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Bergström, Gunnar, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0161-160x
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Publications (10 of 52) Show all publications
Januario, L., Mathiassen, S. E., Bergström, G. & Jackson, J. (2024). Did the COVID-19 pandemic influence inequality in self-reported work environment conditions based on gender and place of birth? A study of a Swedish commercial laundromat. Applied Ergonomics, 114, Article ID 104113.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Did the COVID-19 pandemic influence inequality in self-reported work environment conditions based on gender and place of birth? A study of a Swedish commercial laundromat
2024 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 114, article id 104113Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We evaluated differences in work environment conditions and health by gender and place of birth in a commercial laundromat prior to (baseline) and at the end of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic (follow-up). Using survey data, including dimensions from the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, from forty-one workers, we assessed work environment conditions and health at baseline, follow-up and in change scores between baseline and follow-up. At baseline, men and women reported similar scores, while foreign-born (FB) workers reported better work environment conditions than Swedish-born (SB) workers. During the pandemic, conditions generally declined for all workers, but FB reported smaller declines than SB. A consistent inequality hierarchy across the 4 groups was not clear at baseline, follow-up or in change scores between time points. The study suggests potential cultural differences may exist in how work environment conditions are experienced. This should be considered in future studies and when managing future crises

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
hospital laundry service; SARS-CoV-2; psychosocial factors
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work, Inkluderande arbetsliv; Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-41113 (URN)10.1016/j.apergo.2023.104113 (DOI)001060029800001 ()37611535 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85168417633 (Scopus ID)
Funder
AFA Insurance, 200243
Available from: 2023-02-22 Created: 2023-02-22 Last updated: 2024-01-31Bibliographically approved
Casely-Hayford, J., Lindqvist, P., Björklund, C., Bergström, G. & Kwak, L. (2024). Enculturating a Protective Professional Community: Processes of Teacher Retention in a Swedish Hard-to-Staff School. Education Sciences, 14(1), Article ID 114.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enculturating a Protective Professional Community: Processes of Teacher Retention in a Swedish Hard-to-Staff School
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2024 (English)In: Education Sciences, E-ISSN 2227-7102, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 114Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study presented a positive deviant case: a Swedish hard-to-staff school which has had a low rate of teacher turnover over time. In line with the purpose of studying positive deviance in organisations, our exploratory inquiry was geared towards understanding how and why ‘at-risk’ teachers, i.e., teachers who teach in subjects which are known to have high levels of staffing difficulties in Sweden, stayed at this particular school. Using a modified grounded theory approach, our results suggested that teachers remained at the school due to being embedded in a protective professional community that was enculturated by different expressions of collegiality. Finally, these findings are discussed in relation to the theoretical concepts of teachers’ job embeddedness and social capital. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2024
Keywords
collegiality; hard-to-staff school; job embeddedness; teacher community; teacher retention; teacher turnover
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-43752 (URN)10.3390/educsci14010114 (DOI)001149323300001 ()2-s2.0-85183135110 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, STYA-2019/0004
Available from: 2024-02-05 Created: 2024-02-05 Last updated: 2024-02-09Bibliographically approved
Nordlinder, C., Bergström, G., Tham, P. & Öberg, P. (2024). Individual, family, job, and organizational factors associated with retirement intentions among older long-term care workers: A systematic review. Geriatric Nursing, 56, 83-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individual, family, job, and organizational factors associated with retirement intentions among older long-term care workers: A systematic review
2024 (English)In: Geriatric Nursing, ISSN 0197-4572, E-ISSN 1528-3984, Vol. 56, p. 83-93Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This systematic review synthesized prior quantitative research on individual, family, job, and organizational factors associated with retirement intentions (RI) among older long-term care (LTC) workers. Seven databases were searched for peer-reviewed studies. RI were defined as early (<65 years) or late (>65 years). To assess the methodological quality, we used JBI's checklists. The PRISMA statement guided this review. After duplicates were removed, 4 489 records were identified. A final sample of six articles was selected as eligible for inclusion. Current findings show weak social support, high physical job demands, and type of LTC occupation as important determinants for early RI. Strong social support and good job resources are important determinants fore late RI. In contrast to earlier research on other groups of older workers, this review shows no statistically associations between health nor emotional job demands and early RI for LTC workers. The results are discussed using the JD-R theory.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Older people, Long-term care, Workforce issues, Retirement planning, Systematic review
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-43774 (URN)10.1016/j.gerinurse.2024.01.005 (DOI)38325072 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85184029819 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-02-08 Created: 2024-02-08 Last updated: 2024-02-19Bibliographically approved
Ahmadi, E., Lundqvist, D., Bergström, G. & Macassa, G. (2023). A qualitative study of factors that managers in small companies consider important for their wellbeing. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 18(1), Article ID 2286669.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A qualitative study of factors that managers in small companies consider important for their wellbeing
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 2286669Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

