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Variation at work: alternations between physically and mentally demanding tasks in blue-collar occupations
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6668-5044
University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental psychology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4298-7459
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1443-6211
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2741-1868
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2017 (English)In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The aims of this questionnaire study were to describe the occurrence and desired number of alternations between mental and physical tasks in industrial and non-industrial blue-collar work, and determine to which extent selected personal and occupational factors influence these conditions. On average, the 122 participating workers (55 females) reported to have close to four alternations per day between mental and physical tasks, and to desire more alternations than they actually had. They also expressed a general preference for performing a physical task after a mental task and vice versa. In univariate regression models, the desired change in task alternations was significantly associated with Gender, Age, Occupation, Years with current work tasks, and Perceived job control, while Occupation was the only significant determinant in a multiple regression model including all factors. Our results suggest that alternations between productive physical and mental tasks could be a viable option in future job rotation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
Keyword [en]
cognitive task, job rotation, pause, physical variation, repetitive work
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-22560DOI: 10.1080/00140139.2017.1282630PubMedID: 28112588Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85011278003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-22560DiVA: diva2:1033524
Funder
AFA Insurance, 120223
Available from: 2016-10-07 Created: 2016-10-07 Last updated: 2017-03-01Bibliographically approved

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Jahncke, HelenaHygge, StaffanMathiassen, Svend ErikHallman, DavidMixter, SusannaLyskov, Eugene
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