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Dignity in life and care: The perspectives of Swedish patients in a palliative care context
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science. Department of Oncology Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö; Center for Collaborative Palliative Care, Växjö, Sweden; Center for Collaborative Palliative Care, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö; Center for Collaborative Palliative Care, Växjö, Sweden; Center for Collaborative Palliative Care, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar; Center for Collaborative Palliative Care, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden .
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 193-201Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: How patients preserve their sense of dignity in life is an important area of palliative care that remains to be explored. Aims: To describe patients' perspectives of what constitutes a dignified life within a palliative care context. Methods: Twelve palliative care patients were interviewed about their views on living with dignity. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results: What constitutes a dignified life during end-of-life care was captured by the theme 'I may be ill but I am still a human being' and presented under the categories 'preserving my everyday life and personhood', 'having my human value maintained by others through 'coherence' and 'being supported by society at large'. Conclusion: Patients' sense of dignity can be preserved by their own attitudes and behaviours, by others and through public support. Health professionals need to adopt a dignity-conserving approach, for which awareness of their own attitudes and behaviours is crucial. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MA Healthcare Ltd , 2019. Vol. 25, no 4, p. 193-201
Keywords [en]
Care of the dying, Dignity, Health professionals, Palliative care, adult, article, awareness, clinical article, content analysis, female, human, human dignity, male, palliative therapy, personhood, Swedish citizen, terminal care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30508DOI: 10.12968/ijpn.2019.25.4.193Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85064863576OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-30508DiVA, id: diva2:1343353
Available from: 2019-08-16 Created: 2019-08-16 Last updated: 2019-08-20Bibliographically approved

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Bylund-Grenklo, Tove

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