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Title [sv]
Forte-centrum Arbetsliv: The Body at Work - from problem to potential
Title [en]
Forte-centre Working Life: The Body at Work - from problem to potential
Abstract [sv]
Musculoskeletal disorders caused by unfavourable physical or mental loads are still a major health problem in many sectors of working life. In spite of considerable research, basic questions as to the origin, prevention and treatment of these disorders are still unsolved. This stands in the way of developing evidence based practices for designing safe work and proper rehabilitation, and it impedes a political vision of working life being inclusive, i.e. giving room even for individuals with decreased capacities. At the same time, other occupations now exhibit a critical lack of physical activity, which also entails profound consequences for public health. Thus, working life offers an arena for prevention of ill-health as well as for promotion of good health. In this context, and with a basis in a strong research environment at the University of Gävle, the FAS centre The Body at Work - from problem to potential operates with a wide research agenda. The eight Centre programs span from studies of biochemical res
Publications (10 of 11) Show all publications
Hallman, D., Holtermann, A., Dencker-Larsen, S., Birk Jorgensen, M. & Nørregaard Rasmussen, C. (2019). Are trajectories of neck-shoulder pain associated with sick leave and work ability in workers? A 1-year prospective study. BMJ Open, 9(e022006)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are trajectories of neck-shoulder pain associated with sick leave and work ability in workers? A 1-year prospective study
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2019 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no e022006Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ObjectivesThe study aimed to determine the extent to which latent trajectories of neck–shoulder pain (NSP) are associated with self-reported sick leave and work ability based on frequent repeated measures over 1 year in an occupational population.

MethodsThis longitudinal study included 748 Danish workers (blue-collar, n=620; white collar, n=128). A questionnaire was administered to collect data on personal and occupational factors at baseline. Text messages were used for repeated measurements of NSP intensity (scale 0–10) over 1 year (14 waves in total). Simultaneously, selfreported sick leave (days/month) due to pain was assessed at 4-week intervals, while work ability (scale 0–10) was assessed using a single item (work ability index) at 12-week intervals over the year. Trajectories of NSP, distinguished by latent class growth analysis, were usedas predictors of sick leave and work ability in generalised estimation equations with multiple adjustments.

ResultsSick leave increased and work ability decreased across all NSP trajectory classes (low, moderate, strong fluctuating and severe persistent pain intensity). In the adjusted model, the estimated number of days on sickleave was 1.5 days/month for severe persistent NSP compared with 0.1 days/month for low NSP (relativ risk=13.8, 95% CI 6.7 to 28.5). Similarly, work ability decreased markedly for severe persistent NSP (OR=12.9,95% CI 8.5 to 19.7; median 7.1) compared with low NSP (median 9.5).

ConclusionSevere persistent NSP was associatedwith sick leave and poor work ability over 1 year amongworkers. Preventive strategies aiming at reducing severepersistent NSP among working populations are needed.

Keywords
LCGA; chronic pain; neck pain; occupational; pain trajectories
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25568 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2018-022006 (DOI)000471144900020 ()30898794 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85063278240 (Scopus ID)
Projects
PAINclass
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Note

Funding agency:

- Danish Government (Satspulje) 

Available from: 2017-11-22 Created: 2017-11-22 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Hallman, D., Mathiassen, S. E., van der Beek, A., Jackson, J. & Coenen, P. (2019). Calibration of self-reported time spent sitting, standing and walking among office workers: a compositional data analysis. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(17), Article ID 3111.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Calibration of self-reported time spent sitting, standing and walking among office workers: a compositional data analysis
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 17, article id 3111Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We developed and evaluated calibration models predicting objectively measured sitting, standing and walking time from self-reported data using a compositional data analysis (CoDA) approach. A total of 98 office workers (48 women) at the Swedish Transport Administration participated. At baseline and three-months follow-up, time spent sitting, standing and walking at work was assessed for five working days using a thigh-worn accelerometer (Actigraph), as well as by self-report (IPAQ). Individual compositions of time spent in the three behaviors were expressed by isometric log-ratios (ILR). Calibration models predicting objectively measured ILRs from self-reported ILRs were constructed using baseline data, and then validated using follow-up data. Un-calibrated self-reports were inaccurate; root-mean-square (RMS) errors of ILRs for sitting, standing and walking were 1.21, 1.24 and 1.03, respectively. Calibration reduced these errors to 36% (sitting), 40% (standing), and 24% (walking) of those prior to calibration. Calibration models remained effective for follow-up data, reducing RMS errors to 33% (sitting), 51% (standing), and 31% (walking). Thus, compositional calibration models were effective in reducing errors in self-reported physical behaviors during office work. Calibration of self-reports may present a cost-e_ective method for obtaining physical behavior data with satisfying accuracy in large-scale cohort and intervention studies.