Given the importance of small businesses for society, and the significance of managers’ wellbeing for employee health, leadership, and business performance, more knowledge is needed on the sources of managers’ wellbeing. This study explored factors within the small business context that were perceived by managers to hinder or enable their wellbeing.

Methods

Data were collected through qualitative semi-structured interviews with 20 managers from 12 small companies, and analysed with content analysis.

Results

The factors that these managers in small businesses experienced as enhancing or hindering their personal wellbeing covered five categories: demands and resources in the daily managerial work, achievement of results, social factors, organizational factors, and individual factors.

Conclusions

The specific context of managerial work in small companies encompasses unique factors. For instance, the small company managers’ wellbeing was affected by vulnerability due to the smallness of the business and the absence of available resources. Simultaneously, a small company context provided a strong social climate and close relationships with employees and customers that strengthened the managers’ wellbeing. The findings suggest that the availability of financial, personnel, and organizational resources varies between small companies of different size, which may have implications for small business managers’ work and wellbeing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Managers, small businesses, qualitative content analysis, wellbeing, demands, resources
National Category
Sociology Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-43352 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2023.2286669 (DOI)38010829 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85178210827 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-30 Created: 2023-11-30 Last updated: 2024-01-31Bibliographically approved
Holmlund, L., Bültmann, U., Bergström, G., Warnqvist, A. & Björk Brämberg, E. (2023). Are psychosocial work factors and work-home interference associated with time to first full return-to-work after sick leave due to common mental disorders?. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 96, 747-755
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are psychosocial work factors and work-home interference associated with time to first full return-to-work after sick leave due to common mental disorders?
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2023 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 96, p. 747-755Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

To (1) examine the time to first full return-to-work (RTW), and (2) investigate whether psychosocial work factors and work-home interference are associated with time to first full RTW after sick leave due to common mental disorders (CMDs).

Methods

The cohort study comprised 162 employees on sick leave due to CMDs participating in a two-armed cluster-randomised controlled trial in Sweden. Baseline data consisted of a web-based questionnaire and follow-up data of repeated text messages every fourth week for 12 months. The time to first full RTW was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier Estimator. Parametric Weibull survival models with interval-censored outcomes were used to determine associations between psychosocial work factors and work-home interference with time to first full RTW. In a post hoc analysis, time-interval differences in associations for 0– ≤ 6- versus > 6–12 months were tested.

Results

During the 12-month follow-up, n = 131 (80.9%) reported a first full RTW. The median time to this RTW was 16 weeks (95% CI 12; 20). High psychological job demands, high emotional job demands, high work-to-home interference (WHI), and low social job support were independently associated with a longer time to first full RTW. Time-interval differences were found for job control and emotional job demands.

Conclusions

Psychosocial work demands and WHI are associated with a longer time to RTW after sick leave due to CMDs. Work organisations and rehabilitation practices should include accommodations for high psychological and emotional job demands during RTW, as well as pay attention to the risk of spill-over of high job demands into employees’ private lives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Determinants; Mental disorders; Return to work; Sickness absence; Survival analysis; Work factors
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-41250 (URN)10.1007/s00420-023-01970-z (DOI)000956515500002 ()36964790 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85150711384 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016–07415
Available from: 2023-03-30 Created: 2023-03-30 Last updated: 2023-06-16Bibliographically approved
Svensson, S., Mathiassen, S. E., Hallman, D., Heiden, M. & Bergström, G. (2023). Associations between telework experience and psychosocial working conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic: A cross-sectional analysis among white-collar workers in Sweden. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 65(2), e74-e82
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between telework experience and psychosocial working conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic: A cross-sectional analysis among white-collar workers in Sweden
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 65, no 2, p. e74-e82Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To determine to what extent pre-COVID-19 experience of telework was associated with perceived psychosocial working conditions (PWC; job demands, social support and influence at work) during the COVID-19 pandemic among white-collar workers in Sweden, and to determine to what extent the association depends on demographic factors, organizational tenure, and amount of computer use.

