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Stress-related responses to alternations between repetitive physical work and cognitive tasks of different difficulties
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4283-4199
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1443-6211
Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8213-1391
University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Science, Biology.
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2019 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

This experimental study aimed to determine the extent to which a repetitive physical task alternatingwith a cognitive task (CT) influences stress responses and whether the CT difficulty is important. Fifteen women performed three sessions of 10 consecutive work bouts, each including a seven-minutere petitive physical task and a three-minute CT at either of three difficulty levels. Stress-related responses were assessed using heart rate variability, blood pressure, salivary alpha-amylase, salivary cortisol, perceived stress and cognitive performance.The alternating work did not result in any marked increase in perceived stress or changes in stressresponses. CT difficulty did not influence stress responses (all p>0.05), apart from alpha-amylase which was higher during the easiest CT (F= 5.34, p= 0.02). Thus, introducing cognitive work bouts into repetitive physical work did not result in increased levels of stress, suggesting this approach to be viable in job rotation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
Keywords [en]
recovery, stress, mental task
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-30459OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-30459DiVA, id: diva2:1340668
Funder
AFA Insurance, 120223Available from: 2019-08-06 Created: 2019-08-06 Last updated: 2019-08-26Bibliographically approved

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Mixter, SusannaMathiassen, Svend ErikDimberg, KenthJahncke, HelenaLyskov, EugeneHallman, David

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Applied Ergonomics
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