Keywords
physical activity; sedentary behavior; oce work; accuracy; calibration; compositional data analysis
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30597 (URN)10.3390/ijerph16173111 (DOI)000487037500106 ()31461868 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85071631368 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-01761
Available from: 2019-08-28 Created: 2019-08-28 Last updated: 2019-10-14Bibliographically approved
Jackson, J., Srinivasan, D. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2019). Consistent individual motor variability traits demonstrated by females performing a long-cycle assembly task under conditions differing in temporal organisation. Applied Ergonomics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consistent individual motor variability traits demonstrated by females performing a long-cycle assembly task under conditions differing in temporal organisation
2019 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

Low motor variability (MV) during repetitive work has shown association with higher risk for developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). Whether consistent individual MV characteristics exist across working conditions remains unknown. This study aimed to determine if individual MV traits were consistent during complex assembly work performed under conditions differing in temporal organisation.

Fifteen women performed cyclic-assembly under four conditions differing in pace and organisation (line-type, batch-type). Variability of trapezius muscle activity and upper arm elevation was quantified. Total MV variance was partitioned into components attributable to subjects, days and conditions.

For all metrics, a non-zero between-subjects variance was found, indicating consistent individual MV traits across conditions. Variance between subjects was higher for EMG MV metrics compared with kinematic metrics.

Our results showed individuals exhibited consistent MV traits across working conditions differing in pace and production process, and support continued research into MV as a possible individual risk factor for MSDs.

Keywords
motor control, trapezius electromyography, upper arm elevation angle
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30605 (URN)
Available from: 2019-08-28 Created: 2019-08-28 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Domkin, D., Forsman, M. & Richter, H. O. (2019). Effect of ciliary-muscle contraction force on trapezius muscle activity during computer mouse work. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 119(2), 389-397
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of ciliary-muscle contraction force on trapezius muscle activity during computer mouse work
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 119, no 2, p. 389-397Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study aimed to identify whether or not an increase in ciliary-muscle contraction force, when the eye-lens is adjusted for viewing at a near distance, result in an increase in trapezius muscle activity, while performing a natural work task. Twelve participants, ranging in age from 21 to 32 years, performed a computer-mouse work task during free gaze conditions. A moving visual target was tracked with a computer mouse on a screen placed at two different distances from the eyes, 25 cm and 50 cm. Tracking performance, eye accommodation, and bilateral trapezius muscle activity were measured continuously. Ciliary-muscle contraction force was computed according to a formula which takes into account the age-dependent, non-linear relationship between contraction force of the ciliary muscle and the produced level of eye accommodation. Generalized Estimating Equations analyses were performed. On the dominant hand side and for the nearest screen distance, there was a significant effect of ciliary-muscle contraction force on the trapezius muscle activity (p<0.001). No other effects were significant (p>0.05). The results support the hypothesis that high visual demands, during computer mouse work, increase ciliary muscle contraction force and contribute to a raise of the sustained level of trapezius muscle activity. The current study specifically clarifies the validity of the relationship between ciliary-muscle contraction force and trapezius muscle activity and demonstrates that this relationship is not due to a general personal trait. We conclude that a high level of ciliary muscle contraction force can contribute to a development of musculoskeletal complaints in the neck-shoulder area.

