hig.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 43) Show all publications
Skytt, B., Högberg, H. & Engström, M. (2024). An explorative and confirmative factor analysis of the Leadership and Management Inventory-II among staff working in elderly care. Leadership in Health Services, 37(5), 66-83
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An explorative and confirmative factor analysis of the Leadership and Management Inventory-II among staff working in elderly care
2024 (English)In: Leadership in Health Services, ISSN 1751-1879, E-ISSN 1751-1887, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 66-83Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The Purpose of the study was to investigate the construct validity and internal consistency of the LaMI among staff in the context of elderly care in Sweden.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaire data from a longitudinal study of staff working in elderly care were used. Data were collected using the Leadership and Management Inventory. First data collection was for explorative factor analysis (n = 1,149), and the second collection, one year later, was for confirmatory factor analysis (n = 1,061).

Findings

The explorative factor analysis resulted in a two-factor solution that explained 70.2% of the total variance. Different models were tested in the confirmatory factor analysis. The final model, a two-factor solution where three items were omitted, showed acceptable results.

Originality/value

The instrument measures both leadership and management performance and can be used to continually measure managers’ performances as perceived by staff to identify areas for development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald, 2024
Keywords
Health leadership competencies; Leadership; Management; Nurses; Statistical analysis
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-43286 (URN)10.1108/lhs-01-2023-0004 (DOI)001101160900001 ()37962108 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85176883614 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-16 Created: 2023-11-16 Last updated: 2024-01-24Bibliographically approved
Lindberg, M., Skytt, B., Lindberg, M., Wijk, K. & Strömberg, A. (2023). A complex challenge with unclear improvement: the need for involvement, contextualization and facilitation when managers implement a leadership model. Leadership in Health Services, 36(2), 236-246
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A complex challenge with unclear improvement: the need for involvement, contextualization and facilitation when managers implement a leadership model
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Leadership in Health Services, ISSN 1751-1879, E-ISSN 1751-1887, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 236-246Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

Management and leadership in health care are described as complex and challenging, and the span of control is known to be a key component in the manager’s job demands. The implementation of change can be a challenge in health care, and managers often have roles as implementation leaders. Little attention has been given to how managers perceive the process of implementation. Thus, this study aims to explore second-line managers’ perceptions of, prerequisites for and experiences from the implementation of changes in their manager’s work conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

A grounded theory–based qualitative design was used. Data were collected from a purposive sample of nine second-line managers by individual semi-structured interviews. The three stages of initial coding, focus codes and axial coding were used in data analysis.

Findings

Three thematic areas were identified: engagement, facilitation and achievement. The second-line managers’ descriptions suggest that the change work entails a complex challenge with an unclear result. Involvement, consideration for the context and facilitation are needed to be able to conduct a cohesive implementation process.

Originality/value

This study findings outline that to succeed when implementing change in complex organizations, it is crucial that managers at different levels are involved in the entire process, and that there are prerequisites established for the facilitation and achievement of goals during the planning, implementation and follow-up.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald, 2023
Keywords
Change management; Health services; Implementation; Leadership; Organisation and administration; Qualitative research
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40080 (URN)10.1108/lhs-05-2022-0055 (DOI)000863665800001 ()36193881 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85139172682 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-10-07 Created: 2022-10-07 Last updated: 2023-04-25Bibliographically approved
Arvidsson, L., Skytt, B., Lindberg, M. & Lindberg, M. (2023). Nurses’ assessed self-efficacy levels to medical asepsis and their relation to structural empowerment, work engagement and work-related stress. Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, 74(2), 501-513
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses’ assessed self-efficacy levels to medical asepsis and their relation to structural empowerment, work engagement and work-related stress
2023 (English)In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 74, no 2, p. 501-513Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Nurses’ working conditions are important for their well-being at work and for their ability to provide patients with safe care. Self-efficacy can influence employees’ behaviour at work. Therefore, it is valuable to study self-efficacy levels to medical asepsis in relation to working conditions.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between nurses assessed self-efficacy levels to medical asepsis in care situations and structural empowerment, work engagement and work-related stress.

METHODS: A cross-sectional study with a correlational design was conducted. A total of 417 registered nurses and licensed practical nurses at surgical and orthopaedic units responded to a questionnaire containing: the Infection Prevention Appraisal Scale, the Conditions of Work Effectiveness Questionnaire-II, Utrecht Work Engagement Scale-9 and the Health & Safety Executive Management Standards Indicator Tool. Correlational analyses and group comparisons were performed.

RESULTS: The nurses rated high levels of self-efficacy to medical asepsis in care situations. The correlational analyses revealed that correlation coefficients between structural empowerment, work engagement, work-related stress and self-efficacy to medical asepsis were 0.254–0.268. Significant differences in self-efficacy were found in the grouped working conditions.

CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed that nurses rated high self-efficacy levels to medical asepsis and, to some extent, this seemed related to structural empowerment, work engagement and work-related stress. This valuable knowledge could enable improvements at the managerial and organisational levels, benefiting both nurses and patients in the long run.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press, 2023
Keywords
infection prevention, working conditions, registered nurses, licensed practical nurses
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40325 (URN)10.3233/wor-211305 (DOI)000939517200013 ()36314182 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85148963932 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-10-31 Created: 2022-10-31 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Roos, C., Swall, A., Marmstål Hammar, L., Boström, A.-M. & Skytt, B. (2023). Promoting the person-centred aspects of dignity and well-being: learning from older persons’ experiences of living in residential care facilities. Working with Older People, 27(3), 219-229
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Promoting the person-centred aspects of dignity and well-being: learning from older persons’ experiences of living in residential care facilities
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Working with Older People, ISSN 1366-3666, E-ISSN 2042-8790, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 219-229Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Dignity and well-being are key aspects of the legislation and policies that regulate care of older persons worldwide. In addition, care of older persons should be person-centred. Dignity and well-being are described as results of person-centred care (PCC). The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of important aspects for older persons to experience dignity and well-being in residential care facilities (RCFs).

Design/methodology/approach: This study had a qualitative approach, and individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 older persons living in RCFs. Data were analysed using inductive content analysis.

Findings: To experience dignity and well-being older persons emphasized the importance of preserving their identity. To do this, it was important to be able to manage daily life, to gain support and influence and to belong to a social context. However, the findings indicate a need for improvements. Practical implications: Insights into older persons’ experiences of important aspects for experiencing dignity and well-being in RCFs can be used by first-line managers and registered nurses when designing improvement strategies to promote PCC.

Originality/value: Dignity and well-being are described as results of PCC. The findings provide an understanding of what older persons perceive as important for experiencing dignity and well-being in RCFs. The findings are useful when designing improvement strategies to promote PCC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald, 2023
Keywords
Care; Dignity; Older persons; Person-centred care; Person-centred practice framework; Residential care; Residential care facility; Well-being
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-39995 (URN)10.1108/wwop-08-2022-0034 (DOI)2-s2.0-85137680136 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-09-26 Created: 2022-09-26 Last updated: 2023-08-14Bibliographically approved
Arvidsson, L., Lindberg, M., Skytt, B. & Lindberg, M. (2022). Healthcare personnel's working conditions in relation to risk behaviours for organism transmission: A mixed-methods study. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 31(7-8), 878-894
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healthcare personnel's working conditions in relation to risk behaviours for organism transmission: A mixed-methods study
2022 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 31, no 7-8, p. 878-894Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To investigate healthcare personnel's working conditions in relation to risk behaviours for organism transmission.

BACKGROUND: Healthcare personnel's behaviour is often influenced by working conditions that in turn can impact the development of healthcare-associated infections. Observational studies are scarce, and further understanding of working conditions in relation to behaviour is essential for the benefit of the healthcare personnel and the safety of the patients.

DESIGN: A mixed-methods convergent design.

METHODS: Data were collected during 104 h of observation at eight hospital units. All 79 observed healthcare personnel were interviewed. Structured interviews covering aspects of working conditions were performed with the respective first-line manager. The qualitative and quantitative data were collected concurrently and given equal priority. Data were analysed separately and then merged. The study follows the GRAMMS guidelines for reporting mixed-methods research.

RESULTS: Regardless of measurable and perceived working conditions, risk behaviours frequently occurred especially missed hand disinfection. Healthcare personnel described staffing levels, patient-level workload, physical factors and interruptions as important conditions that influence infection prevention behaviours. The statistical analyses confirmed that interruptions increase the frequency of risk behaviours. Significantly higher frequencies of risk behaviours also occurred in activities where healthcare personnel worked together, which in the interviews was described as a consequence of caring for high-need patients.

CONCLUSIONS: These mixed-methods findings illustrate that healthcare personnel's perceptions do not always correspond to the observed results since risk behaviours frequently occurred regardless of the observed and perceived working conditions. Facilitating the possibility for healthcare personnel to work undisturbed when needed is essential for their benefit and for patient safety.

