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Pathways to Recovery (PTR): Impact of peer-led group participation on mental health recovery outcomes
2010 (English)In: Psychiatric rehabilitation journal, ISSN 1095-158X, E-ISSN 1559-3126, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 42-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: This study examined the positive effects on recovery outcomes for people with severe and persistent mental illness using peer-led groups based on Pathways to Recovery: A Strengths Recovery Self-Help Workbook (PTR). PTR translates the evidence-supported practice of the Strengths Model into a self-help approach, allowing users to identify and pursue life goals based on personal and environmental strengths. Methods: A single-group pretest-posttest research design was applied. Forty-seven members in 6 consumer-run organizations in one Midwestern state participated in a PTR peer-led group, completing a baseline survey before the group and again at the completion of the 12-week sessions. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the General Self-Efficacy Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, the Spirituality Index of Well-Being, and the Modified Colorado Symptom Index were employed as recovery outcomes. Paired Hotelling's T-square test was conducted to examine the mean differences of recovery outcomes between the baseline and the completion of the group. Results: Findings revealed statistically significant improvements for PTR participants in self-esteem, self-efficacy, social support, spiritual well-being, and psychiatric symptoms. Conclusions: This initial research is promising for establishing PTR as an important tool for facilitating recovery using a peer-led group format. The provision of peer-led service has been emphasized as critical to integrating consumers' perspectives in recovery-based mental health services. Given the current federal funding stream for peer services, continued research into PTR and other peer-led services becomes more important. Copyright 2010 Trustees of Boston University.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 34, no 1, p. 42-48
Keywords [en]
Consumer-centered services, Group intervention, Recovery, Self-help, adult, aged, article, book, case management, evidence based medicine, female, human, male, middle aged, peer group, personality test, psychological aspect, psychometry, psychosis, self care, self concept, self help, statistics, treatment outcome, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Manuals as Topic, Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care), Personality Inventory, Psychometrics, Psychotic Disorders, Self-Help Groups, Young Adult
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Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-38552DOI: 10.2975/34.1.2010.42.48Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-77954984013OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-38552DiVA, id: diva2:1659657
Available from: 2022-05-20 Created: 2022-05-20 Last updated: 2022-05-20Bibliographically approved

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Holter, Mark

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