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Haapakangas, A., Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E. & Jahncke, H. (2019). The effects of moving into an activity-based office on communication, social relations and work demands – A controlled intervention with repeated follow-up. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 66, Article ID 101341.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of moving into an activity-based office on communication, social relations and work demands – A controlled intervention with repeated follow-up
2019 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 66, article id 101341Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

When organizations adopt activity-based workplaces (ABWs), improved interaction is a common goal. Yet, few controlled longitudinal studies have been conducted on the effects of ABWs on interaction, social relations and work demands. The aim of this natural intervention study was to investigate the effects of moving into an ABW on satisfaction with communication, on social relations (i.e., social support and social community) and on work demands (i.e., quantitative demands, emotional demands and work pace) 3 months and 12 months after the relocation. The study included four offices which relocated into an ABW and one control office that did not. Questionnaire data from 408 respondents were analyzed with linear mixed models. Satisfaction with communication and the sense of belonging to a community had decreased 3 and 12 months after the relocation. Work pace was not affected while small, mostly short-term, negative effects on social support, quantitative demands and emotional demands were only observed among employees who had moved to ABWs from private offices. Differences between office sites were also observed. The results suggest that, to avoid negative outcomes, organizations moving to ABWs should focus on solving difficulties in locating colleagues at the office and on supporting particularly workers from private offices in adopting activity-based working.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Flexible office, Collaboration, Stress, Office design, New ways of working, COPSOQ
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29117 (URN)10.1016/j.jenvp.2019.101341 (DOI)000503091000010 ()2-s2.0-85071843921 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-01761Swedish Transport Administration, 2015/43010
Note

Additional finance: Arbetarskyddsfonden nr. 117523

Available from: 2019-01-15 Created: 2019-01-15 Last updated: 2020-01-24Bibliographically approved
Haapakangas, A., Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E. & Jahncke, H. (2018). Self-rated productivity and employee well-being in activity-based offices: the role of environmental perceptions and workspace use. Building and Environment, 145, 115-124
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-rated productivity and employee well-being in activity-based offices: the role of environmental perceptions and workspace use
2018 (English)In: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 145, p. 115-124Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Activity-based offices are increasingly popular. However, productivity and well-being in these work environments have been little researched. The aims of this study were to quantitatively determine perception and use of the activity-based office environment in relation to self-rated productivity and well-being at work, and to identify important predictors of these outcomes. Four activity-based offices in a large Swedish government agency were surveyed 12 months after implementation.Two hundred and thirty-nine respondents were included in the analyses. Linear regression models, adjusted for relevant covariates, were constructed separately for predictors measuring satisfaction with different aspect of the environment (physical environment, privacy, communication, personalization, personal storage, IT functions and cleaning) and office use (the number of daily workspace switches, different workspaces used and the time spent looking for a workspace). Satisfaction with the physical environment, privacy and communication had the strongest positive association with self-rated productivity and well-being at work. Increased workspace switching was associated with higher productivity, while an increase in self-reported time spent searching for a workspace was associated with lower productivity and well-being. However, predictors related to office use generally explained only a small proportion of variance in the two outcomes. The results suggest that office developers should focus particularly on privacy needs but also on communication, personalization, smooth workspace switching and minimization of work time spent looking for available workspaces.

Keywords
flexible office, performance, well-being, work environment, environmental satisfaction
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27315 (URN)10.1016/j.buildenv.2018.09.017 (DOI)000448091500011 ()2-s2.0-85053375834 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761Swedish Transport Administration, 2015/43010
Note

Funding agency:

Finnish Work Environment Fund Grant no: 117423

Available from: 2018-06-23 Created: 2018-06-23 Last updated: 2019-09-26Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2088-2189

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