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Occupant perception of “green” buildings: Distinguishing physical and psychological factors
University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental psychology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8442-8324
University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental psychology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7584-2275
University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Energy system. (Energy Systems)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2171-3013
2017 (English)In: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 114, 140-147 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Studies have found a preference bias for “environmentally friendly” or “green” artifacts and buildings. For example, indoor environments are more favorably viewed when the building is labeled/certified “green”, in comparison with one that is not labeled/certified, even though the two environments are actually identical. The present study explored how physical properties of the indoor environment (high vs. low temperature) and labeling (“green” vs. “conventional”) interacts in their effect on environment perception. Participants performed a series of tasks in four indoor environments with different labels (low vs. high carbon footprint) and different temperatures (23°C vs. 28°C). Label and temperature were manipulated orthogonally. The participants’ environmental concern was also measured. The environmentally concerned participant assigned higher thermal acceptance and satisfaction scores to the environment labeled “low carbon footprint” (i.e., “green” certified) compared to the environment labeled “high carbon footprint” (i.e., not “green” certified), but only in the cooler thermal environment. Environmentally indifferent participants’ perception of the environment did not differ depending on label or room temperature. The results suggest that a “green” label positively influence the perception of the indoor environment for occupants, but only when the temperature is within the acceptable range as proposed in guidelines for “green” buildings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 114, 140-147 p.
Keyword [en]
Green buildings; Indoor environment; Bias; Satisfaction; Environmental certification
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23022DOI: 10.1016/j.buildenv.2016.12.017ISI: 000393249800013Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85006822947OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-23022DiVA: diva2:1055887
Available from: 2016-12-13 Created: 2016-12-13 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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