Keywords
Ciliary-muscle contraction force; Computer mouse work; Electromyography; Eye-accommodation; Trapezius muscle; Visual ergonomics
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26194 (URN)10.1007/s00421-018-4031-8 (DOI)000457735500006 ()30430279 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056460114 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Available from: 2018-03-01 Created: 2018-03-01 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved
Bohman, T., Bottai, M. & Björklund, M. (2019). Predictive models for short-term and long-term improvement in women under physiotherapy for chronic disabling neck pain: a longitudinal cohort study. BMJ Open, 9(4), Article ID e024557.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictive models for short-term and long-term improvement in women under physiotherapy for chronic disabling neck pain: a longitudinal cohort study
2019 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 4, article id e024557Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives To develop predictive models for short-term and long-term clinically important improvement in women with non-specific chronic disabling neck pain during the clinical course of physiotherapy. Design Longitudinal cohort study based on data from a randomised controlled trial evaluating short-term and long-term effects on sensorimotor function over 11 weeks of physiotherapy. Participants and settings Eighty-nine women aged 31-65 years with non-specific chronic disabling neck pain from Gavle, Sweden. Measures The outcome, clinically important improvement, was measured with the Patient Global Impression of Change Scale (PGICS) and the Neck Disability Index (NDI), assessed by self-administered questionnaires at 3, 9 and 15 months from the start of the interventions (baseline). Twelve baseline prognostic factors were considered in the analyses. The predictive models were built using random-effects logistic regression. The predictive ability of the models was measured by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Internal validity was assessed with cross-validation using the bootstrap resampling technique. Results Factors included in the final PGICS model were neck disability and age, and in the NDI model, neck disability, depression and catastrophising. In both models, the odds for short-term and long-term improvement increased with higher baseline neck disability, while the odds decreased with increasing age (PGICS model), and with increasing level of depression (NDI model). In the NDI model, higher baseline levels of catastrophising indicated increased odds for short-term improvement and decreased odds for long-term improvement. Both models showed acceptable predictive validity with an AUC of 0.64 (95% CI 0.55 to 0.73) and 0.67 (95% CI 0.59 to 0.75), respectively. Conclusion Age, neck disability and psychological factors seem to be important predictors of improvement, and may inform clinical decisions about physiotherapy in women with chronic neck pain. Before using the developed predictive models in clinical practice, however, they should be validated in other populations and tested in clinical settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30510 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2018-024557 (DOI)000471157200062 ()31023751 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065220930 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2006-1162Länsförsäkringar AB, 51-1010/06Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Note

Funding: Alfta Research Foundation

Available from: 2019-08-16 Created: 2019-08-16 Last updated: 2019-08-22Bibliographically approved
Holtermann, A., Mathiassen, S. E. & Straker, L. (2019). Promoting health and physical capacity during productive work: the Goldilocks Principle. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 45(1), 90-97
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Promoting health and physical capacity during productive work: the Goldilocks Principle
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 90-97Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

In spite of preventive efforts, organizations and employees face several challenges related to working life and occupational health, such as a substantial prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders, social inequality in health and physical capacity, multi-morbidity, an obesity epidemic and an aging workforce. We argue that a new approach for occupational ergonomics and health is required, going beyond prevention of harm caused by work. We propose the ´Goldilocks Principle´ as a new approach of how productive work can be designed to literally promote health and physical capacity.

Methods                 

Physical (in)activity profoundly influences health and physical capacity, with effects depending on the extent and temporal structure of the (in)activity. Like the porridge, chair and bed that needed to be ‘just right’ for Goldilocks in the fairy-tale of ´The Three Bears´, physical activity during productive work needs to be ‘just right’ for promoting rather than deteriorating health and capacity. In many jobs, physical activity is, however, either ’too much/high/frequent’ or ’too little/low/infrequent’ to give positive biomechanical and cardiometabolic stimuli.

Results

The paper presents the rationale, concept, development, application and prospects of the Goldilocks Principle for how productive work can be designed to promote health and physical capacity.

Conclusions

We envision a great potential to promote health and physical capacity by designing productive work according to the Goldilocks Principle, thus leading to benefits with respect to the current challenges related to working life and occupational health for society, organizations and employees.

Keywords
Physical activity; Physical work demands; Sedentary behaviour; Workplace health promotion; Ergonomics; Occupational health
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26505 (URN)10.5271/sjweh.3754 (DOI)000466176700010 ()30021029 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055081942 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-01761
Available from: 2018-04-25 Created: 2018-04-25 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Hallman, D., Holtermann, A., Björklund, M., Gupta, N. & Nørregaard Rasmussen, C. D. (2019). Sick leave due to musculoskeletal pain : determinants of distinct trajectories over 1 year. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sick leave due to musculoskeletal pain : determinants of distinct trajectories over 1 year
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2019 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose

This study aimed to identify sub-groups of workers with different trajectories of sick leave due to musculoskeletalpain over 1 year, and to investigate the extent to which the identified trajectories are associated with personal, occupational,lifestyle, and pain-related factors at baseline.