RELEVANCE FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE: The results can be used to enlighten healthcare personnel and managers and when designing future infection prevention work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2022
Keywords
healthcare personnel behaviour, healthcare-associated infections, infection prevention, interruptions, mixed methods, working conditions
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-36757 (URN)10.1111/jocn.15940 (DOI)000669380800001 ()34219318 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85109108596 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-07-07 Created: 2021-07-07 Last updated: 2022-09-21Bibliographically approved
Lundin, K., Silén, M., Strömberg, A., Engström, M. & Skytt, B. (2022). Staff structural empowerment - observations of first-line managers and interviews with managers and staff. Journal of Nursing Management, 30(2), 403-412
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Staff structural empowerment - observations of first-line managers and interviews with managers and staff
Show others...
2022 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 403-412Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: The aim was to study how first-line managers act to make structural empowerment accessible for nursing staff. Furthermore, to relate these observations to the manager's and their nursing staff's descriptions regarding the staff's access to empowering structures.

BACKGROUND: Staff access to empowering structures has been linked to positive workplace outcomes. Managers play an important role in providing the conditions for structural empowerment.

METHOD: Five first-line managers were observed for two workdays. Managers and staff (n=13) were thereafter interviewed. Field notes and interviews were analyzed using directed content analysis.

RESULTS: The managers displayed intentional actions that could enable their staff access to empowering structures. Managers and staff described the importance of staff's access to empowering structures.

CONCLUSION: Staff who perceive to have access to structural empowerment have managers who are present and available. Unanimity among managers and staff existed in regard to the importance of staff having access to structural empowerment. The managers work continually and intentionally, doing many things at the same time, to provide the staff access to empowering structures.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: The study shows the importance of promoting managers' awareness of staff's access to structural empowerment and maximizing managers' presence and availability to their staff.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2022
Keywords
hospital, nurse managers, nurses, observation, structural conditions, working conditions
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-37389 (URN)10.1111/jonm.13513 (DOI)000732481200001 ()34783103 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85121509064 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-11-18 Created: 2021-11-18 Last updated: 2023-02-17Bibliographically approved
Lundin, K., Silén, M., Strömberg, A., Engström, M. & Skytt, B. (2021). Observations and interviews describing first-line manager’s work at hospitals where the staff rates high access to empowering structures. In: : . Paper presented at Nordic Conference in Nursing Research (NCNR 2021), 4-6 October, 2021, Copenhegen, Denmark.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Observations and interviews describing first-line manager’s work at hospitals where the staff rates high access to empowering structures
Show others...
2021 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background

In times where hospitals are struggling with recruitment as well as keeping their current workers healthy and willing to stay on, it is important to identify factors that can help work organizations in their work of providing conditions for a good work environment and for a leadership that promotes health and development.

Objective

The aim was to study how first-line managers act at units where the staff has rated their access to empowering structures as high and to describe this together with the first-line managers' and their staff's descriptions regarding the staff's access to empowering structures by using Kanter's theory of structural empowerment as a framework. 

Method

A descriptive design with a qualitative approach collecting data using both observations and interviews. The study sample consisted of five first-line managers (FLM) and 13 staff members, at hospital units in different parts of Sweden, where the staff had rated their access to empowering structures as high using the Conditions of Work Effectiveness Questionnaire – II (CWEQ II) in a previous data collection.

Both the first and last author conducted 80 hours of observations, following each FLM during two workdays, and 15 hours of interviewing both the FLMs and staff members. Fieldnotes of what the FLMs were doing were taken during the observations. On the third day at the unit, interviews were conducted with the FLM and two or three out of their staff. The interviews were semi-structured with questions related to the observations and questions inspired by Kanter’s theory. Data from both MP3 files and notebooks were transferred into a Word document and directed content analysis informed by Kanter’s theory was performed on the material as a whole.

Results

Preliminary results from the ongoing analysis indicate that findings in both the observations and interviews often confirm and support each other.

 

Keywords
hospital, nurse managers, nurses, observation, structural conditions, working conditions
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-40020 (URN)
Conference
Nordic Conference in Nursing Research (NCNR 2021), 4-6 October, 2021, Copenhegen, Denmark
Available from: 2022-09-28 Created: 2022-09-28 Last updated: 2023-02-17Bibliographically approved
Engström, M., Högberg, H., Strömberg, A., Hagerman, H. & Skytt, B. (2021). Staff working life and older persons' satisfaction with care: a multilevel, correlational design. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 36(1), 7-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Staff working life and older persons' satisfaction with care: a multilevel, correlational design
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Care Quality, ISSN 1057-3631, E-ISSN 1550-5065, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 7-13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The importance of staff working life for staff well-being has been demonstrated in several studies; less research has focused on staff working life and older persons' satisfaction with care.

PURPOSE: The study aim was to study relationships between 1) staff assessments of their structural conditions/empowerment in elderly care, psychological empowerment, and job satisfaction and (2) older persons' satisfaction with care.

METHODS: A multilevel, cross-sectional, and correlational design was applied using questionnaire data on working life (1021 staff members) and unit-level data (40 elderly care units) on older persons' satisfaction with care.

