie på ett tvätteri [200243]; University of Gävle
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2939-0236

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