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Healthcare personnel's working conditions in relation to risk behaviours for organism transmission: A mixed-methods study
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1712-6350
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1289-9896
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science. Uppsala universitet.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1495-4943
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science. Uppsala universitet.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6738-6102
2022 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 31, no 7-8, p. 878-894Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To investigate healthcare personnel's working conditions in relation to risk behaviours for organism transmission.

BACKGROUND: Healthcare personnel's behaviour is often influenced by working conditions that in turn can impact the development of healthcare-associated infections. Observational studies are scarce, and further understanding of working conditions in relation to behaviour is essential for the benefit of the healthcare personnel and the safety of the patients.

DESIGN: A mixed-methods convergent design.

METHODS: Data were collected during 104 h of observation at eight hospital units. All 79 observed healthcare personnel were interviewed. Structured interviews covering aspects of working conditions were performed with the respective first-line manager. The qualitative and quantitative data were collected concurrently and given equal priority. Data were analysed separately and then merged. The study follows the GRAMMS guidelines for reporting mixed-methods research.

RESULTS: Regardless of measurable and perceived working conditions, risk behaviours frequently occurred especially missed hand disinfection. Healthcare personnel described staffing levels, patient-level workload, physical factors and interruptions as important conditions that influence infection prevention behaviours. The statistical analyses confirmed that interruptions increase the frequency of risk behaviours. Significantly higher frequencies of risk behaviours also occurred in activities where healthcare personnel worked together, which in the interviews was described as a consequence of caring for high-need patients.

CONCLUSIONS: These mixed-methods findings illustrate that healthcare personnel's perceptions do not always correspond to the observed results since risk behaviours frequently occurred regardless of the observed and perceived working conditions. Facilitating the possibility for healthcare personnel to work undisturbed when needed is essential for their benefit and for patient safety.

RELEVANCE FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE: The results can be used to enlighten healthcare personnel and managers and when designing future infection prevention work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley , 2022. Vol. 31, no 7-8, p. 878-894
Keywords [en]
healthcare personnel behaviour, healthcare-associated infections, infection prevention, interruptions, mixed methods, working conditions
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-36757DOI: 10.1111/jocn.15940ISI: 000669380800001PubMedID: 34219318Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85109108596OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-36757DiVA, id: diva2:1578727
Available from: 2021-07-07 Created: 2021-07-07 Last updated: 2022-09-21Bibliographically approved

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Arvidsson, LisaLindberg, MagnusSkytt, BerniceLindberg, Maria

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