Methods

Data on 981 blue- and white-collar workers were analyzed in the DPHACTO cohort (2012–2014). The numberof days on sick leave due to pain was reported using text messages at 4-week intervals across 1 year. Latent class growthanalysis was used to distinguish sub-groups with different trajectories of sick leave. A web-based questionnaire at baselinewas used to assess personal, occupational (physical and psychosocial), lifestyle, and pain-related factors. Multinomial regressionmodels were constructed to determine associations between baseline factors and trajectories of sick leave (referencingno sick leave), with adjustment for potential confounders.

Results

Four distinct sub-groups were identified, with trajectories of sick leave due to pain ranging from no sick leave(prevalence 76%; average 0.5 days/year) to some days and increasing sick leave due to pain over 1 year (2%; 89 days/year).The increasing trajectory of sick leave was associated with higher perceived physical exertion, more time in manual work,less social community and influence at work, less leisure-time physical activity, smoking, and more severe symptoms (e.g.,multisite pain, low back pain intensity, and pain interference).

Conclusions

We identified four distinct trajectories of sick leave due to musculoskeletal pain. The sub-group with increasingsick leave due to pain was associated with several modifiable physical and psychosocial factors at work and outside work,which may have implications for prevention.

Keywords
Longitudinal, Risk factors, Sickness absence, Workers
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-29674 (URN)10.1007/s00420-019-01447-y (DOI)31165308 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85067077539 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-01761
Note

Danish Working Environment Research Fund Grant no. 01-2015-09

Available from: 2019-06-05 Created: 2019-06-05 Last updated: 2019-08-20Bibliographically approved
Gupta, N., Heiden, M., Mathiassen, S. E. & Holtermann, A. (2018). Is self-reported time spent sedentary and in physical activity differentially biased by age, gender, body mass index and low-back pain?. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 44(2), 163-170
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is self-reported time spent sedentary and in physical activity differentially biased by age, gender, body mass index and low-back pain?
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 163-170Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives We aimed at determining the extent to which age, gender, BMI and low back pain (LBP) influence bias in self-reported sedentary behavior and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) among blue-collar workers. 

Methods 147 workers wore an Actigraph accelerometer on the thigh for 2-4 consecutive working days. Proportional time spent sedentary and in MVPA was determined using the Acti4 software. The same variables were also self-reported in a questionnaire. The difference between self-reported and accelerometer-based sedentary time and MVPA was calculated and linearly regressed against age, gender, BMI, and self-reported LBP intensity as main effects, as well as interaction terms combining each of these factors with objectively measured exposure.   

Results Workers objectively spent 64% of their time sedentary and 9% in MVPA. On average, self-reports underestimated sedentary time by 1.5 time percentage points and overestimated MVPA by 5.5%. Workers with mild/no LBP appeared to have the same size of self-report bias in MVPA regardless of how much MVPA they actually had, while workers with high LBP overestimated MVPA to an increasing extent with increasing exposure (interaction: B 0.29, 95%CI 0.05 to 0.53). Age was positively associated with self-report bias in sedentary time (B=0.31, 95%CI=0.09 - 0.54, P=0.008) regardless of actual sedentary time.

Conclusions LBP and age, but not BMI and gender, introduced differential bias in self-reported information on sedentary behavior and MVPA among blue-collar workers. This result suggests that bias correction in future studies based on self-reports of sedentary time and MVPA should account for LBP and age.

Keywords
Measurement error, exposure modelling, questionnaire, musculoskeletal pain
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-24600 (URN)10.5271/sjweh.3693 (DOI)000427107100006 ()29184965 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042866971 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-01761
Note

Funding agency: Danish Work Environment Research Fund  Grant no: 20130069161/9

Available from: 2017-06-28 Created: 2017-06-28 Last updated: 2019-08-26Bibliographically approved
Richter, H., Forsman, M., Elcadi, G. H., Brautaset, R., Marsh, J. E. & Zetterberg, C. (2018). Prefrontal cortex activity evoked by convergence load under conflicting stimulus-to-accommodation and stimulus-to-vergence eye-movements measured by NIRS: Prefrontal cortex oxygenation and visual fatigue. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 12, Article ID 298.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prefrontal cortex activity evoked by convergence load under conflicting stimulus-to-accommodation and stimulus-to-vergence eye-movements measured by NIRS: Prefrontal cortex oxygenation and visual fatigue
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5161, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 12, article id 298Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To extend our knowledge of the functional linkages between visual fatigueand regional cerebral prefrontal cortex (PFC) oxygenation, we measured time related hemodynamic changes over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) duringconvergence load under conflicting stimulus-to-accommodation and stimulus-tovergence eye movements with and without concurrent mental load.

