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Wind turbines’ end-of-life: Quantification and characterisation of future waste materials on a national level
Energi Funktion Komfort Skandinavien AB, Nacka, Sweden.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5661-2917
University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
2016 (English)In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 9, no 12, 999Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Globally, wind power is growing fast and in Sweden alone more than 3000 turbines have been installed since the mid-1990s. Although the number of decommissioned turbines so far is few, the high installation rate suggests that a similarly high decommissioning rate can be expected at some point in the future. If the waste material from these turbines is not handled sustainably the whole concept of wind power as a clean energy alternative is challenged. This study presents a generally applicable method and quantification based on statistics of the waste amounts from wind turbines in Sweden. The expected annual mean growth is 12% until 2026, followed by a mean increase of 41% until 2034. By then, annual waste amounts are estimated to 240,000 tonnes steel and iron (16% of currently recycled materials), 2300 tonnes aluminium (4%), 3300 tonnes copper (5%), 340 tonnes electronics (<1%) and 28,000 tonnes blade materials (barely recycled today). Three studied scenarios suggest that a well-functioning market for re-use may postpone the effects of these waste amounts until improved recycling systems are in place.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 9, no 12, 999
Keyword [en]
Composites; Copper; Decommission; Electronics; End-of-life; Iron; Materials; Plastic; Recycling; Steel; Sweden; Waste; Wind turbine
National Category
Mechanical Engineering Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23262DOI: 10.3390/en9120999ISI: 000388604700021Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85002559771OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-23262DiVA: diva2:1063231
Note

Funding agency: University of Gävle

Available from: 2017-01-09 Created: 2017-01-09 Last updated: 2017-01-10Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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