Methods: Cross-sectional questionnaire data from 603 white-collar workers were collected October-December 2020 in an industrial company.

Results: In general, telework experience was not significantly associated with PWC. Women who began teleworking due to COVID-19 reported more job demands than women not teleworking. For those who began teleworking due to COVID-19, managerial support increased with age.

Conclusion: In general, telework experience was not associated with PWC, but telework due to COVID-19 may have influenced PWC differently depending on gender and age.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WoltersKluwer, 2023
Keywords
Telework; COVID-19; Job demands; Influence at work; Social support
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work; Health-Promoting Work, Flexibelt arbete
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-39433 (URN)10.1097/JOM.0000000000002758 (DOI)000925880100008 ()36729912 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85147457310 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-01257
Available from: 2022-07-04 Created: 2022-07-04 Last updated: 2023-05-02Bibliographically approved
Ida, K., Lydia, K., Iben, A., Bergström, G., Ute, B., Kristina, H. & Elisabeth, B. B. (2023). Experiences of participating in a problem-solving intervention with workplace involvement in Swedish primary health care: a qualitative study from rehabilitation coordinator's, employee's, and manager's perspectives. BMC Public Health, 23(1), Article ID 940.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of participating in a problem-solving intervention with workplace involvement in Swedish primary health care: a qualitative study from rehabilitation coordinator's, employee's, and manager's perspectives
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2023 (English)In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 940Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Work-directed interventions that include problem-solving can reduce the number of sickness absence days. The effect of combining a problem-solving intervention with involvement of the employer is currently being tested in primary care in Sweden for employees on sickness absence due to common mental disorders (PROSA trial). The current study is part of the PROSA trial and has a two-fold aim: 1) to explore the experiences of participating in a problem-solving intervention with workplace involvement aimed at reducing sickness absence in employees with common mental disorders, delivered in Swedish primary health care, and 2) to identify facilitators of and barriers to participate in the intervention. Both aims targeted rehabilitation coordinators, employees on sickness absence, and first-line managers.

Methods

Data were collected from semi-structured interviews with participants from the PROSA intervention group; rehabilitation coordinators (n = 8), employees (n = 13), and first-line managers (n = 8). Content analysis was used to analyse the data and the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research was used to group the data according to four contextual domains. One theme describing the participation experiences was established for each domain. Facilitators and barriers for each domain and stakeholder group were identified.

Results

The stakeholders experienced the intervention as supportive in identifying problems and solutions and enabling a dialogue between them. However, the intervention was considered demanding and good relationships between the stakeholders were needed. Facilitating factors were the manual and work sheets which the coordinators were provided with, and the manager being involved early in the return-to-work process. Barriers were the number of on-site meetings, disagreements and conflicts between employees and first-line managers, and symptom severity.

