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Wing morphology of the butterfly Coenonympha arcania in Europe: traces of both historical isolation in glacial refugia and current adaption
Institute of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7044, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden.
Senckenberg German Entomological Institute, Eberswalder Straße 90, 15374 Müncheberg, Germany.
Department of Biology, Lund University, SE-223 62 Lund, Sweden.ORCID-id: 0000-0002-1259-3363
Institute of Forest Ecology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Ľ. Štúra 2, 960 53 Zvolen, Slovakia.
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2020 (engelsk)Inngår i: Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research, ISSN 0947-5745, E-ISSN 1439-0469Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

In this study, we examined the evolutionary outcome of and interplay between historic isolation and current selection pressures on traits more or less closely connected to fitness in the Pearly Heath butterfly (Coenonympha arcania) across its range in Europe. We hypothesized that a trait mean is more related to historic events if it has low connection to fitness, while a trait more closely connected with fitness is expected to have a mean that relates more to current selection pressures. In order to test this, we collected 322 butterflies from across the species range in Europe and measured five wing traits relating to size and color patterns. To infer a phylogeographic history for each individual, we sequenced a 594 bp fragment of the COI gene. The morphological data were then analyzed in relation to selected climatic variables and the history of individuals to disentangle which factors best correlated with morphological variation. The results supported our hypothesis in that wing sizes correlated with summer precipitation but not with its inferred location during the last glaciation. Eyespot position, on the other hand, correlated with the history of individuals but not with the analyzed climatic indicators. The sizes of the black spot and the white band, two traits that were expected to have intermediate selection pressure, were associated with both history and current conditions. Thus, this study illustrates the fascinating interplay between events and processes that lead to a specific evolutionary outcome.

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2020.
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URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-31329DOI: 10.1111/jzs.12360ISI: 000506053500001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85078596470OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-31329DiVA, id: diva2:1380402
Tilgjengelig fra: 2019-12-18 Laget: 2019-12-18 Sist oppdatert: 2020-02-17bibliografisk kontrollert

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