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Blomqvist, S., Wester, A., Lönnberg, L., Sundelin, G. & Rehn, B. (2017). Physical exercise frequency seem not to influence postural balance but trunk muscle endurance in young persons with intellectual disability. Journal of Physical Education and Sports Management, 4(2), 38-47
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical exercise frequency seem not to influence postural balance but trunk muscle endurance in young persons with intellectual disability
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Physical Education and Sports Management, ISSN 2373-2156, E-ISSN 2373-2164, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 38-47Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background The influence of various physical exercise frequencies on postural balance and muscle performance among young persons with intellectual disability (ID) is not well understood.

Method Cross-sectional data from 26 elite athletes were compared with 37 students at a sports school and to 57 students at a special school, all diagnosed with mild to moderate ID and with different exercise frequencies. Data were also compared with a group of 149 age-matched participants without ID.

Results There were no significant differences in postural balance between young ID groups regardless of physical exercise frequency, all of them had however impaired postural balance compared to the non-ID group. The group with high exercise performed better than the other ID groups in the trunk muscle endurance test.

Conclusions It appears as if physical exercise frequency don’t improve postural balance but endurance in the trunk muscles for young persons with ID.

Keywords
mental retardation, young, teenager, postural control, strength
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25924 (URN)10.15640/jpesm.v4n2a5 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-01-03 Created: 2018-01-03 Last updated: 2018-06-27Bibliographically approved
Larsson, A., Rehn, B. & Blomqvist, S. (2016). Muscle function among healthy adult athletes before and after a postural balance training period. Jacobs Journal of Sports Medicine, 3(2), Article ID 021.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Muscle function among healthy adult athletes before and after a postural balance training period
2016 (Swedish)In: Jacobs Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 2376-9432, Vol. 3, no 2, article id 021Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Postural balance training is primarily used by athletes as rehabilitation after previous injuries or for prevention. A few studies have been made with the aim of investigating whether postural balance training can improve other physical functions in healthy participants. However, there is no consensus regarding effects.

Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether postural balance training can improve muscle function in healthy adult athletes.

Method: Seventeen healthy adult (6 males and 11 females) athletes between the ages of 21 and 50 years performed three postural balance exercises once a day 3x30 seconds per exercise on each leg. This intervention was performed daily for six weeks. Their muscle function were assessed with squat jump, heel rise and grip strength (control). Evaluation was done before and after the training period.

Results: Jump height, number of repetitions in heel rise and duration in standing on one leg increased with statistical significance. There were no improvements in postural sway and grip strength.

Conclusion: The results suggest that a postural balance training period can provide a better local muscle function regarding explosive strength and endurance among adult athletes even if postural sway is not affected.

Keywords
Muscle strength, Equilibrium, Exercise, Physical examination
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23975 (URN)
Available from: 2017-05-04 Created: 2017-05-04 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
Sundahl, L., Zetterbreg, M., Wester, A., Rehn, B. & Blomqvist, S. (2016). Physical activity levels among adolescent and young adults women and men with and without intellectual disability. JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, 29(1), 93-98
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical activity levels among adolescent and young adults women and men with and without intellectual disability
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2016 (English)In: JARID: Journal of applied research in intellectual disabilities, ISSN 1360-2322, E-ISSN 1468-3148, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 93-98Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

As physical activity can prevent overweight and promote general health, the aim was to investigate the amount of physical activity among adolescent and young adult women and men with intellectual disability (ID), compared to age-matched control groups without intellectual disability. A further aim was to examine whether physical activity level was associated with the body mass index (BMI).

Materials and methods

Fifty-two adolescent and young adult women and men with intellectual disability and 48 without intellectual disability, between the ages 16 and 20 years, BMIs ranging from 16.3 to 50.3 kg/m2, were measured for number of steps taken with a pedometer for five consecutive days (Sunday–Thursday).

Results

The only group to meet recommendations regarding number of steps (10 000–12 000/day) was women without intellectual disability. No significant associations were found between total number of steps taken and BMI.