RESULTS: Statistically significant relationships were found between all 3 working life variables and older persons' satisfaction with care. Furthermore, the results revealed an indirect/mediating effect of job satisfaction between structural empowerment and satisfaction with care, but not for psychological empowerment.

CONCLUSIONS: Staff structural empowerment, psychological empowerment, and job satisfaction are linked to older persons' satisfaction with care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2021
Keywords
elderly care, empowerment, job satisfaction, nurses, quality of care
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-31975 (URN)10.1097/NCQ.0000000000000463 (DOI)000595905000004 ()32079960 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85097213070 (Scopus ID)
Funder
AFA Insurance
Available from: 2020-03-02 Created: 2020-03-02 Last updated: 2023-02-17Bibliographically approved
Lindberg, M., Skytt, B. & Lindberg, M. (2020). Continued wearing of gloves: a risk behaviour in patient care. Infection Prevention in Practice, 2(4), Article ID 100091.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Continued wearing of gloves: a risk behaviour in patient care
2020 (English)In: Infection Prevention in Practice, E-ISSN 2590-0889, Vol. 2, no 4, article id 100091Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

The wearing of gloves is included in the standard principles for preventing healthcare associated infections. A continued wearing of gloves may, however, result in the transmission of organisms instead of preventing infections. Few studies have explored how common it is for surfaces to be touched by potentially contaminated gloves.

Methods

Secondary analysis of field notes from 48 hours of unstructured observations of healthcare personnel's actions during patient care. The new focus was on to what extent healthcare personnel wore gloves that should have been removed or changed, what surfaces were touched by contaminated gloves and what patient-related activities were involved.

Results

A continued wearing of gloves occurred in about half of the observed episodes of patient care. On average, 3.3 surfaces were touched by contaminated gloves. The surfaces most frequently touched were ‘unused single-use items’, ‘equipment controls/switches/regulators/flush buttons’ and ‘bed linen’. This occurred mostly while helping patients with ‘personal hygiene’, when performing ‘test taking’ or during procedures involving the operation of medical or other ‘equipment’.

Conclusion

The continued wearing of gloves during patient-related activities carries the risk of organism transmission, as the gloves touch many surfaces. The most critical moments seem to be when the use of gloves is considered essential. A better understanding of the motivators of improper glove-use behaviour is needed to develop interventions that rectify the improper use of gloves.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Gloves Infection prevention Nurse assistants Organism transmission Registered nurses
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-34026 (URN)10.1016/j.infpip.2020.100091 (DOI)001021833200001 ()34368725 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85109093254 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-09-29 Created: 2020-09-29 Last updated: 2023-10-06Bibliographically approved
Lindberg, M., Carlsson, M., Engström, M., Kristofferzon, M.-L. & Skytt, B. (2020). Nursing student's expectations for their future profession and motivating factors - a longitudinal descriptive study from Sweden. Nurse Education Today, 84, Article ID 104218.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nursing student's expectations for their future profession and motivating factors - a longitudinal descriptive study from Sweden
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 84, article id 104218Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

The shortage of registered nurses is a global concern. Motives to become registered nurses can be to help others, altruism, personal development and career security. Motives in combination with student expectations regarding the role are not explored.

Objective

To describe students' motives to become registered nurses and their expectations regarding their future profession.

Design

A longitudinal descriptive design with a qualitative approach was used to follow nursing students in the beginning, during and at the end of their education.

Participants and setting

A purposive sampling of a group with initially 75 students starting a three-year nursing program at a university in Sweden.

Methods

A study specific questionnaire with open-ended questions was used in the beginning, during and the end of the students' education. At data collection two and three, a copy of the earlier answers was attached. Data were analysed using manifest and latent content analysis.

Results

An important profession with career opportunities, interesting duties and team work were described. Students expected diversified duties, possibilities for development and work satisfaction. Increased concerns regarding their upcoming work life was described at the end of the education.

Conclusion

The students had a positive understanding of the profession and perceived their forthcoming role as interesting. The leading role of coordinating patient care was more comprehensive than expected. Supportive conditions and well planned transition periods could strengthen newly graduated nurses in their professional role and could be an important aspect in the future retention of RNs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Expectations, Longitudinal qualitative study, Nursing students, Professional role
National Category
Health Sciences Nursing
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30703 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2019.104218 (DOI)000501643800026 ()31698292 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-27 Created: 2019-09-27 Last updated: 2021-04-28Bibliographically approved
Projects
Äldreomsorgens vårdare och ledare; samspelet mellan strukturella förutsättningar, chef- ledarskap, arbetssituation och personalens hälsa [110043]; University of Gävle
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1495-4943

Search in DiVA

Show all publications