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Does induced masseter muscle pain affect integrated jaw-neck movements similarly in men and women?
Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Research and Development, Umeå University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4556-2846
Department of Research and Development, Umeå University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
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2016 (English)In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 124, no 6, 546-553 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Normal jaw opening-closing involves simultaneous jaw and head-neck movements. We previously showed that, in men, integrated jaw-neck movements during jaw function are altered by induced masseter muscle pain. The aim of this study was to investigate possible sex-related differences in integrated jaw-neck movements following experimental masseter muscle pain. We evaluated head-neck and jaw movements in 22 healthy women and 16 healthy men in a jaw opening-closing task. The participants performed one control trial and one trial with masseter muscle pain induced by injection of hypertonic saline. Jaw and head movements were registered using a three-dimensional optoelectronic recording system. There were no significant sex-related differences in jaw and head movement amplitudes. Head movement amplitudes were significantly greater in the pain trials for both men and women. The proportional involvement of the neck motor system during jaw movements increased in pain trials for 13 of 16 men and for 18 of 22 women. Thus, acute pain may alter integrated jaw-neck movements, although, given the similarities between men and women, this interaction between acute pain and motor behaviour does not explain sex differences in musculoskeletal pain in the jaw and neck regions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 124, no 6, 546-553 p.
Keyword [en]
head movements; jaw; masseter muscle; neck; pain
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-22724DOI: 10.1111/eos.12315ISI: 000387755000005PubMedID: 27781338ScopusID: 2-s2.0-84995482173OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-22724DiVA: diva2:1045735
Note

Funding agencies: Department of Research and Development, Vasternorrland County Council; Swedish Dental Society; Sigurd and Elsa Golje Memorial Foundation 

Available from: 2016-11-10 Created: 2016-11-10 Last updated: 2017-01-09Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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More styles
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