Conclusion

As the majority of adolescents and young adults with intellectual disability, especially women, did not reach recommended activity levels regardless of their BMIs, this call for broad measures to increase physical activity.

Keywords
mental retardation, motor activity, teenagers, youths
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Physiotherapy Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-21004 (URN)10.1111/jar.12170 (DOI)25940840 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84958860194 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-01-12 Created: 2016-01-12 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Blomqvist, S. & Rehn, B. (2015). Fysisk aktivitet och hälsa för personer med utvecklingsstörning. Fysioterapi (1), 26-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fysisk aktivitet och hälsa för personer med utvecklingsstörning
2015 (Swedish)In: Fysioterapi, ISSN 1653-5804, no 1, p. 26-31Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [sv]

Hälsa är en förutsättning för att kunna förverkliga sina mål i livet. Personer med utvecklingsstörning, cirka 90 000 i Sverige, har nedsatt hälsa jämfört med personer utan utvecklingsstörning och det leder till att denna grupp har svårare att uppfylla sina mål. Personer med utvecklingsstörning drabbas i större utsträckning av övervikt, typ 2-diabetes, hjärt- och kärlsjukdomar, högt blodtryck, benskörhet och depression. Undersökningar visar också på nedsatt fysisk aktivitet, motorik, syreupptagningsförmåga, muskelstyrka och postural balans hos denna grupp. Dessa sjukdomar och nedsatta förmågor går att påverkai positiv riktning med fysisk aktivitet. Fysioterapeuter som har bred kunskap om hälsa och anpassning av fysisk aktivitet kan vara till stor hjälp vid prevention, bedömning och träning.

Keywords
utvecklingsstörning, hälsa, fysisk aktivitet
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Sport and Fitness Sciences Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-21006 (URN)
Available from: 2016-01-12 Created: 2016-01-12 Last updated: 2018-12-03Bibliographically approved
Blomqvist, S., Wester, A. & Rehn, B. (2014). Postural muscle responses and adaptations to backward platform perturbations in young people with and without intellectual disability. Gait & Posture, 39(3), 904-908
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Postural muscle responses and adaptations to backward platform perturbations in young people with and without intellectual disability
2014 (English)In: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 904-908Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examines postural muscle responses to backward perturbations in young people (16-20 years) with and without intellectual disability (ID). The study included 56 young people with ID and 43 age-matched without ID volunteers. The subjects stood on a platform that was moved backwards in a surface translation. Lower and upper leg muscles and lower back spine muscles were recorded with surface electromyography (EMG). Muscle onset latency, time to peak amplitude (EMG), adaptation of muscle responses to repeated perturbations (using integrated EMG (IEMG) for epochs), and synergies and strategies were assessed. The result showed no differences between the two groups in muscle onset latency, synergies, and strategies. Young people with ID reduced their time to peak amplitude in investigated muscles, a response that was different from the group without ID. Also, young people with ID tended to adapt their IEMG less compared to the controls. These findings suggest that young people with ID have limited ability to use somatosensory information and adapt their postural muscle responses to repeated external perturbations.

Keywords
Balance perturbations, EMG, Mental retardation, Postural control, Young adults
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-18188 (URN)10.1016/j.gaitpost.2013.11.018 (DOI)000332960600013 ()24373785 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84895891407 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-11-26 Created: 2014-11-26 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Blomqvist, S., Wester, A., Persson, E., Sundkvist, H., Sundelin, G. & Rehn, B. (2014). Postural stability, physical activity, aerobic capacity and their associations for young people with and without intellectual disabilities. European Journal of Adapted Physical Activity, 7(1), 22-30
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Postural stability, physical activity, aerobic capacity and their associations for young people with and without intellectual disabilities
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2014 (English)In: European Journal of Adapted Physical Activity, ISSN 1803-3857, E-ISSN 1803-3857, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 22-30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous studies show that people with intellectual disability (ID) appear to have impaired postural stability, a lower level of physical activity, and lower aerobic capacity compared to persons without ID, limitations that could affect their health. This study investigates these physical functions and their associations in a group of young people with ID compared to an age-matched group without ID. In total, this cross-sectional study included 106 high school students (16-20 years): 57 students with mild to moderate ID and 49 age-matched students without ID (control group). Tests were performed for postural stability, level of physical activity, and aerobic capacity. Both females and males with ID had significantly lower estimated maximum oxygen uptake (l O2/min) (p< 0.001 for females and p=0.004 for males) and a lower aerobic capacity expressed relative to body weight (ml O2/ kg*min) (p< 0.001 for females and p=0.012 for males) compared to age-matched peers. Analyses of associations were made using the Pearson’s correlation coefficient and multivariate linear regression analysis. No significant associations could be found. Physical status appears impaired for young people with ID and functions, such as postural stability, should be evaluated separately.