Conclusions

Seeing the workplace as an integral part of the intervention by always conducting a three-part meeting enabled a dialogue that can be used to identify and address disagreements, to explain CMD symptoms, and how these can be handled at the workplace. We suggest allocating time towards developing good relationships, provide RCs with training in handling disagreements, and additional knowledge about factors in the employee’s psychosocial work environment that can impair or promote health to increase the RCs ability to support the employee and manager.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC, 2023
Keywords
Adjustment disorder; Anxiety; Common mental disorders; Depression; Primary care; Problem-solving; Sickness absence
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-41866 (URN)10.1186/s12889-023-15899-y (DOI)000994293700007 ()37226167 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85160068430 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016–07415
Available from: 2023-05-25 Created: 2023-05-25 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Brulin, E., Bjärntoft, S., Bergström, G. & Hallman, D. (2023). Gendered associations of flexible work arrangement and perceived flexibility with work–life interference: a cross-sectional mediation analysis on office workers in Sweden. Social Indicators Research, 167, 571-588
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gendered associations of flexible work arrangement and perceived flexibility with work–life interference: a cross-sectional mediation analysis on office workers in Sweden
2023 (English)In: Social Indicators Research, ISSN 0303-8300, E-ISSN 1573-0921, Vol. 167, p. 571-588Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Flexible work arrangements (FWA) may be beneficial for increasing perceived flexibility (i.e. control over when, where and how to work) and reducing interference between work and private-life, but knowledge of gendered patterns of these relationships is sparse. Drawing on gender theory, the aim of this study was to conduct gender-differentiated analyses of the associations between FWA (non-regulated work or flex-time) and work–life interference using perceived flexibility as a mediator. Survey data were collected in 2016 from a sample of 2614 employees in the Swedish Transport Administration (response rate 67%). The sample included 39.6% women and 60.4% men, 71.7% had non-regulated work and 28.3% flex-time. Associations were determined using linear mixed models and mediation analysis. Results indicated a beneficial effect of non-regulated work (referencing flex-time) on work–life interference through an increase in perceived flexibility. The indirect effect of FWA was pronounced and statistically significant in the total sample, as well as in men and women. However, in men, non-regulated work was associated with a statistically significant increase in interference (competitive mediation). Gender did not interact significantly with work arrangement nor with perceived flexibility. In conclusion, the type of FWA can result in different perceptions of flexibility which in turn may affect experiences of work–life interference. Furthermore, it should be acknowledged that both FWAs and flexibility may be experienced differently for men and women regarding interference. Thus, employers seeking to reduce employee interference should consider gender norms and individual needs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Autonomy; Flexibility; Flexible work arrangement; Mediation; Men; Sustainable work; Women; Work–life interference
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-41767 (URN)10.1007/s11205-023-03113-w (DOI)000983919700003 ()2-s2.0-85158122348 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2018-01190Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-01257Swedish Transport Administration, 2015-92392
Available from: 2023-05-15 Created: 2023-05-15 Last updated: 2023-06-16Bibliographically approved
Ahmadi, E., Lundqvist, D., Bergström, G. & Macassa, G. (2023). Managers’ and employees’ experiences of how managers’ wellbeing impacts their leadership behaviours in Swedish small businesses. Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, 75(1), 97-112
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managers’ and employees’ experiences of how managers’ wellbeing impacts their leadership behaviours in Swedish small businesses
2023 (English)In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 97-112Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:There is a growing interest in managers’ wellbeing due to the observed associations between their wellbeing and leadership behaviours, and between leadership behaviours and employees’ wellbeing. However, it is still unclear how managers’ wellbeing influences their practiced leadership across different workplace contexts, which specific behaviours are affected, and how this varies across time.

OBJECTIVE:The purpose of this study was therefore to explore managers’ and employees’ experiences and perceptions regarding the consequences of managers’ wellbeing for their leadership behaviours in small businesses.

METHODS:Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 37 participants (19 managers and 18 employees) working at 12 Swedish small firms, and analysed using content analysis.

RESULTS:The findings show that managers were more constructive when they felt well, and more passively destructive when unwell. Variations in managers’ wellbeing influenced their mood, energy level, and performance, as well as the company’s working climate. However, these destructive leadership variations did not have a substantial impact, because several protective factors were present.

CONCLUSION:This study shows that the wellbeing of managers in small businesses has perceptible consequences for their leadership behaviours. The study also shows that sustained leadership behaviours may coexist with temporary variations of these behaviours on a constructive-destructive continuum depending on the leader’s wellbeing. Overall, the findings contribute to a more nuanced and dynamic understanding of how the interaction between managers’ wellbeing and their behaviours unfolds in the particular context of small companies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press, 2023
Keywords
SME; health; managerial behaviours; wellbeing
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40705 (URN)10.3233/wor-220159 (DOI)000989666900010 ()36591688 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85159784840 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-05 Created: 2023-01-05 Last updated: 2024-01-31Bibliographically approved
Heiden, M., Hallman, D., Svensson, M., Mathiassen, S. E., Svensson, S. & Bergström, G. (2023). Mismatch between actual and preferred extent of telework: cross-sectional and prospective associations with well-being and burnout. BMC Public Health, 23, Article ID 1736.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mismatch between actual and preferred extent of telework: cross-sectional and prospective associations with well-being and burnout
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2023 (English)In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 23, article id 1736Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: This study aimed to determine whether telework mismatch, i.e., lack of fit between actual and preferred extent of telework, is cross-sectionally and prospectively associated with well-being and burnout.