Methods: Twenty healthy participants with a median age of 28 years (range:18–44 years) fixated upon a vertical bar presented separately to the left andright eyes, using polarized filters, during four counterbalanced 10-min periods:(i) no accommodation/vergence conflict (Control, Ctrl); (ii) added convergenceload and accommodation/vergence conflict (Conv); (iii) added cognitive load only(Cog) and; (iv) a combination of added cognitive and convergence load andaccommodation/vergence conflict (Cc). Viewing distance was 65 cm. Non-invasivemeasurements of hemodynamic activity over the dlPFC were quantified by functionalnear-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). During the two-convergence load conditions, thehorizontal disparity of the two bars varied dynamically from no disparity to a disparityset 20% below the individual threshold for diplopia. Cognitive load was induced by then-back-2 test which required the subject to memorize and recall the changing colorsof the horizontal bars and decide when a given color was the same as that occurring two colors previously. fNIRS data were averaged over 10-s windows centered at 0, 2,4, 6, 8, and 10 min of each task, subtracted from a 20-s baseline window immediatelypreceding the visual task, and then represented as changes in oxygenated hemoglobin(ΔHbO2); deoxygenated hemoglobin (ΔHHb) and total hemoglobin (ΔtHb).

Results: Linear mixed model analyses showed that hemodynamic activity wassystematically influenced by time (p < 0.001). The group-averaged time-related levelof change across the viewing conditions did not differ when compared with one another(p > 0.05). Larger convergence eye-movement responses under conflicting stimulus-to accommodation,and stimulus-to-vergence over time, increased ΔHbO2 and ΔtHb onlyin condition Cc and after 8 min of task time (p < 0.10 for min-6 and min-8: p < 0.05 for min-10).

Discussion: Collectively, our data suggest that HbO2, HHb, and tHb, recorded over the dlPFC with fNIRS, can be used to assay the degree to which supervisory oculomotorcontrol processes are activated during visually deficient near work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
Visual fatigue, Accommodation, Compensatory effort, Convergence, Disparity, Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS), Time series analysis, Visual ergonomics
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25766 (URN)10.3389/fnhum.2018.00298 (DOI)000440216100002 ()30104967 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054772976 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761Swedish Research Council, 2015-01116
Note

Corrigendum: Prefrontal Cortex Oxygenation Evoked by Convergence Load Under Conflicting Stimulus-to-Accommodation and Stimulus-to-Vergence Eye-Movements Measured by NIRS DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2018.00384

ScopusId: 2-s2.0-85054817559ISI-id: 000445088000001 PubMedID: 30271336

Available from: 2017-12-08 Created: 2017-12-08 Last updated: 2019-08-28Bibliographically approved
Trask, C., Mathiassen, S. E., Rostami, M. & Heiden, M. (2017). Observer variability in posture assessment from video recordings: the effect of partly visible periods. Applied Ergonomics, 60, 275-281
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Observer variability in posture assessment from video recordings: the effect of partly visible periods
2017 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 60, p. 275-281Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Observers rank partly visible postures on video frames differently than fully visible postures, but it’s not clear if this is due to differences in observer perception. This study investigated the effect of posture visibility on between-observer variability in assessments of trunk and arm posture.  Trained observers assessed trunk and arm postures from video recordings of 84 pulp mill shifts using a work sampling approach; postures were also categorized as ‘fully’ or ‘partly’ visible.  Between-worker, between-day, and between-observer variance components and corresponding confidence intervals were calculated. Although no consistent gradient was seen for the right upper arm, trunk posture showed smaller between-observer variance when all observers rated a posture as fully visible. This suggests that, partly- visible data, especially when observers disagree as to the level of visibility, introduces more between-observer variability when compared to fully visible data.  Some previously-identified differences in daily posture summaries may be related to this phenomenon.

Keywords
Observation, inter-rater agreement, posture, exposure assessment, pulp mill
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-21286 (URN)10.1016/j.apergo.2016.12.009 (DOI)000394485400028 ()28166886 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85007047071 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2010-00748
Note

Funding agency:

Canada Research Chairs program

Available from: 2016-02-29 Created: 2016-02-29 Last updated: 2019-10-04Bibliographically approved
Principal InvestigatorMathiassen, Svend Erik
Coordinating organisation
University of Gävle
Funder
Period
2009-10-01 - 2018-12-31
Identifiers
DiVA, id: project:315Project, id: 2009-01761_Forte

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