Keywords
Mental retardation, physical capacity, motor activity, postural equilibrium, youth, teenagers
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-18192 (URN)
Available from: 2014-11-26 Created: 2014-11-26 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
Blomqvist, S., Olsson, J., Wallin, L., Wester, A. & Rehn, B. (2013). Adolescents with intellectual disability have reduced postural balance and muscle performance in trunk and lower limbs compared to peers without intellectual disability. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 34(1), 198-206
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescents with intellectual disability have reduced postural balance and muscle performance in trunk and lower limbs compared to peers without intellectual disability
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2013 (English)In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 198-206Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

For adolescent people with ID, falls are more common compared to peers without ID. However, postural balance among this group is not thoroughly investigated. The aim of this study was to compare balance and muscle performance among adolescents aged between 16 and 20 years with a mild to moderate intellectual disability (ID) to age-matched adolescents without ID. A secondary purpose was to investigate the influence of vision, strength, height and Body Mass Index (BMI) on balance. A group of 100 adolescents with ID and a control group of 155 adolescents without ID were investigated with five balance tests and three strength tests: timed up and go test, one leg stance, dynamic one leg stance, modified functional reach test, force platform test, counter movement jump, sit-ups, and Biering-Sørensen trunk extensor endurance test. The results showed that adolescents with an ID in general had significantly lower scores in the balance and muscle performance tests. The group with ID did not have a more visually dominated postural control compared to the group without ID. Height, BMI or muscle performance had no strong correlations with balance performance. It appears as if measures to improve balance and strength are required already at a young age for people with an ID.

Keywords
Mental retardation, Postural control, Young adults
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-18191 (URN)10.1016/j.ridd.2012.07.008 (DOI)000312520100022 ()22944259 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84865541229 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-11-26 Created: 2014-11-26 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Blomqvist, S. & Rehn, B. (2007). Validity and reliability of the Dynamic One Leg Stance (DOLS) in people with vision loss. Advances in Physiotherapy, 9(3), 129-135
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validity and reliability of the Dynamic One Leg Stance (DOLS) in people with vision loss
2007 (English)In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 129-135Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study tests the concurrent validity and test–retest reliability of a new functional balance test – the Dynamic One Leg Stance (DOLS) in blind subjects and sighted, blindfolded subjects. Twelve blind and 12 sighted men and women between 19 and 61 years volunteered to participate. The correlation between DOLS and the commonly used One Leg Stance balance test (OLS) and the force platform test (FPT) was tested for both the right and left leg. The test–retest reliability of DOLS was analysed using three measurements at least 2 h apart. The correlation between DOLS and FPT and between DOLS and OLS for blind subjects was −0.13 (n.s.) and 0.77 for the left leg and −0.78 and 0.89 for the right leg. For blindfolded subjects, the correlations were −0.56 (n.s.) and 0.93 for the left leg and −0.61 and 0.71 for the right leg. The weighted Kappa values for DOLS were between 0.47 and 0.88 for blind subjects and between 0.47 and 0.72 for blindfolded subjects. Based on these findings, DOLS appears to be a fairly valid and reliable balance test for subjects with vision loss, acquired and experimental. However, further tests of DOLS are necessary.

Keywords
Balance, blind, blindness, force platform, One Leg Stance, postural control
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-18193 (URN)10.1080/14038190701395671 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-11-26 Created: 2014-11-26 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7998-9744

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