Methods: A questionnaire was sent to employees in a Swedish manufacturing company in November 2020 (baseline) and September 2021 (follow-up). It contained questions about well-being (WHO-5 Well-Being Index) and burnout (Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire III), as well as the preferred extent of telework and extent of telework performed. Telework mismatch was calculated as the difference between the actual and preferred extent of telework. Change in mismatch over time was categorized as 1) less mismatch at follow-up than at baseline, 2) more mismatch at follow-up, and 3) identical levels of mismatch at baseline and follow-up. Multivariate and univariate analyses of variance were used to determine the effects of mismatch and change in mismatch over time on baseline ratings and changes in ratings of well-being and burnout. All analyses were performed with and without adjustment for age, sex, marital status, children, type of employment, commuting time and extent of telework performed.

Results: The response rate was 39% at baseline (n=928, 67% men, mean(SD) age: 45(11) years) and 60% at follow-up (n=556, 64% men, mean(SD) age: 46(11) years). A cross-sectional association was found between telework mismatch and well-being, showing that employees who teleworked more than they would like reported worse well-being than those who teleworked less than they would like. No statistically significant association was found between telework mismatch and burnout. The ability of telework mismatch at baseline to predict changes in well-being or burnout over 10 months was small and non-significant. No association was found between change in telework mismatch over the 10-month period and corresponding changes in well-being or burnout.

Conclusion: Our results suggest that telework should be thoughtfully practiced in companies/organizations to avoid negative consequences for employees who already telework more than they prefer. Studies are needed to determine how long-term changes in match between preferred and actual extent of telework is associated with employee well-being, including how the association is modified by the nature of the job and the work environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
telecommuting, flexible work, person-environment fit, match, Sweden
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work, Flexibelt arbete
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40591 (URN)10.1186/s12889-023-16683-8 (DOI)001064421700007 ()37674141 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85169998556 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-01257AFA Insurance, 200244
Available from: 2022-12-08 Created: 2022-12-08 Last updated: 2023-10-05Bibliographically approved
Projects
Sjuknärvaro, hälsa och produktivitet. Praktiska, metodologiska och teoretiska utmaningar [170100]; University of GävleFlexible work & Opportunity and Challenge (FLOC) [2019-01257_Forte]; University of Gävle; Publications
Svensson, S., Mathiassen, S. E., Hallman, D., Heiden, M. & Bergström, G. (2023). Associations between telework experience and psychosocial working conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic: A cross-sectional analysis among white-collar workers in Sweden. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 65(2), e74-e82Mutiganda, J. C., Wiitavaara, B., Heiden, M., Svensson, S., Fagerström, A., Bergström, G. & Aboagye, E. (2022). A systematic review of the research on telework and organizational economic performance indicators. Frontiers in Psychology, 13, Article ID 1035310. Svensson, S., Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E., Heiden, M., Fagerström, A., Mutiganda, J. C. & Bergström, G. (2022). Flexible work: Opportunity and Challenge (FLOC) for individual, social and economic sustainability. Protocol for a prospective cohort study of non-standard employment and flexible work arrangements in Sweden. BMJ Open, 12(7), Article ID e057409. Wiitavaara, B., Strömberg, A., Mutiganda, J. C., Svensson, M., Hallman, D. & Svensson, S. (2022). Like a fire brigade, but without pay - Experiences of temporary employment among workers in Swedish elderly care. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-beingHeiden, M., Widar, L., Wiitavaara, B. & Boman, E. (2021). Telework in academia: associations with health and well-being among staff. Higher Education, 81, 707-722Hallman, D., Januario, L., Mathiassen, S. E., Heiden, M., Svensson, S. & Bergström, G. (2021). Working from home during the COVID-19 outbreak in Sweden: effects on 24-h time-use in office workers. BMC Public Health, 21, Article ID 528. Bjärntoft, S., Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E., Larsson, J. & Jahncke, H. (2020). Occupational and individual determinants of work-life balance among office workers with flexible work arrangements. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(4), Article ID 1418.
Effekter av en extern kris på arbetsmiljö, hälsa och jämlikhet bland svensk och utlandsfödd arbetskraft: en fallstudie på ett tvätteri [200243]; University of GävleThe Intervention CAN-Work-S: Facilitating Work Participation among Cancer Survivors During their Entire Professional Career [2021-01546_Forte]; University of Gävle
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0161-160x

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